Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: Primer blowing out of casing

  1. #1
    Member Burke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    735

    Default Primer blowing out of casing

    I started shooting a new to me rifle and after two sessions (18 rounds) it blew the primer out of the casing. The rifle was cleaned between sessions. Shooting federal off the shelf rounds through Kimber 8400 300WSM. There are nick marks on the rim of cartridge as well as the blown primer. A friend who knows more about guns than I said it sounds like problems with either pressure or head space.

    Someone recommended M&M gunsmith in Butte. Anyone be able to share experience with them or recommend another gunsmith to look at this problem?
    Thanks

  2. #2
    Member Gerberman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Soldotna AK, Eugene, OR
    Posts
    612

    Default

    What do the rest of the primers look like, are they flat or still recessed in the case? Can you measure the overall length of a fired case and compare it to the unfired case? Measure the outside dimension of the fired case and compare to new. These measurements should be within about .0005.

  3. #3
    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Delta Junction
    Posts
    4,078

    Default

    don't forget to check the shoulder of the fired case as compared to the dimensions of the unfired cases. It may very well be the load you are using. Check Federal Recalls too. To be honest, I had excessively sticky extraction and cratered primers with federal blue box in my 308 rifle. Do get a gunsmith to check it out though.

  4. #4
    Member akgun&ammo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    North Pole
    Posts
    983

    Default

    Does any other brand of ammo do this in your rifle?
    Federal had a small problem of not enough neck tesion in some flavors of ammo...
    That would cause a little primer setback, example is like when us shooters use wax, plastic, or rubber projectiles we drill out the primer hole to a larger size to eliminate this problem.
    Nick marks on the rim could just be the extractor....

    I guess what I'm saying is right now you do not have 'nough info.

    I would actually get a different box of shells (or get a few from one of your buddies) and shoot your rifle again.

    keep us posted on the outcomes,

    Chris

  5. #5
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Missing Palmer AK in Phonix AZ.
    Posts
    6,416

    Default

    What kind of gun and so on . . .
    Andy
    On the web= C-lazy-F.co
    Email= Andy@C-lazy-F.co
    Call/Text 602-315-2406
    Phoenix Arizona

  6. #6
    New member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    2,022

    Default

    Did the ammo chamber properly/easily, without force ? If it chambered as it should then I would susppect the headspace is not below minimum (tight). I would try a new flavor/brand of factory ammo, the lot of Federal that you fired may have been "defective" by way of overcharge or incorrect powder, or some such. I would also inspect the chamber with a light and be sure the chamber is perfectly clean.

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    1,461

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Burke View Post
    I started shooting a new to me rifle and after two sessions (18 rounds) it blew the primer out of the casing. The rifle was cleaned between sessions. Shooting federal off the shelf rounds through Kimber 8400 300WSM. There are nick marks on the rim of cartridge as well as the blown primer. A friend who knows more about guns than I said it sounds like problems with either pressure or head space.

    Someone recommended M&M gunsmith in Butte. Anyone be able to share experience with them or recommend another gunsmith to look at this problem?
    Thanks
    I'd certainly have a gunsmith check the headspace. And I would NOT shoot it again without that verification. If you just can't stand waiting, for Pete's sake wear shooters' glasses. Hot gasses can come back through the firing pin or bolt with a blown priimer.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Missoula, MT
    Posts
    448

    Default Headspace

    You can check the head space by using an unfired-factory round. Put a single piece of masking tape on the base and trim off the excess by using a knife blade. As you close the bolt on the loaded round, your bolt should "hang up" just as the bolt goes down into battery. Yes, you can force the bolt to seat the round but that is not what you are after. You want to feel the bolt hang up. If these is no hang, you have excess head space. You can either take it to a gun smith for a set back and rechamber job, return it to the factory for the same operation or handload for it. Telling you how to handload for a rifle with excess headspace will take more than a paragraph.

    Good luck. J.

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    SwampView AK, Overlooking Mt. Mckinley and Points Beyond.
    Posts
    8,809

    Default

    The 300 WSM, and the other WSMs have higher maximum pressure specs, than most other cartridges.

    65,000 psi for the 300 WSM.

    It's not unusual for a particular WSM FL, to be too hot for a particular rifle.

    Odds are, this is the problem.

    Try different FLs??? Call Kimber???

    Get a 30-06???

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  10. #10
    Member Burke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    735

    Default

    Thanks for your thoughts everyone...
    The first time I fired the gun it did seem to chamber strangely...the action wouldn't close. I pulled the shell out and did a swipe and then it chambered ok.

    I am not in any way, shape or form a gunsmith. I wouldn't trust my own work, I would rather leave it up to an expert. I am sure if I had some time to read and learn I might be able to do simple things. I would like to be able to speak to the gunsmith with at least a kernel of knowledge. This forum is an attempt to learn something. I have never had a firearm with problems before...

    I will call Kimber. I did not find any recalls or issues online for federal ammunition (maybe need to look closer).


    Any recommendations for a gunsmith?

  11. #11
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    When you say it blew the primer out of the casing, do you mean when you ejected the shell, there was no primer in the casing, or that the primer protruded from the case head?

    If the primer fell out of the case, then your ammo is opperating at extremely high pressure ~75,000 psi and you should not fire any more of that ammunition.

    If the primer is protruding from the case head than it is most likely due to excessive head space, take it to a gunsmith to check the headspace.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  12. #12
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    4,431

    Default

    Hmmmm....not really enough info.

    IF a primer was blown (out) of the case (it's not a casing, that's for sausage) the pressure was definitely too high. We do not know why at this point. If it was the 18 round and all others were ok it could be that on round was dimensionally wrong.

    Kimber WSM's have had many problems similar to this. I think Kimber had chamber dimension problems. They will fix. Do what you think best but If you fired a factory round that blew a primer, I would not soot it again until we know what happened. Best advice at this point is to clean the rifle thoroughly and have a cerosafe case made of the chamber to check dimensions.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  13. #13
    Member Burke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    735

    Default

    Paul H ... When I ejected the shell the primer was gone...just a black hole left. Not sure where or how it disappeared...it may have fell out as the shell ejected?
    Thanks Murphy...sorry bout the terminology mistake....

    It sounds like the consensus is one of two things, head space or pressure.

    I have not talked to a person at Kimber yet. I wonder if the will accept a gun for repair that is purchased second hand.

    I still do not have a recommendation for gunsmith, do all of them make a cerosafe case?

  14. #14
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    When a primer is missing from a fired case it indicates that the brass casing yielded and expanded to such a degree that the primer pocket expanded and no longer could hold the primer. I expect you also saw indications where the brass flowed into the ejector in the bolt head and possibly took on some of the machining marks from the bolt head.

    For the brass casing to flow in this manner, either the pressure in your gun built up to very high levels, or the brass was not properly hardened. More often than not this is an ammunition, not a gun issue. Typically you see it on later shots as the gun has warmed up from pervious shots, the round is in the chamber and is heating up while you aim the shot and then you eject the case with the primer curiously missing.

    You should have a gunsmith check the chamber with a no-go gauge and make a chamber cast, though chamber cases are fairly easy to do at home. I'd also suggest contacting Federal and letting them know the lot number of your ammunition and the problem you had. Perhaps they are aware of pressure issues with that lot of ammunition.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  15. #15
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    4,431

    Default

    If the primer was blown by excess pressure, the primer pocket will be too expanded to hold a new primer. The pocket is supposed to be .210" in diameter.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •