Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Prop protection for shallow water?

  1. #1
    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Deltajct
    Posts
    2,499

    Default Prop protection for shallow water?

    How many have used some sort of a skag that will hit before the prop hits?

  2. #2
    Member spoiled one's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,230

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rock_skipper View Post
    How many have used some sort of a skag that will hit before the prop hits?
    Yea, it's called a jet unit.

    Are you thinking about one of these?

    Mac's river runner
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

  3. #3
    Member pacific23's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Whitesboro, Texas
    Posts
    534

    Default

    Here is what can happen with shallow water or stuff in the water , point being....KNOW WHAT YOU ARE RUNNING IN or it will be VERY expensive.

    Here is a pacific 23 owned by some Indian Cops in Washington . They hit a log [ missed the first two] at 35kts. The Suzuki 250 only had about 20 [twenty] hours on it and I think this was their 3rd motor.
    ALL the welds and the boat are in great shape but the motor was defiantly lost to old man river.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  4. #4

    Default

    I use the Hydro shield and love it has saved me lots of props and helps performance. Have used them for years on a lot of boats.

    http://www.hydro-shield.com/why.htm

  5. #5
    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer, AK.
    Posts
    4,120

    Default

    Holy cow Pacific23, thats eye opening!
    Or you could get the prop completely out of the water and run an airboat.....he-he-he!
    BK

  6. #6
    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Deltajct
    Posts
    2,499

    Default

    KK, thats the desgin of what we used to use on the river, but we fashioned them out of iron.

  7. #7
    Member cod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Ak.
    Posts
    2,213

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rock_skipper View Post
    How many have used some sort of a skag that will hit before the prop hits?
    ..................................................
    I put a "Macs" on my 35hp outbd. attached to my inflatable. I destroyed a couple props on the middle Kenai over a couple yrs. I havent tried it there yet but have run it in cook inlet a few times and havent noticed but MAYBE one knot reduction in speed. I suspect one may still ding it a little with it on, but shouldnt get the prop wiped out on one lone rock. Was pretty easy to put on. Just drill 4 holes thru the skag and bolt up. I'll know more when i get the boat back on the Kenai. Thats what I bought it for.
    Your sarcasm is way, waaaayyyyyyyy more sarcastic than mine!

  8. #8
    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Deltajct
    Posts
    2,499

    Default

    Back in the day we had the brass props, they get dinged up and you were able to take them off and hammer them back into shape. ( a little filing and you were back on the river, lol maybe a little smaller, but you could run them things down to a nub. )

    The stainless and the aluminium are a whole differnt story.

  9. #9
    Member cod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Ak.
    Posts
    2,213

    Default

    I brought my 3 bad props in to get fixed. They were able to fix just one-(or was it 2??). They were aluminum.
    Your sarcasm is way, waaaayyyyyyyy more sarcastic than mine!

  10. #10

    Default

    For our small outboards (15hp) that we run on our freighter canoes, we have built skeg extensions to protect the props. Bolt a flat plate around the cavitation plate and run a steel rod from that along the leading edge of the engine casing down, following the contour of the factory skeg and then extending horizontal out past the back edge of the prop. Extend it far enough back that if you drift back onto a rock, the rod will catch before your prop would hit holding you off. Slide some heavy duty rubber tubing around the steel rod to create a shock absorber between the rod and the engine casing in case you hit a rock (acts like a spring so the shock doesn't transmit directly into the engine gearing). This doesn't protect from everything as you could still catch the edge of a rock that the skeg slips past, but it gets most things.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •