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Thread: PWS Mussels?

  1. #1
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    Default PWS Mussels?

    There are a number of beaches in PWS that are clogged with mussels. Are they good eating? Any precautions I should take or look for?

    Thanks for the help

    Bruce

  2. #2
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    I have eaten them from a couple of bays. Delicious but small.

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    Member Rob B's Avatar
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    I've eaten them about everytime I stop and walk the beaches. Like Dave said, small but delicious.
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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    I remember them being really good............I say "remember" because unfortunately it's been a long time since I've seen them in the Inlet.

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    Member Grizzly Man's Avatar
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    How do you cook them while out camping? camp Recipes?
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    Member Cap'n Ron's Avatar
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    Some scientists checked out the mussels and clams in our part of PWS about 3 years ago, and told us the were free of any toxins...I would check with AK Fish and Game and see what they say....

    If you have a shovel and a heavy cloth sack or some canvas (pair of Carharts??) .....make a fire, let it burn down to coals, set a shovel or piece of metal on the coals, wet the sack/cloth, put the mussels/clams/oysters in the cloth/sack, put on the shovel/metal, let steam and enjoy! Butter, lemon, Spike (spice mix), beer etc. can only make them better!

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    Member Rob B's Avatar
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    MMM Good eats right there.
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  8. #8

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    We've been eating mussels from the Sound for years. There are certain locations that you can find alot bigger mussels than the usual. Steaming in a pot with part water, part wine or beer, dipped in a little butter is hard to beat. Like the shrimp though, quality degrades the more you cook them. Go medium rare!!!

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    Member Arcticmayhem's Avatar
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    A quick and easy way to do mussels is to cut the top off a beer can, put 1" water in the bottom, fill it with mussels, then poke a stick through the top and hold it over the fire until they pop open.

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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Ah yes,, is it spring yet???

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    Member kobuk's Avatar
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    That had to be one of my favorite mid day snacks while camping out for the weekend. Some areas are definitely better, but they are pretty much everywhere. Same for the little steamer clams, although a looooot more work to get the clams.

  12. #12

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    Paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) is a sudden
    and potentially fatal illness contracted by eating
    clams or mussels that have concentrated a toxin
    present in plankton.
    None of the beaches in Prince William Sound
    are tested for PSP. Cases of PSP have been rare
    in Alaska, but users consume all shellfish at their
    own risk.

  13. #13
    Member AKluvr95's Avatar
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    [Duplicated from two posts on Clamming PWS] Further, if you read the response if symptoms occur [in links I provided below] it's important to be able to seek medical attention within 2 hours... I expect to be two hours from port so I'll be taking this into consideration and likely will not partake until I'm home. Call me over-protective but my time on the water is too important for the risk. I did get some phone numbers [currently misplaced] and these folk [biologists I think] are supposed to know the numbers of reported cases in Alaska and where the episode occured. I'll do my best to locate those numbers, call the POCs and report back soonest.

    Found the POC numbers and now waiting on call backs since both researchers were out of the office.
    I did some more research and found the following link to much more current data than the '94 infrormation [only 1 case in PWS ~ Monte clams] listed in the previous link I posted.

    http://www.epi.hss.state.ak.us/bulle...Poisoning+(PSP)



    Quote Originally Posted by Fathom View Post
    Paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) is a sudden
    and potentially fatal illness contracted by eating
    clams or mussels that have concentrated a toxin
    present in plankton.
    None of the beaches in Prince William Sound
    are tested for PSP. Cases of PSP have been rare
    in Alaska, but users consume all shellfish at their
    own risk.

  14. #14
    Member AKluvr95's Avatar
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    http://www.apiai.com/psp.asp

    One researcher called me back and provided this link.
    There are reports at the bottom of the page.

    Also, below you will find a more direct link to the epi website ~ not sure why the first one posted a shorter version which requires clicking on "list documents by subject".


    http://www.epi.hss.state.ak.us/bulle...Poisoning+(PSP)

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