Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: Lets talk mountain bikes

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Olympia, WA
    Posts
    433

    Default Lets talk mountain bikes

    Hey all I am looking for some info from those of you that use mountain bikes as part of your hunting gear.

    More specifically I am looking for info on the bikes you use and any other equipment you use for hauling gear.

    I have not been into any serious mountain biking as of yet.

    Are there a specific type of tires you use?
    Trailers?
    Any attachments for carrying gear?

    If you could pass any tips along for this type of transport what would it be?

    Thanks for any and all info

    Jason

  2. #2
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Ketchikan, Alaska
    Posts
    2,032

    Default

    IMG_0442.jpgI use a hardtail MTB. It's a high end Joe Breezer bike with XTR components and a 80mm front shock. I've taken the top off my old burley kid hauler and strap my gear onto that for my ride. I used it a few times this last fall for deer hunting. I would boat up a deep bay, bike over a two mile hill and paddle up a five mile lake then climb into the alpine. The bike worked really well on the return because I didn't have to carry the game back. Blowing down that hill and no longer carrying the weight was nice. So was the kayaking in that regard. It sounds like alot but really utilizing the bike and kayak to cover the distance is pleasurable and breaks up the movements.

    I like the Burley trailer the low attachement to the rear triangle is very nice. They also have a low profile and excellent wheel construction. This was use on a gravel road in fairly good repair.

    The kayak was a Current Designs Pachena DX in Kevlar. I've also got a double person inflatable I still have stashed at the lake for solo adventures.

  3. #3
    Member elksnout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    McMinnville Or
    Posts
    53

    Default Mtn Bike

    I've got a Trek bike I use here in Oregon, I bought an aluminum game cart, welded up a 24" tongue that bolts to the cart with a sleeved bracket that uses the seat rod to pull the cart. Works great, but think I'm going to put reg bike tires on it for a better/quieter ride. Have pics, but don't know how to load on this site yet.

  4. #4
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    13,391

    Default

    If you're going to be riding on a narrow trail, it's hard to beat the Bob trailers for carrying gear. It's a single wheel design and thus will track really nicely with your bike on single track trails. If you've got wider trails like what Bighorse describes above, though, then a dual wheel trailer will likely carry more weight.

  5. #5
    Member ninefoot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    alaska, all over the state
    Posts
    986

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bighorse View Post
    IMG_0442.jpgI use a hardtail MTB. It's a high end Joe Breezer bike with XTR components and a 80mm front shock. I've taken the top off my old burley kid hauler and strap my gear onto that for my ride. I used it a few times this last fall for deer hunting. I would boat up a deep bay, bike over a two mile hill and paddle up a five mile lake then climb into the alpine. The bike worked really well on the return because I didn't have to carry the game back. Blowing down that hill and no longer carrying the weight was nice. So was the kayaking in that regard. It sounds like alot but really utilizing the bike and kayak to cover the distance is pleasurable and breaks up the movements.

    I like the Burley trailer the low attachement to the rear triangle is very nice. They also have a low profile and excellent wheel construction. This was use on a gravel road in fairly good repair.

    The kayak was a Current Designs Pachena DX in Kevlar. I've also got a double person inflatable I still have stashed at the lake for solo adventures.
    thats kinda neat bighorse...i daresay using a bike to hunt has never even crossed my mind. kinda cool. were there existing trails or did ya just boondock?

  6. #6
    Member kahahawai's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    2,443

    Default

    I used a mountain bike last season for my archery moose hunt several times and some just walking in depending where I accessed. I was hunting on the DM424 tag which is a non-motorized area on Ft Rich/Arctic valley. Theres some good trails in there, that are penetrable. But to tell you it is very doable, I could get pretty high up in elevation as long as you have the Leg strength for it. My bike is geared for softer trails due to my knobby tires. I also used a Badlands Daypack with bow holder strapped to my back with a few calls for moose water, food and other gear.

    The specs on my Mtn Bike:
    Gary Fisher ,21 speed "Tassjara" Hardtail
    Bontrager front suspension and Cranks/gears
    weight: 25 pounds 13 Ounces

  7. #7
    Member akrstabout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    2,291

    Default

    grouse sheep 029.jpgThe 29ers are about all you see any more, very nice ride and easy riding bikes. Climbes really well and just takes a bit to get used to. They are like monster trucks of the bike world. Mine sat 5" then my old bike that had a larger frame. I don't think my trailer is fully in the pic. But I have the bob for the 29er. My Kona was the last year that made with this frame at this price, very nice and I love the thing! Scandium frame. Can't remember what it weighs, just over 22# I believe. Used for my eklutna sheep hunt in Sept of 2010. Sorry I have not responded to your PM yet. Is your tag the sept or oct hunt?

  8. #8
    Member akrstabout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    2,291

    Default

    There is a guy who rents BOB trailers in town. He worked at Speedway Cycles when I bought my bike. I bought my trailer thru REI when they had a sale on and got free shipping, then ordered the 29er fork for it online. The regular bob says it will fit 700cc bikes, but those are road bikes, which have the same rims as a 29er, but won't fit the 29er cause of all the extra rubber of a mtn bike tire. Employees at REI didn't understand. I still came out ahead, sold the fork online for what I paid for the new one! So if you have to go that route to get one its cool. But now the 29ers are the norm and everybody should understand now.

    My bike is 27 speed and flat out hauls when I want it to!

  9. #9
    Premium Member Wyo2AK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Spenard
    Posts
    1,232

    Default

    I have no idea what a 29er is.

    Anyway, I have a crappy old bright blue Mongoose bike. I think it's an 18 speed or 21 speed, and it won't shift into the lowest gears when it's really cold out. I commute on it to work. I ride it on trails. It's a bike.

    Between scouting and hunting I used it a lot on my DS141 Eklutna hunt. I bought some chariot type trailer on craigslist for $50 bucks. It worked fine hauling my pack on scouting trips and all my girl and I's gear on the actual hunt.



    I got a full season out of it. I loaned it to some friends last year for a DC001 Kenai caribou hunt. I haven't seen it since then, but I hear it's in pretty rough shape. I think they owe me at least $20. It got loaded down pretty heavy and didn't handle it well. Anyway, it worked out for my purposes. They also rented a couple of the single-wheel bob trailers, maybe from REI?, and they worked out pretty slick, at least from what I hear.





    I think bikes can be pretty useful in the right circumstances. If I ever draw early Delta that'll be the route I take. Maybe with my blue Mongoose.
    Pursue happiness with diligence.

  10. #10
    Member AK Wonderer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    717

    Default

    I did the Kenai Mtn caribou hunt down the Resurrection trail a few years ago on bike without a trailer but would not go trailerless again. I had a rear rack that would support 20 lbs and the rest of the weight went in my pack. Going in wasn't too bad but coming out with an animal I was way to top heavy and on muddy windy trails you can't control where you're going much less stopping. Ended up loading the bikes with all we could then walking the bikes out, which was better than having it all on your back. The trailer keeps the weight near the ground giving you much better control and will be much safer. The BOB trailer is nice for narrow trails because it's narrower than a kid's tow stroller. Most kid carriers will work well and aren't much wider than your handle bars. So you should be able to use your handle bars as a guage and if your handle bars can fit easily between the trees thern you carrier should fit as well. Hit up Craigslist or Alaskaslist and you may find a cheep kid carrier.

    I have to agree that if your looking to buy a new bike the 29er is the way to go. Bought a Gary Fisher x-Caliber 29er about this time last year and wow that thing is awesome. The 29ers climb hills better than the 24" and maintain better speed. Hauled my daughter around all summer in a Chariot tow behind stroller. I wouldn't hesitate to haul that Chariot down the trail hunting.

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Olympia, WA
    Posts
    433

    Default

    Thanks all, couple more questions.

    akrstabout I have the Sep tag.

    What is a 29er? is that the size of the tires? Also a hardtail? Does that mean it has no shock system in the back?
    I havent done much research on the bikes, but will try to get into them when I get back. In Fairbanks I assume Beaver sports is about the only place to buy a decent bike.

    Would I be better to go to Anchorage or is there pretty good buys in Fairbanks?

    From those of you that ride, what would you look for when buying?

    Would I be able to stay under 1000 and come out with a good quality nice riding, decent handling bike?

    Brands??

    I dont want to even try go top of the line. I mean I will ride it, and want to use it when I move to ND to ride to work and what not(maybe it will come in handy while hunting Mulies in the badlands, hhmmmm), but I wouldnt really get the full benifit of an expensive mountain bike.

    Again
    Thanks all.

  12. #12
    Member AK Wonderer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    717

    Default

    29er means 29 inch rims. The old standard was 24 inch.

    Hardtail means no shock in the back. I changed from a full suspension (shock in back) 24" to a hardtail 29er last year and have zero regrets. Unless your doing alot of rough downhill a full suspension isn't necessary. A full suspension will cost alot more as well. You can decent 29er for under $1K but won't be able to touch a decent full suspension 29er for that price.

    For brands: Gary Fisher, Kona, Trek, Novara, Jamis. I sure I missed a couple others. Hop on a couple of different bikes and brands, they all have a slightly different geometry which will change the feel and comfort.

    What to look for? The quality of the components is what will drive the price of a bike up. If you find a couple bikes you like in your price range then take a look at the componentry specs. You'll probably have to pull up the component manufacturers website (ie. Shimano) to see how the components on that bike fall in thier lineup. I think a high quality derailers are very important. Hydraulic disk breaks are also a very nice option. Of course you can always upgrade components after the fact.

    If you find a couple bikes you like you can post them up on here and we could help you work through the components further. I'm not a bike expert but I'm sure there are some bike nuts on here who could really help dial you in.

  13. #13
    Member RainGull's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    The S.E. of the N.W.
    Posts
    950

    Default

    I think you mean 26" not 24". There are still a lot of 26-ers out there. They definately have their advantages over the 29'ers, especially for shorter folk who don't like kicking their tries on technical stuff, sitting lower on downhills, quicker steering etc... The debate definately isn't over. It's a personal choice as are fat tire bikes like the Surly, Mukluk and others. I'm 5'8" with size 10.5 feet and prefer a 26"wheel for technical stuff and a 29'r for the less technical. Heck I like riding a 20" bmx bike still... Definately a place for all of it.
    Science has a rich history of proving itself wrong.

  14. #14
    Member AK Wonderer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    717

    Default

    Ah yes, 26" is correct. I was wondering why it looked funny as I was typing it.

    Rain Gull raises a good point, if you're a short person you may not fit too well on a 29er. I'm 5'8" and do just fine but my 5'1" wife would have lots of problems.

    The 29er would make a good cross over bike for hitting the trail on the weekends then commuting to work mid week. The 29" rim is the standard for the skinny tired road bikes.

    The advantaged of a 26" are as Gull said, they perform better for technical riding and tight turns. They are also less expensive than a 29er with comparable components.

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Olympia, WA
    Posts
    433

    Default

    Ok then......so I just noticed the Mountain biking forum! ahahah

    Will post more questions there.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •