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Thread: First year gardening, I think I started too early

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    Member Waldo2382's Avatar
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    Default First year gardening, I think I started too early

    Hi everyone,
    Like the title says. This is my first year. I started the seeds and the packages were saying that it takes about a week for germination. Well, it's been a week and the plants started sprouting within 2 days. I used those Jiffy seed starters and have a dozen Acorn squash, artichoke, butternut squash, cucumbers, jalapeno peppers, serrano peppers, 3 types of tomatoes, snow pea, pole pea and cabbage. Everything is taking off except for the pepper plants. Only have 3 jalapenos starting to sprout. Still have planty of snow on the ground with freezing temps at night. I never would've thought every single seed would sprout for these plants. I just have a condo with a moderate sized backyard. I may be giving away some of these plants. I've never done this before and have been suprised. My countertops, dinning table and window ledges are full right now and getting some 5 gallon buckets. Going to be quite the forest. Oh well, hope they do well til I can take them outside or we get some warm weather quick. Think I bit off more than I can chew, literally and figuratively.

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    Member Bsj425's Avatar
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    nah your not too early they take off guick then slow down when they get 7-8ish inches and they will still grow inside no problems just as long as they get some light during the day if you get to packed in the windows look at a green house cart and put it by a window thats an easy way to move them around and give them plenty of heat/ light

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    Waldo, this too is our first garden while living up here in Alaska. We planted tomatoes a little over a week ago in the house in 5 gal buckets and they are between 1-2 inches tall. We are still waiting to plant the rest of our veggie starters at the end of April. Looking forward to see how things turn out for us and all first timer gardeners. Good luck and keep all posted.

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    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
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    I ran a little experiment last year growing tomatoes in 5 gallon buckets.. 3 buckets I had to water 1/2 pint every day and 3 buckets were "self watering"... took about half gallon of water every 4 or 5 days depending on the temps. The tomatoes in the self watering buckets were bigger, produced more tomatoes.. and I could take off for 2 or 3 days of fishing without worrying about my tomatoes getting watered... This year all my 5 gallon buckets will be self watering.
    Heres one way to build a self watering bucket.. altho do a google search and you'll pull up lots more ways to do it...
    at http://alaskagrowbuckets.com/

    This year I'm growing several varieties of tomatoes to see which works best for us..

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    Member Waldo2382's Avatar
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    Here are a few pictures of my dining table. Looks like a lot of the Jalapenos are finally making an appearance along with 1 serrano.
    Attachment 58608Attachment 58609

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    Member Waldo2382's Avatar
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    Attachment 58612Attachment 58613The second picture is of Walla Walla onions and Red Onions. 50 out of 72, and some have 2 sprouts from an extra seed making it in there.

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    Member Bsj425's Avatar
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    your pics dont work. Also if you are doing peppers do you have a greenhouse? If not they will not do very well at all if they even stay alive peppers need ALOT of heat to do well same with tomatoes they can grow outside but wont do nearly as well as if they were in a greenhouse

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    Supporting Member bullbuster's Avatar
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    I can't see your pics, so this is a guess.
    If your plants are getting too big for the starters, no need to go right to big buckets. Solo cups with holes cut into the bottons should give you time for the snow to melt. If not then go from the Solo cup to a coffee can. You'll save a ton of room and need a lot less dirt.

    They might get a bit root bound, looking at all the snow that has to melt. Just break the roots when you transplant them. I have about 100 starts going and filled a couple dozen Solo cups yesterday.

    Now if I can get Patty to shovel off the garden, things will move a lot faster.
    Live life and love it
    Love life and live it

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    Member big_dog60's Avatar
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    The only thing I would be worried about is the squash and cucumbers. They may get big by the time you can plant outside. Also you have to be a bit more carefull when transplanting them.

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