Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: Closest location to Halibut fishing on the Kenai

  1. #1
    New member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    12

    Default Closest location to Halibut fishing on the Kenai

    My wife and I are going to be on the Kenai peninsula from about Aug 18 - 26 and would like to fish for halibut, silvers and hopefully ling cod. I am trying to find the port that would give us the shortest boat ride to where we could reasonable expect to catch halibut and perhaps ling cod. My wife is not a big water person so I am trying to avoid a long boat ride out and back. If you have specific charter recommendations that would be a plus.

    Thanks this is a great forum!!!

  2. #2
    Member breausaw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    830

    Default

    That time of year I would go out of Seward.

    If the weather is cooperative in the gulf you should have no problem finding a charter boat that will allow you to limit out on Silvers and halibut, ling cod can be more elusive. If you find the right skipper ling should be doable as well as a mess of rock fish; book your charter soon! ! ! ! !
    Jay
    07 C-Dory 25 Cruiser
    OurPlayground.


  3. #3
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    While Seward is by far my favorite Southcentral port to fish from, for people that don't like big water, it is probably the worst port to fish out of. The mouth of the bay is open to the Gulf of Alaska, and if you want to catch ling cod, you legally have to leave the bay to fish for them, figure 2 hours minimum from port to structure holding lings. Swells from the gulf are pretty much guranteed, so somewhere between the time the boat passes Caines Head out towards Rugged Island you'll be rolling over those swells. You're also almost guranteed to have an afternoon breeze on the return, which will kick up a nice chop.

    So if you have to tailor the trip around your wife, I'd say Ninilchik or Homer for halibut is your best bet.

    If your wife hasn't tried medications, I can highly recomend Bonine. Go figure that for several years after finishing my boat my wife finally mentions the reason she is so misserable on the boat is she gets seasick. Last season she started taking Bonine and suddenly she's at the helm driving, and on the deck fishing.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  4. #4

    Default

    Since your wife is not a big water girl, you'd better stick to Cook Inlet waters. Chaters out of Homer, Ninilchik, or even Deep Creek will get into halibut waters in around 15-20 minutes - even less. Heck, I have seen car toppers out there on nice days. Chances are, there won't be any swell unless you go out in bad weather (why would you do that), but there will probably be some chop, wakes, and other annoyances......

  5. #5

    Default

    Homer - Captain Pete of the Julia Lynn. When waters were rough last summer, he took my wife and I to a calm place where we caught lots of fish and had a great time. Captain Pete has a terrific reputation.

  6. #6
    Member jrogers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,539

    Default

    I would say Ninilchik. They beach launch there, and you are pretty much right at the fish. In picking a charter, I would ask how close they fish. Some go out quite a ways, and others stay close in.


    2009 Seawolf 31'
    www.seawolfmarine.com
    Fully Loaded

  7. #7
    Charterboat Operator
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Homer Alaska
    Posts
    715

    Default

    Rickflint!! As a charter captain out of Homer I always recommend Homer just on prince-able. However we can get you to the silvers and halibut close, but your looking at 2 n1/2 hrs minimum to the ling cod. there out there a ways for us!! you wont be sorry once you get there!!! I think????? and I don't know for sure.... but this type of short range trip maybe better from Seward or Whittier. That being said!!! it's a breath taking trip from Homer down to the Ling grounds!!!! Good luck

  8. #8
    New member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    12

    Default

    Thanks for all the responses so far! It seems like in order to get into the ling cod that no matter where we go out of we will have a 2 plus hour run. Not sure I want to spend that kind of time running and only leave a small amount of time for fishing. Does that make sense?

  9. #9
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    I understand what youíre thinking regarding longer boat ride equaling less fishing, but honestly I think the reality is quite the opposite.

    No offense to the charter captains (and this can vary quite a bit boat to boat) but I think for a close in halibut trip this is more likely the reality. You drop your 2-3# cod sinker and baited circle hook, wait awhile for a small halibut to bite, and reel it up. More of your effort goes into winching up the weight than fighting the fish. If the fish in the 15-20# size range (sometimes smaller) the captain or deckhand says, oh thatís a nice fish, and in the fish box it goes. You re-bait your hook and repeat for your second fish, when itís in the box you are done for the day. Theyíll be a few instances where you get excited and pull the hook out of the fisheís mouth before the circle hook is able to set itself, so you reel up the heavy weight only to re-bait the empty hook, or your bait is stolen by a smaller fish.

    I did have a trip like that ended up being one of my better halibut trips because Iíd brought my own rod and jigs, and I was on a delta with a big group of friends. The captain motored to 4 or 5 spots before we got on a good bite of chickens, and while everyone else was fighting their cod sinkers I was using 8-12 oz jigs and kept throwing back fish hoping for a big one. I doubt the biggest halibut I landed made 25#ís, but I lost count of how many fish I caught after 20. There is no way I would have caught that many fish if I was fighting cod sinkers all day. Definitely ask the charter if their halibut rods are all tuna sticks fishing bait or if they have some jigging rods.
    If you want to get in a lot of fishing for a day, then get on a good charter that is going to get you on a combination of halibut, rockfish, silver salmon and lingcod. If it takes 2 ½ hours to get the fishing grounds, then just stand on the fishing deck out of the wind and enjoy the scenery, wildlife and salt air. The fishing tends to be much, much better on the longer runs, though the weather doesnít always allow the captains to reach them.

    Iíll take a long boat ride to access good fishing over a short ride and mediocre fishing every time. For the joy of fishing, Iíd take a coho charter over a halibut charter.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  10. #10
    Member JR2's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    2,129

    Default

    I completely agree with you on that. While you can catch Halibut 10 minutes from Deep Creek it will probably not be that enjoyable. Part of the experience is the nice boat ride and what you see along the way. If it was me I would go out of Homer and take some sea sickness medicine... Out of Homer in that time frame you could catch Silvers, the odd feeder king, halibut and rock fish of many kinds.
    2007 Kingfisher 2825 - Stor Fisk

    Civilization ends at the waterline. Beyond that, we all enter the food chain, and not always right at the top. -- Hunter S. Thompson

  11. #11
    Member Rob B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Eagle River, Alaska,
    Posts
    3,151

    Default

    Scopolomine is a great sea sick med. It's a patch that you put behind your ear and it last for 72 hours. Bad part is you have to get it from your Dr. Might even be able to ask for the prescription over the phone though. Works great.....
    27' Wooldridge Super Sport Offshore Pilothouse PRIME TIME!
    Kodiak Custom Fishing Tackle Pro Staff
    Heavy Hitter Fishing Crew
    MMSI# 338232859

  12. #12
    New member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    12

    Default

    Thanks for all the input. I think we are going to go out of Seward, even though it will probably be a 2+ hour trip to the fishing grounds. It sounds like the boat ride is really a big part of the adventure and that the scenery should make the time go by quickly. It is probably a one time trip so why not make the most of all aspects of it. I will try to get my wife to take some sea sick meds before we go. I think we will be booking with either Just-in-time or Crackerjack.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •