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Thread: question about a hudson for sale

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    Member tboehm's Avatar
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    Default question about a hudson for sale

    I found a 99 hudson for sale but it has no spray rails for $2150 and no trailer. What would be your thoughts on the value and the fact that it has no rails? Owner says its in great shape.
    Semper Fi and God Bless

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    I'd buy it but then I never have any money so beware the source.

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    I'd sure go for it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by North61 View Post
    I'd buy it but then I never have any money so beware the source.

    Should have said that I'd check for sun damage first.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tboehm View Post
    I found a 99 hudson for sale but it has no spray rails for $2150 and no trailer. What would be your thoughts on the value and the fact that it has no rails? Owner says its in great shape.
    Go for it. In my experience, make sure to take off the aluminum c-channel riveted to the top of the stern and check to see if it's dry. The transoms are usually just plain plywood that is left bare and un-treated on the top, acting like a wick for moisture. 13 years is enough time for plain plywood to rot.

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    Quote Originally Posted by North61 View Post
    I'd buy it but then I never have any money so beware the source.
    Quit waisting funds on silly-boy rifles (338 lapua magnum?) that no traditional freighter-canoeist would honestly have a use for!

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    Quote Originally Posted by mainer_in_ak View Post
    Quit waisting funds on silly-boy rifles (338 lapua magnum?) that no traditional freighter-canoeist would honestly have a use for!
    Good point...It is an awesome round but the .405 Winchester seems to fit the boat better!

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    Default or the aluminum rear corners

    Quote Originally Posted by mainer_in_ak View Post
    Go for it. In my experience, make sure to take off the aluminum c-channel riveted to the top of the stern and check to see if it's dry. The transoms are usually just plain plywood that is left bare and un-treated on the top, acting like a wick for moisture. 13 years is enough time for plain plywood to rot.
    My Albany is still under feet of snow, so I can't go check it right now.

    I can't remember if that C channel is riveted or screwed. If its really riveted, I doubt the present owner would let you remove it.

    But, you might get almost as good of a view by removing (via screws) the two rear corner caps that Scott provides. Each one has a handhold to lift the boat, and they're at both the port and starboard sides of the transom, on its top, right where it meets each gunnel.

    Then look down into the end grain of the plywood stern. If you can dig its center out with a screwdriver, then its probably rotted.

    Its been a couple of decades or more since I replaced a transom (I swear I will not reveal the reason why I was forced to do so... ) , but I know that Mainer has done so pretty recently; on Mainer's project, it was because a canoe he bought needed a new transom, so don't try razzing him about that; me on the other hand; I'd be fair game.... well, except its a very very ancient story now. If you need to size what kind of work that would involve, I'm betting he wouldn't mind a post here, or a PM. He's very very smart about boat building, canoes, their construction, and lots else.

    On the bright side, if you find a rotting transom it might knock a heckuva lot off of the price. Many people just turn their canoe upside down on their lawn and think that's the way for it to while away a winter, or even for years.

    On the less-bright side, if you want to know what I paid for my Scott Albany (used from CL) PM me; I won't post that.

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    Member tboehm's Avatar
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    If I might ask no one has really made the comment about no spray rail and that is the thing that concerns me most. I would have to drive a long way to get it but will call and ask about the rivets or screws.

    Something I would have never considered and now is troubling.... Are the comments about the top of the transom not being treated a flaw in manufacturing that Scott overlooked or overlooks? Is it on older models and something that is rectified on newer models or do they still come that way.

    Can you knowledgeable members comment on wood rails for the top vs plastic.

    Thanks for the input and help.
    Semper Fi and God Bless

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    Putting on a spray rail is not a big project. Takes an hour and a half and costs whatever the Ash and bolts cost you. Even in the Yukon it was under 150.00.

    The plastic in and out-wales would take less upkeep. I started oiling my wood ones twice a year as Varnishing/sanding was driving me nuts.

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    Default Rails, inspection, and Scott transom

    Ditto North.

    Spray rails are no big deal to do (but I could not do it for merely $150 and an hour and a half - probably North works faster than I do though ); its lack of them just means that no previous owner was serious about taking it to any big water.

    I too like my wood gunnels, and I too oil them once a year and call it good.

    tboehm, I can't tell you about today's brand new Scotts, but the older ones did not have the top (end grain) of the transom treated. Yeah, I would have done it if I were building it, but I wouldn't call it a defect or anything. Its a good place to inspect (for rot) to find out how well previous owners have cared for that boat when it was not in the water.

    Inspecting the hull in detail, both inside and out, is a good way to find out how its previous owners took care of it while IN the water. Mine for example, has a few quite well done patches, that you can see if you look closely enough at the inside, and can't see at all from the outside. I don't think any less of my craft for having some "experience".

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    Member tboehm's Avatar
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    Thanks for all of the input guys.
    Semper Fi and God Bless

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