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Thread: Wolverine Creek Brown Bear Hunt

  1. #1

    Default Wolverine Creek Brown Bear Hunt

    Headed to Wolverine Creek in about 6 weeks for a Spring Brown Bear Hunt. Looking for information on where to go. Any information on how aggressive the bears are in the area? How is the weather across the Cook Inlet from Kenai? How is the snow level? Any special equipment I should plan on getting outside of normal 7 day hunt pack list? I am in Afghanistan so I am at a distinct disadvantage on being able to get local updates. Have been on numerous hunts for Moose, Black Bear, and Sheep. Know my way around the mountains. Flying in. Look forward to hearing thoughts and info on the area.

    Brian

  2. #2
    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
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    Brian,

    Send me a message at my email broncoformudv at gmail.com

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    Sponsor Duckhunter01's Avatar
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    you two are within walking distance of each other..lol

    Bronco..shot you an email as well.

    Thanks
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    Just tryin to be polite and say if you mention names of hunting places chances are you will not be alone.I would follow broncos advice.I dont have very much info on that peticular area but if are in need of some general brownie hunting feel free to send me a message and I will see if I can help you out..
    Dave

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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    I was there fishing reds and the bears were everywhere. But at this time, all I would think would be to find some elevation and glass out over the flats. Unless you fly in way up above Wolverine Ck. in the mountains, I know it's way too thick to hunt bears in the woods behind where the creek dumps in. Oh and, I know you said you are oversees, but 6 weeks from now your chances at finding a hide that is in good shape may be pretty slim. But not knowing what kind of snow they got over there this year, I could be wrong. I only say this because a couple of guides that I know that used to hunt up high in that area always did "around" the first week of April. I do know that bears are shot off the beach over there quite often.

    Good luck, and thanks for your service...!!!

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    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Duckhunter01 View Post
    you two are within walking distance of each other..lol

    Bronco..shot you an email as well.

    Thanks

    Yeah I figured out who I was talking to after I got the email. Some of us are a bit slow at times.

  7. #7

    Default Your Welcome

    Had to generate some discussion. I was getting stir crazy.






    Quote Originally Posted by Duckhunter01 View Post
    you two are within walking distance of each other..lol

    Bronco..shot you an email as well.

    Thanks

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bear View Post
    Just tryin to be polite and say if you mention names of hunting places chances are you will not be alone.I would follow broncos advice.I dont have very much info on that peticular area but if are in need of some general brownie hunting feel free to send me a message and I will see if I can help you out..
    Dave
    No need to keep Wolverine Creek a secret. Those bears are viewed up close, and personal, by thousands of people every summer. Most have grown up with humans and have no fear of them because they pose no threat. The best way to harvest one of these trophies (and it's usually done this way) is to ease your boat up to about 10 yds, wait till he turns sideways, drop him, and roll him into your boat. The strenuous part is dragging him to a pristine spot for pictures.

  9. #9

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    Headed home in 7 days. Can't wait to get back to Alaska. Thank you for the information. I think we have set a couple of plans in play. One is glassing high and other is watching flats as you shared. Also, wait and see what the pilot has to say that is doing some scouting. If we are not successful, I drew DB309 for the fall and spring of next year. I might see if you have any information you can share. It should be an incredible adventure.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LIVE2DIY View Post
    No need to keep Wolverine Creek a secret. Those bears are viewed up close, and personal, by thousands of people every summer. Most have grown up with humans and have no fear of them because they pose no threat. The best way to harvest one of these trophies (and it's usually done this way) is to ease your boat up to about 10 yds, wait till he turns sideways, drop him, and roll him into your boat. The strenuous part is dragging him to a pristine spot for pictures.
    Really just like that huh...man I guess all my years of guiding bears I have been doin it wrong..c'mon that may work for the smaller bears or sows but my understanding from talking with another guide is that most large boars in that area have been nocturnal to say the least....sure there are exceptions but lets be realistic

    when areas are mentioned on forums they become very public and gain lots of interest to say the least...dont think so just give up all you honey holes and we will test that theory...
    Last edited by Bear; 04-29-2012 at 23:26. Reason: content

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    Quote Originally Posted by stangracer72 View Post
    Headed home in 7 days. Can't wait to get back to Alaska. Thank you for the information. I think we have set a couple of plans in play. One is glassing high and other is watching flats as you shared. Also, wait and see what the pilot has to say that is doing some scouting. If we are not successful, I drew DB309 for the fall and spring of next year. I might see if you have any information you can share. It should be an incredible adventure.

    All the best to you over there you....

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    Member Jason in Anchorage's Avatar
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    You might consider humping up the creek a ways and popping up a treestand if it's legal. Those bears follow that creek to the mouth.

    I have been there and viewed these bears up close...within' 1 foot of our john boat. Most were younger bears but a big ol boar did come down late morning...we estimated him at 8.5-9'. It was a great trip, I took the wife there to view them up close. She had no idea and thought we were just gonna fish. So we ease up to the creek...about 30 seconds into it, a sow does a cannonball into the water about 6' from our boat and splashed all of us. My wife used words I had never heard and I considered making her eat the bar of soap when we got home but I didn't want her to go blind from....SOAP POISONING!!!!!!!!!!

    BTW - we did see many black bears there that day as well. I think we counted 9 different brown bears and 2-3 blacks...in about 3 hrs.
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    I flew around the Wolverine Creek area last night. Still a decent amount of snow over there. There was one bar opened up enough to get a cub on wheels landed on. Didn't see any bears though.

  14. #14

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    High Country,
    Thank you for the information. I have been watching it with the FAA cameras for the Passes. It is still pretty deep in there. Should be interesting. Won't be there for another 11 days, so I think it will be melted down a bit by then and hopefully some more movement. Being in Afghanistan, that is the best report of the area I have received so far. I appreciate it.

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    Putting all sarcasm aside, I still feel that it's important to point out that the bears of Wolverine Creek (Big River Lakes) are not typical wild bears, and "hunting" them is at best, less than sportsman-like, and at worst, a major black eye to our sport. As a fellow big game hunter, and a fishing guide who has spent thousands of hours at Wolverine Creek, I say again, these bears are habituated to humans, and have no fear of us. They smell us, see us, fish beside us, raise their young among us and even give us a right-of-way that we don't deserve. Jason In Anchorage witnessed a scene that thousands from all over the world enjoy and marvel at every year. In my experience, the majority of these folks are non-hunters, and as a hunter, I spend much of my time with them explaining the role of hunters in Alaska and elsewhere. Probably the most photographed sow at Wolverine, a prolific "cannonballer", and mother to many generations of cubs was killed by a guided "trophy hunter", from a boat, while she stood on shore staring at him. How do you think this plays with the people that come back year after year to fish and enjoy these bears. I personally know of several other bears, some of the most human tolerant sows and juveniles on the planet, that were shot the same way.
    Thank you for your service, Brian, and welcome home. Having given my speech, I still respect your right to whack a bear, and hope you shoot a big old boar. Focus on the highest elevation you can get to, below the snow line. They'll still be a couple weeks out from hitting the flats and, with no fish yet, they won't be congregating around the lake or creek mouth. It's tough going up there, with thick vegetation, and few vantage points, but the boars should be out and about by then. Good luck.

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    Member SkinnyD's Avatar
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    No need to apologize for calling him out, DIY. I'm thinking it would be good to go ahead and pull the boat over next to the bear before shooting it so that it might just fall into the boat without getting wet. Who wants to skin a wet bear? Yuck!

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    Quote Originally Posted by LIVE2DIY View Post
    Putting all sarcasm aside, I still feel that it's important to point out that the bears of Wolverine Creek (Big River Lakes) are not typical wild bears, and "hunting" them is at best, less than sportsman-like, and at worst, a major black eye to our sport. As a fellow big game hunter, and a fishing guide who has spent thousands of hours at Wolverine Creek, I say again, these bears are habituated to humans, and have no fear of us. They smell us, see us, fish beside us, raise their young among us and even give us a right-of-way that we don't deserve. Jason In Anchorage witnessed a scene that thousands from all over the world enjoy and marvel at every year. In my experience, the majority of these folks are non-hunters, and as a hunter, I spend much of my time with them explaining the role of hunters in Alaska and elsewhere. Probably the most photographed sow at Wolverine, a prolific "cannonballer", and mother to many generations of cubs was killed by a guided "trophy hunter", from a boat, while she stood on shore staring at him. How do you think this plays with the people that come back year after year to fish and enjoy these bears. I personally know of several other bears, some of the most human tolerant sows and juveniles on the planet, that were shot the same way.
    Thank you for your service, Brian, and welcome home. Having given my speech, I still respect your right to whack a bear, and hope you shoot a big old boar. Focus on the highest elevation you can get to, below the snow line. They'll still be a couple weeks out from hitting the flats and, with no fish yet, they won't be congregating around the lake or creek mouth. It's tough going up there, with thick vegetation, and few vantage points, but the boars should be out and about by then. Good luck.
    After reading this post, I sure don't understand now what your intentions were with your first post....??? Kinda strange to me really....

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    After reading this post, I sure don't understand now what your intentions were with your first post....??? Kinda strange to me really....
    I think it's called sarcasm

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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fkroosher View Post
    I think it's called sarcasm
    I guess your right as he did say in his last post "putting all sarcasm aside", I detected a bit of sarcasm but I didn't get it totally, as well as the next person to post me thinks. Wish he would have just posted his last post in the first place. I guess maybe that's why he posted it......

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    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    i would like to point out also that many bears on salmon streams are very very tolerant of people, wolverine creek is not the only place bears are like that. some wild salmon streams i've hunted and guided fisherman on where the same, bears walk next to you, let their cubs come near you, and just stand and stare at you...just like dump bears. bears that are well fed and sense no urge to protect their food source are typically very tolerant of people, exspecially when there are more user groups around them, than just hunters.
    Streams that just have a majority of hunters the bears are more skittish....in my experience. i'm not going to say thats less sporting to shoot a bear in that situation, as we'd have to say the same about bears on bait stations, whale carcasses and so on...they are all watched by someone.

    i would however, steer clear of a small sanctuary like wolverine creek for my hunting....experiences like that are pretty cool, hunter or not.

    for some reason i was thinking it was illegal to hunt within one mile of the wolverine creek mouth?...
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