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Thread: Alaska brown bear/grizzly B&C Question?

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    Member Kotton's Avatar
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    Default Alaska brown bear/grizzly B&C Question?

    I got stuck looking at the b&c site after looking at the swank ram and got to wondering were is the boundry from AK browns to grizzly's?? Iv'e never thought of it until now.I know they call the Kenai,Kodiak and the peninsula's brown bears.But what of the browns up north ,I've always heard them and called them grizzly's myself.Just wondering maybe some of you can fill me in.

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    Depending on where you go... they are the same animal, the size comes down to how much protein they rec from where they live. Alaska is known for brown bear due to the lines drawn for "Brown bear scoring" compared to "grizzly scoring". Canada tends to get the larger grizzly scores, but the line drawn in the sand for griz and brown are not the same for CA as AK. Meaning a Griz in CA (within 100 miles of the coast) would be a Brown in AK.

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    So are you saying a bear 101 miles from our coast line is considered a grizzly?Or is that just canada?

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    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
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    Its not that simple you have to look at that map B&C goes by or SCI goes by both use a different determination, not sure about Pope & Young though.
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    no I am saying if you look in the over all lines drawn for griz and brown. Griz in CA have more access to salmon than an AK griz by the lines draw in the record books. SCI, B&C, and P&Y have argued this for years. Using the 100 mile marker was an example of bad science that I do not agree with. Kodiak bears are the largest due to their access to protein.

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    Fergy is just sayin that canada doesnt differenciate at all between the two...they simply call all of their big bears grizzlies. Wheras we call our coastal bears brown bear. Boone and crocketts doesnt require a certain mileage but rather that they be taken from an area above the sixty second parrallel to be considered grizzly. Sci does draw the imaginary line with mileage though i disremember what it is exactly...im pretty sure its a bit less than one hundred though. I think its seventy five but dont quote me.

    I always thought it rediculous to record the same animal in a continent wide record book like boone and crockett and then not have the he decency to agree on a continent wide term (or terms) to describe the animal...otherwise kinda defeats the purpose of the book right? Hard to compare a brooks range grizzly to a big coastal bear from the bella koola valley over on the coast of bc...be like a guy from kansas or pike county illinois walkin up to a coues whitetail hunter from the southwest and goin: "my deer are bigger than your deer"............well no ****.

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    Haven't looked at a b&c book in years, but as I remember it they used a crest of the Wrangells,Mentasta Pass, crest of Alaska range,etc. boundary. Has this been changed? Or is my memory faulty?-- The last wouldn't surprise me at all, unfortunately.

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    Here's B&C's boundary maps....... http://www.boone-crockett.org/bgReco...area=bgRecords

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    Quote Originally Posted by ninefoot View Post
    I think its seventy five but dont quote me.
    If memory serves me, I also seem to recall that it's 75 miles....

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    And yes browns do cross over and become Grizz due to location....

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    How B&C describes it. Doesn't seem quite right to me to compare our interior grizzly's to BC's coastal brown bears.

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    I think it is a waste of the average hunters time to put much time in trying to get a "book bear". Those salmon fed "grizzlies" in Canada get big, as do the Alaskan bears. Good genetics, lots of fish and old age is normally a recipe for a big bear. I guess the record keepers had to come up with some thing though. For me, a true "mountain grizzly", from deep in Alaska's interior, that would square an honest 8' with a prime hide, is about as fine a North American trophy as I could get. But, for some one else it might be a fish fed 10' Brown Bear.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bear View Post
    gotcha thanx for clarifying...by the way, taking a book sci standard bear is far easier. The outfit i hunt for takes a good number of boars exceeding the sci standards for brown bear...but even our biggest ten ft class bears have yet to produce a skull that scored all time bc...the cloesest being a ten footer from last spring making the three year recognition standing...shows the difference in standards of the two record keepers. 26 inches for sci...28 for bc....those two inches can represent hundreds of pounds of size differenceo of animal

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    People do catch salmon at the far end of the Yukon and every other river so interior bears also have a chance for fish. A to here tell on the forum those interior bear are living high on moose and caribou even sheep so it ain't like they don't get their needed protein.Its known a bear will starve without some meat in its diet and not make the winter.Kenai has a skull shape as well as Kodiak and Admiralty the rest pretty much come from the same bucket.Its not uncommon for a ten foot Admiralty bear to have a smaller skull than a 9 1/2' Kodiak.A nine foot Kenai skull will be longer as a rule than a nine foot Kodiak skull but the Kodiak makes up for it with width. Now a Hyder brownie and Stewart grizz is the same don't care what the smart folks say
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    Quote Originally Posted by ninefoot View Post
    gotcha thanx for clarifying...by the way, taking a book sci standard bear is far easier. The outfit i hunt for takes a good number of boars exceeding the sci standards for brown bear...but even our biggest ten ft class bears have yet to produce a skull that scored all time bc...the cloesest being a ten footer from last spring making the three year recognition standing...shows the difference in standards of the two record keepers. 26 inches for sci...28 for bc....those two inches can represent hundreds of pounds of size differenceo of animal
    Ya know you said it right Zack SCI has there own way of doing things for sure...

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    I've read too that the coastal bears have a shorter and less harsh of a winter than the northern inland bears. Thus allowing them to eat longer before having to hibernate again.

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    If you drive out the Denali hwy from Cantwell, the line used to follow the Nenana river from the headwaters downstream to near where the river intersects the Parks hwy... south of the river its a brownie, north of the river its a grizzly...
    I don't know what it is if you shoot it in the middle of the river,,,,,

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    Quote Originally Posted by DEDWUF View Post
    I don't know what it is if you shoot it in the middle of the river,,,,,
    Probably lost.....

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    Quote Originally Posted by Amigo Will View Post
    People do catch salmon at the far end of the Yukon and every other river so interior bears also have a chance for fish. A to here tell on the forum those interior bear are living high on moose and caribou even sheep so it ain't like they don't get their needed protein.Its known a bear will starve without some meat in its diet and not make the winter.Kenai has a skull shape as well as Kodiak and Admiralty the rest pretty much come from the same bucket.Its not uncommon for a ten foot Admiralty bear to have a smaller skull than a 9 1/2' Kodiak.A nine foot Kenai skull will be longer as a rule than a nine foot Kodiak skull but the Kodiak makes up for it with width. Now a Hyder brownie and Stewart grizz is the same don't care what the smart folks say

    Amigo soooo much truth in what you speak.I think out of all the species I have ever guided brown/griz is the least one where we try to get book,besides it being difficult to judge a skull most people would rather have a big hide then head. Wayyy to many variables in head size as you pointed out from area to areaI have taken 10' with small heads and 9' that make book.I also know of a brownie in grizz country(if still there or alive) he was pushin 10' but obviously lost as there was no doubt as to what he was.Guess he didnt read the maps as not to cross the boundry..lol To me usually book bear are just a bonus.

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