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Thread: Sinking boat story...

  1. #1

    Default Sinking boat story...

    Anyone read that story this morning about the two guys fishing when their boat sank? They were in the water for 30 hours and one died while the other made it to an oil rig.

    Part that struck me kind of odd is him leaving his buddy, making it to the rig alone, climbing up the ladder, calling it in, washing his clothing, doing whatever, etc, etc...If he had enough strength to function and do all that shouldn't he have pushed himself a bit more to stay with his wing man? I guess if you are dragging a person and couldn't get there with him that would make sense, got to be there to understand it all I suppose.

    WEAR YOUR PFD ALL THE TIME!

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    Member JR2's Avatar
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    I was thinking the same thing, but then I remembered so stuff from a cold water survival class I took. I am guessing the guy was in shock by the time he got to the rig and your mind can do strange things when in shock. Doing the laundry might have seemed perfectly normal at the time. I also think he made the right decision to leave his buddy. I hope I am never in a situation where I have to decide to leave someone to die, but in dire situations sometimes you have to make the decision to save yourself.
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  3. #3

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    There was also a girl down in South America who was on a boat that sank on a day fishing trip & I think she ended up in the dingy for 45 days of 3 she was the only one who made it, she drifted 300 miles.
    It the reason to be prepared. Neither party thought it would happen to them.

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    Member Alaskanmutt's Avatar
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    The south America on was a guy. When the first guy died they kept his body for a little less than a week but when he starrted rotting they rolled him over the side, whenthe second guy died the survivor kept him for a few days also till he started to rot, then he rolled him over too. The survivor almost died but a rain squall allowed him to fill the four gallon water container he had, which is what saved his life.
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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    From the photo I saw the one guy was much larger than the other and anyone that has been in cold water knows that fat will save you. I would wager a bet that the heavier guy survived.

    All these sad stories could have had a much different outcome if they just had a Personal Locator Beacon, I keep one tried to my PFD and also have survival gear for all on-board.

    They had a 30 foot boat, safety gear is cheap when you think about it!!!
    "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"
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  6. #6

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    ADRIFT the story of Steve Callahan, he holds the record for surviving in a life raft longer than any other single ALONE individual. 76 days.
    Fantastic book!!!

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    Not to bring up a grim topic again, but wasn't it just last year on Tustemena lake where a couple people died, and one made it to shore? You hate to think that way, but when you can barely save yourself, how are you supposed to save others? I can't imagine going through that, much less living with that, but survival instinct is in us all.

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    Member AlaskaHippie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by akboater80 View Post
    Not to bring up a grim topic again, but wasn't it just last year on Tustemena lake where a couple people died, and one made it to shore? You hate to think that way, but when you can barely save yourself, how are you supposed to save others? I can't imagine going through that, much less living with that, but survival instinct is in us all.
    2 died, 3 survived.

    LINK

    Location: Tustumena Lake
    Case Number: 11-51823
    Type: Search and Rescue/Body recovery

    Text: At approximately 1638 on 6/4/2011, Soldotna dispatch received a
    phone call relaying information about boating debris found in Tustumena
    Lake. A search involving an AWT aircraft, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife
    aircraft, and two U.S. Fish and Wildlife boats was launched to look for
    the five boaters suspected of being in the boat. The body of Katarina
    Anderson, 16, of Kenai was found at 1912 hours and the body of Ashley
    Udelhoven, 47, of Kenai, was found at 1924 hours. Three survivors,
    Udelhoven's daughters Hanna Udelhoven, 13, and Miranda Udelhoven, 15,
    both of Soldotna and a friend, Athena Robinson, 12, of Sterling, flagged
    down a search plane at approximately 2016 hours. The girls were
    transported by U.S. Federal Fish and Wildlife aircraft to Soldotna, they
    were then transported to Peninsula Hospital by CES for treatment of
    minor injuries. The survivors reported the boat had become swamped with
    water while crossing the lake the previous night and Udelhoven and
    Anderson had succumbed during the two-mile swim to shore. Everyone was
    reportedly wearing a lifejacket during the incident.
    “Life has become immeasurably better since I have been forced to stop taking it seriously.” ― H.S.T.
    "Character is how you treat those who can do nothing for you."

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    Member Cliffhanger's Avatar
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    Out of state for a week. Got a link to the story?

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    Default shock

    Quote Originally Posted by JR2 View Post
    I am guessing the guy was in shock by the time he got to the rig and your mind can do strange things when in shock.
    So true. I had always known it, but I Really Knew it after it happened to me a couple of times. Seems incredible that one and one would no longer equal two, but it is true.

    Both times I went into shock, I did not know it at the time.

    One of my times was due to hypothermia; my buddy saved me, got me into my camper, pegged the thermostat at 90 F, and fed me Dinty More stew and beer. That worked, but took a few hours.

    The other time was when I totaled my new (3 month old) Polaris ATV and it and I tumbled down a mountain (me head over toe) between a quarter of a mile and a half mile. That time I managed to drag myself to my truck, drive home (evidently accident free, but I didn't remember driving) and my buddy found me 3 hours later sitting on the concrete floor of a well-house outbuilding, just staring at the wall.

    Going into shock is a very strange and disconcerting feeling, after the fact - because at the time, you don't even know that there's a problem.

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    Member jojomoose's Avatar
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    "From the photo I saw the one guy was much larger than the other and anyone that has been in cold water knows that fat will save you. I would wager a bet that the heavier guy survived.

    All these sad stories could have had a much different outcome if they just had a Personal Locator Beacon, I keep one tried to my PFD and also have survival gear for all on-board.

    They had a 30 foot boat, safety gear is cheap when you think about it!!!"



    Your bet was right, the fatter one of the two survived. Crazy story though, he said in the interview that he was helucinating a lot before he finally got to one of the rigs he was swimming for. How they had a long conversation before they decided that both of them were not going to survive. That has to be one of the hardest things...to leave your buddy of twenty five years behind like that. I guess no one really knows what they are going to do in a situation like that until it happens to them. Stay prepared, and practice for the worst case scenerio. good fishing!

  13. #13
    Member pacific23's Avatar
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    That's a bummer and prayers to the Families.
    That around where I fish .

    Here is to days buoy data from around there...
    Buoy Data [Edit Locations]
    Port O Connor, TX (Buoy Station PCNT2)
    Wind Direction (WDIR): S
    Wind Speed (WSPD): 10 MPH
    Wind Gust (GST): 15 MPH
    Wave Height (WVHT): * FT
    Dominant Wave Period (DPD): * sec
    Atmospheric Pressure (PRES): * in
    Pressure Tendency (PTDY): in
    Air Temperature (ATMP): 74.66º F
    Water Temperature (WTMP): 74.7º F
    Updated: March 31 at 1500 GMT (Std Time Lookup)


    Port Aransas, TX (Buoy Station PTAT2)
    Wind Direction (WDIR): SE
    Wind Speed (WSPD): 10 MPH
    Wind Gust (GST): 11 MPH
    Wave Height (WVHT): * FT
    Dominant Wave Period (DPD): * sec
    Atmospheric Pressure (PRES): 29.9 in
    Pressure Tendency (PTDY): +0.04 in
    Air Temperature (ATMP): 73.22º F
    Water Temperature (WTMP): 75.4º F
    Updated: March 31 at 1500 GMT (Std Time Lookup)
    Buoy Data Disclaimer


    Note the water TEMP, right at 75* F , that's about as cold as I've seen it and on the Aransas buoy the water is WARMER than the air.

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