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Thread: Boyd's replacement stock Savage 99 project:

  1. #1
    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    Default Boyd's replacement stock Savage 99 project:

    This gun, originally purchased as a non-functioning paper weight chambered for 308 Winchester has been an ongoing project.

    Last year, I equipped it with new springs, and fixed the lever slop. It had no open sights so I outfitted it with a tall front bead and a marble flip-up rear sight. Sent it off to get rebored to 358 Winchester, and outfitted it with Weaver bases, and low profile quick release rings. I'm still waiting on the scope, but it's a 2-7 power Burris compact fullfield that only weighs about 12 oz.

    The birch stock with impressed checkering was disgustingly ugly IMO. Never can stray too far away from a real piece of walnut. I ordered the Boyd's replacement set with the longer front forearm. It didn't fit the barreled action AT ALL. It took at least 6 hours of sanding and cutting to get it too fit. Can't say I would want to do that again. The pistol grip area and the front of the comb had no shape. It was very "clubby" and unsightly. I wrapped an old EVA foam fishing pole handle with sandpaper and began working some shape into the stock. After the tedious finish sanding with 400 grit paper, and a final buffing of the unfinished stock set with steel wool, I decided to go with a medium walnut gun stock stain. It ended being a bit darker than expected, but I'm ok with that I guess. I eventually hand rubbed four coats of an oil finish over the stock. I'm still debating if I should buff it to a matte finish, or keep the sheen? What I do like about the oil finish is that it has no bumps or imperfections like air bubbles. It's very thin stuff and after four coats, the grain still has texture through the wood.

    Anyhow, I'm going to glass bed both pieces of wood with Brownell's Accraglass. After practicing my checkering pattern on the forearm and pistol grip area of the old stock, I'll give it a try on this walnut stock. I also ordered a grind-to-fit pacmyer recoil pad and some sling swivels.

    Off to Hunt_AK for a bead blast/matte dura-coat black finish next month, and it'll finally be done.



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  2. #2
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Pretty sweet little project!

    I have been tinkering with fitting a Boyd's laminate stock on my Ruger M77 tang safety. It is definitely not a little minor sanding to get em to fit! Really have to take your time to figure out where you need to remove material in order to get it to fit properly.

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    Member walk-in's Avatar
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    I know it's not an option for your 99, but I am very pleased with the stock I got from Richards Microfit. In my experience, all stocks need some shaping and at least minor fitting when you order them, but I got a really nice piece of wood from them for my Mauser project. I've started working on the exterior shaping while I wait to get my barreled action back, but it really doesn't need much. I'm using another rifle with a stock that I like as a template for the final sanding/shaping. The only thing I'm really putting much time into is the pistol grip.
    I've heard some complaints about Richards, but my experience has been good and I plan on ordering from them again. From the day I placed my order until the stock arrived on my doorstep was 9 weeks. I can live with that...especially considering the quality of the stock I got.
    We are right to take alarm at the first experiment upon our liberties.
    James Madison

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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    I'll keep that company in mind walkin. I hope there won't be a next time that I decide to open up my wallet and count the dollars that go into a rifle project. I would have been better off just buying another Browning lever rifle in 358. But, I had to "learn" a savage 99 project some time in my life.

    Biggest mistake I made:
    Forgot to release the firing spring tension before dis-assembly. I grabbed the action just the wrong way, and the firing pin sear bashed straight through the middle of my thumbnail and shattered it. After a few compounded vulgar words, I was back to work.

    Few things that worked well:

    1 A dry erase marker on the barrel works great for showing you WHERE to take off material in the barrel channel.

    2 I heated the wood to 150 degrees before I rubbed each coat. This really spreads the oil finish out when the wood is warm, and the first coat penetrated deeply into the wood.

    3. EVA foam is really good stuff for sanding blocks because it flexes slightly, conforming to the stock.

    4. Do measurements of the original stock with a set of calipers, and mark things with a fine pencil so you don't sand or cut too far.

  5. #5
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    What did you do to get the safety working?
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

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    Those are all good tips. I'm using the stock on my 270 and a set of calipers for most of the external dimensions on the one I'm working on.

    If you're looking to acquire a "cost effective" rifle, I don't think you're ever going to be better off building one vs. buying one. That isn't really what it is all about. In addition to my current project, I've got 1 more in the planning stages for myself. By the time I finish that one I'll be about ready to start 1 for my younger son. My dad built my first rifle, and I intend to do the same.
    We are right to take alarm at the first experiment upon our liberties.
    James Madison

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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    Didn't really have any problems with the safety, it's the type that locks the lever closed and blocks the trigger. It did protrude slightly not allowing the lever to full close, which directly effected trigger creep. I did polish the safety surface down flush with the bottom of the rifle.

    Oh, I like your new profile picture Amigo!

  8. #8
    Member Matt's Avatar
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    Nice project you got there. I'd buff out the stock myself as it would look better with that matte dura-coat coating. What barrel twist and what you plan on shooting in it?

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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    It's a standard 358 twist rate of 1:12". The barrel length is 20", and I plan to use the new 200 grain accubond for longer shots, and the 250 grain swift a-frame as an all around bullet. should have a range report soon.

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