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Thread: Went To Get Some Wood..uggh!

  1. #1
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    Default Went To Get Some Wood..uggh!

    Drove 55 miles up towards the Yukon for a sled-load of wood. 55 miles of driving over concrete embedded with bricks. I broke my sled, my butt, and gave myself a headache. Ohhhhhh....my back still aches and my kidneys are really angry at me.

    Standing dead trees all around, cut three big ones, got one out then dumped it beside my trail to pick up later, cut another and promptly got stuck. I mean S-T-U-C-K. I hate it when that happens. Dropped all the wood, dug out the sled, dug out my snogo, and was able to drive out. I was so incredibly pooped by that time I left all the wood to pick it up another day and came home. Another 55-miles of concrete embedded with bricks. Yee-haw.

    I learned a couple things:
    1. I do not need to take a 15-gallon drum with gas. A five will do.
    2. D not rust someone when they tell you there is too much soft snow, see for yourself.
    3. Do NOT forget the grub. You'll get hungry. I know this from experience.
    4. Don't take your cell when it is -22*F, it will freeze and die. Even though I had it inside my vest against my body.
    5. Even though the suspension was adjusted properly, millions of concrete/snow bumbs will eventually get to you so take the motrin BEFORE you leave.
    6. Leave early so you can recover an hour or so before coming back.

    Other than that, it was a fun trip. Now all I have to do is repair my sled and go back for the wood on my week-off in eight days.

    Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocre minds. The latter cannot understand it when a man does not thoughtlessly submit to hereditary prejudices but honestly and courageously uses his intelligence. Albert Einstein

    Better living through chemistry (I'm a chemist)

    You can piddle with the puppies, or run with the wolves...

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    Maybe you should register and see about getting the trail groomed....

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    Nitro, It might benefit yah to run some dogs in conditions like that! They don't break down. It's funny, you USE a snowmachine or sno-go. Take look at all the Anchorage-Area joy ride threads right now on the "snowmachine" forum: "Where to ride around biglake, "March 16th joyride", Talkeetna joyride video, "Houston Poker run", "Yetna (anchorage's backyard) trail conditions" "Willow highway trail report".

    And then.......there's YOU, and a few others. I think the word "snowmachine" should be replaced with "snowmobile" with every thread I mentioned. I enjoy your snowmachining threads Nitro, but I think I'm done visiting this "snowmobile" forum much anymore.

    I was out at Crosswind Lake a couple weeks ago and learned something new about 60-80 mph winds and wind-blown lake snow. If you don't cover your machine at night, your entire undercowling will get filled with snow. I will never fish in a soft sided shack again either. I also learned that you're only as reliable as your buddie's sled this season. Especially when you realize his rubber carb boots (airbox side) were severely cracked, allowing his carbs to SUCK in a ton of snow and he can't figure out why his machine won't start when his whole under-cowling is filled to the brim with snow. Nothing like trying to work on carbs with bare hands in 60 mph winds with sand-blasting snow. Nothing like 5-6 ft. snow drifts in the middle of the night trying to find your way back either.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NRick View Post
    Maybe you should register and see about getting the trail groomed....
    Ha, that's funny! Made me smile this morning, thank you.
    Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocre minds. The latter cannot understand it when a man does not thoughtlessly submit to hereditary prejudices but honestly and courageously uses his intelligence. Albert Einstein

    Better living through chemistry (I'm a chemist)

    You can piddle with the puppies, or run with the wolves...

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    Quote Originally Posted by mainer_in_ak View Post
    Nitro, It might benefit yah to run some dogs in conditions like that! They don't break down. It's funny, you USE a snowmachine or sno-go. Take look at all the Anchorage-Area joy ride threads right now on the "snowmachine" forum: "Where to ride around biglake, "March 16th joyride", Talkeetna joyride video, "Houston Poker run", "Yetna (anchorage's backyard) trail conditions" "Willow highway trail report".

    And then.......there's YOU, and a few others. I think the word "snowmachine" should be replaced with "snowmobile" with every thread I mentioned. I enjoy your snowmachining threads Nitro, but I think I'm done visiting this "snowmobile" forum much anymore.

    I was out at Crosswind Lake a couple weeks ago and learned something new about 60-80 mph winds and wind-blown lake snow. If you don't cover your machine at night, your entire undercowling will get filled with snow. I will never fish in a soft sided shack again either. I also learned that you're only as reliable as your buddie's sled this season. Especially when you realize his rubber carb boots (airbox side) were severely cracked, allowing his carbs to SUCK in a ton of snow and he can't figure out why his machine won't start when his whole under-cowling is filled to the brim with snow. Nothing like trying to work on carbs with bare hands in 60 mph winds with sand-blasting snow. Nothing like 5-6 ft. snow drifts in the middle of the night trying to find your way back either.
    Now that's what I call a day! LMAO.

    It's all part of being outside yeah? But you had fun? Got a story to tell now yes? There ya go. I was going to take photos, but left my kewl Casio digital home (was thinking about that as I abused myself going up), and completely forgot my cell takes pix. I could have warmed it up using the air off the engine, but still didn't even remember I had it until I got home and was undressing.

    Have to go to work in a couple hours, start the day-cycle week, then on my week off I will retrieve the wood I cut.

    On the way up I saw two (2), new tracks from early that morning, a few old tracks, but nothing else. It was pretty chilly! I made up three 2x12 laminated to 1/4" ASX plywood that I will bolt onto the bed of the sled. I believe this will help it these last few trips of the year to survive the ride back with a load. And these were good trees too so I'm not going to leave them there.
    Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocre minds. The latter cannot understand it when a man does not thoughtlessly submit to hereditary prejudices but honestly and courageously uses his intelligence. Albert Einstein

    Better living through chemistry (I'm a chemist)

    You can piddle with the puppies, or run with the wolves...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nitroman View Post
    Drove 55 miles up towards the Yukon for a sled-load of wood. 55 miles of driving over concrete embedded with bricks. I broke my sled, my butt, and gave myself a headache. Ohhhhhh....my back still aches and my kidneys are really angry at me.

    Standing dead trees all around, cut three big ones, got one out then dumped it beside my trail to pick up later, cut another and promptly got stuck. I mean S-T-U-C-K. I hate it when that happens. Dropped all the wood, dug out the sled, dug out my snogo, and was able to drive out. I was so incredibly pooped by that time I left all the wood to pick it up another day and came home. Another 55-miles of concrete embedded with bricks. Yee-haw.




    We usually have a consolidation place on good solid snow in open areas. We bring logs out one at a time out of the soft deep stuff in thick trees. A bit more time consuming but it's much more manageable and probably less time consuming than digging out your whole load.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JerryBet View Post
    We usually have a consolidation place on good solid snow in open areas. We bring logs out one at a time out of the soft deep stuff in thick trees. A bit more time consuming but it's much more manageable and probably less time consuming than digging out your whole load.
    This is what I will do Thursday morning when I go back for the wood.
    Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocre minds. The latter cannot understand it when a man does not thoughtlessly submit to hereditary prejudices but honestly and courageously uses his intelligence. Albert Einstein

    Better living through chemistry (I'm a chemist)

    You can piddle with the puppies, or run with the wolves...

  8. #8
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    Okay, on Thursday when I left the house it was -25* F below. Perfect for outdoor fun!!

    On Wednesday I added the two 2x12's to reinforce my sled so I could long-haul a heavy load. I gassed up the machine, topped up the oil, greased all the bearings, put everything together. I left at 0930. When I got to where I dropped the wood it was a beautiful morning. Set to work right away by cutting another big tree. I felt having three, 14-foot trunks on the bottom, with the rest on top would be fine. Since this wood is dry, the weight shouldn't be bad.

    Now the bad things started happening. My ratchets on the straps simply refused to work. It was too cold for icing up, they just refused to unlatch so I could lengthen the straps. Every one I had to fight with. Then after getting all the smaller pieces into a clearing on relatively hard snow, I heard something large moving through the woods. I waited for about 15 minutes listening to branches being broken and such. I drew my sidearm, chambered a round and waited. Whatever it was moved off. Scary.

    I had laid two small logs parallel to roll the big ones onto while I gathered in all the wood. This worked fine. Two of the big logs I had to use a ratchet strap around the trunk, and another to drag it onto the sled 4 inches at a time. It worked though. Then I got the sled stuck by miscalculating and drove the runner into a tree. Had to drop the log, get the sled un-stuck, then work the log back on the sled. Tedious.

    Finally got all the wood onto the sled. I was worried I might not be able to do it, but I managed. I drove over the trail 3-4 times to make sure of the route, and pack it down, it was good and hard. Perfect. I went to hook up the sled and found the links on the lock-pin AC puts on the hitch had managed to get jammed together. I had to turn off the machine, unpack my grub box, get a needle-nosed pliars to un-jam the things, and put all back together. Remember what I said about everything not wanting to work?

    I started by giving a little gas to the machine and then letting off, the shock on my drawbar compressed enough to move the sled a couple inches and I began to go. Took it up to about 5-8 mph to negotiate a 90* right hand turn with a slope to the outside left. I thought this is where I might get stuck, but I could feel the sled tracking true. Continued another 200-feet then a small dip through some trees, just needed to negotiate a meadow straight out onto rock hard snow-covered lake. As I passed though the trees I gave the machine a little gas as I came up the little dip, this dip is maybe one foot over 20 feet, not much of a dip. The machine was making excellent traction and when the sled went into the dip the little gas I gave it caused the skis to lift with the machine pulling strong to the right, it started to roll over and I bailed into waist-deep snow. I turned around to see the sled had slid off the track and submarined. Egad not again! Yup. Except this time I had to unpack everything from the sled as the front right was actually under the snow. Got it out and attempted to put one log at a time on to take out to the lake, which is what I should have done. The snow was like sugar, nothing to push against, and after putting everything together twice that day, I hauled my gear back to Bethel. I walked into the house, it was 6:45 p.m. I was beat.

    I am determined to get that wood. And I will, considering the effort I put into it. This time when I go up I will leave at 0700, take no chainsaws, but will bring a Peavey to help with the moving. I could also cut the big logs in half, but in my experience, with the way the sled flexes, small logs on a large sled tend to work themselves out of the restraints you put on them. With 55 miles to drive, I would be struggling to put the load back together every 10-15 miles I suspect. We will see.

    Oh, I'll take some pix too.
    Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocre minds. The latter cannot understand it when a man does not thoughtlessly submit to hereditary prejudices but honestly and courageously uses his intelligence. Albert Einstein

    Better living through chemistry (I'm a chemist)

    You can piddle with the puppies, or run with the wolves...

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