Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Old BearCat afficionados

  1. #1
    Member Yukoner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Whitehorse Yukon
    Posts
    1,345

    Default Old BearCat afficionados

    Thats you Mainer
    Just picked this 440 up. It'll sit in the stable alog side my 340 BC.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Never wrestle with a pig.
    you both get dirty;
    the Pig likes it.

  2. #2
    New member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    3

    Default

    i just picked up the same sled and good bad or ugly u can tell me. and any hunting modifications youve done/

  3. #3
    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Delta Junction
    Posts
    4,078

    Default

    My son runs one, they've got plenty of power. He started his first season on a tundra, second season on a 340 bearcat, and finally this season on a 2000 440 bearcat ll. He'll have to run this one till he's old enough to buy his own machine. They don't build machines like this anymore. Though not up to snuff with a big widetrack machine with hi-lo gears, they will get on top of powder and really pull up large hills. You have 50 horesepower laden with torque, it's plenty of power with extra to spare when safely climbing hills with a loaded freight sled. That's one thing that darn near killed my son one season, trying to get a moderate load up a tall icy hill (even with studs). He had it pinned, but as the incline steepened, the machine bogged down. Same hill with a studded 340 bearcat, the thing didn't even notice the hill. But the 340 was lacking due to the track size and the skinny trail skis. Right out of the box, the 440 is an excellent all purpose machine. Fuel efficient, will pull a heavy load, the ride is very smooth, heavy duty clutching for tight woods work, reverse, simple and easy to work on, 16 inch wide track, wide plastic skis, and plenty of utility rack space. Expect to get 15,000 miles out of one, and don't sell is cause it's old, it will do everything a 550 tundra will do, but with better fuel economy and at a fraction of the cost.

    White lithium spray grease is your friend, use it liberally on all the friction surfaces of that clutch, unless you want to rebuild it. Elan mentioned switching to the driven shaft bearing and the housing in another thread, do that if you wish. I know guys who drill holes into the zerk-side rubber ring that seals the bearing so grease can be applied, and that works too. Make sure you aggressively yank that reverse handle. The reverse will oftentimes partially engage (or not at all) if you pull it back like a little girl. Then.....it will grind. You may not damage anything, but you might. Like elan said, don't throttle down hard in reverse.

    The motors are bulletproof, BUT they don't like low idle. Coldest I've turned over a suzuki fan motor, is 48 below. It's a one-pull deal, but a higher idle help immensely. Having a primer and a choke with both half choke and full choke abilities is an excellent feature. These suzuki motors start on the coldest of days, and with the best of em.

    We're thinking of getting sway bar kits for both of our utility machines as 156 inch long tracks and skinny ski stances make tight trails at speed, difficult. The handle bars sit far too low though. You will really need a riser and a grab strap atop the handle bars. Run the tallest riser you can find, without having to extend throttle cables/wires, so you can actually ride the machine. Drive a ton of atv studs into the track, dip each one into glue before you drive it home, you'll loose less atv studs. Not running studs IMO, is a safety hazard, though you don't need to spend loads of cash for the real ones if you don't want to.

    If you have the worthelss steel skis, AK snowmobile salvage sometimes has wide plastic skis, deal with them though, as their prices could be better. First price out a new pair and make that apparent to contrast their asking price for used skis.

  4. #4
    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Delta Junction
    Posts
    4,078

    Default

    One more thing, OldJohn, hutnphotos and mit run these bearcats too. There were some design changes on the 98-2000 ones, though I'm uncertain what they were.

    Not much bad to be said about their ability to perform backcountry and utility tasks

    I personally like them for tight woods bombing, general riding and moderate load hualing. For a larger load hauler, I'd rather run a widetrack utility machine with a true hi/low gear box.

  5. #5
    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Delta Junction
    Posts
    4,078

    Default

    Nother thing:

    The sitting position on the bearcats is horrible. Get you some aluminum sheet metal, fabricate and rivet an under seat storage box that is about 8 inches in depth. This will raise you up so you don't destroy your back, or drive with your darn knees sittin in your armpits!

    To do so, you'll have cut the plastic seat housing off the back of the gas tank because they come as one piece. You will then have to devise a rear tie-down for the gas tank. Not having an underseat storage compartment on a utility machine is a major negative. You really need one for stuff.

    One of those willy wonka mini guys must've designed the riding postition for this line-up of machines.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •