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Thread: spey fishing?

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    Default spey fishing?

    What teh heck is spey flyfishing? and what are spey rods, and what does it mean in general.....I've heard the name thrown around but never looked it up.
    Eccleasties 8:11 Because the sentence against an evil deed is not executed quickly, There for the hearts of the sons of men among them are given fully to do evil.

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    Member G_Smolt's Avatar
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    "Spey" is the now catch-all term that refers to a family of rods and casts. The modern accepted definition of a speyrod is one that is 11' 9" and longer and has an extended front grip, usually 13"-17" long, as well as an extended rear grip, usually 4" to 7" long. The spey family casts are casts that, unlike overhead casts, do not employ false casts or aerial backward loops.
    The foundational spey cast is called the switch cast, and it performed by lifting and sweeping the line back above the surface and repositioning into an energized D-loop, followed by an aerial forward loop.
    Spey-family casts are characterized best (and semi-inaccurately, but that's a whoooole 'nother discussion) as "dynamic roll casts"

    Here is an example of a single spey cast. It is done with a "switch rod" which is a rod that can be used as both a speycasting rod and an overhead casting rod - this is part of a series I did that will hopefully be released this year.

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    Thanks, that was really help ful. if you dont have the false casts, how do you get your line out there? I'm not very good at regular fly fishing either, so bear with me
    Eccleasties 8:11 Because the sentence against an evil deed is not executed quickly, There for the hearts of the sons of men among them are given fully to do evil.

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    Member CTobias's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FurFishGame View Post
    Thanks, that was really help ful. if you dont have the false casts, how do you get your line out there? I'm not very good at regular fly fishing either, so bear with me
    The rod does all the work and for the most part it's very fancy roll casting. The new lines are designed with a lot of weight up front to make turning over big flies easier. There are a lot of people who use long belly lines and don't "shoot" line like you do with a scandinavian or skagit setup. But instead implore the line lift method. Basically if you can lift the long belly line up off the water and still have a good anchor point you can cast all the line that is off the tip of the rod. Long belly lines have a gradual taper where as a scandinavian line has a shorter and fatter taper but thins out much more than a skagit style line which is basically a butt load of grain weight in a short section of line with no tapper at all. See below images for better detail.


    Long Belly Taper



    Scandinavian Taper



    Skagit Taper



    Skagit and Scandinavian lines are used when there is minimal room behind you and you have to create the most amount of energy to shoot the line in a tight space. Skagit style casting was developed in the PNW on the Skagit River, hence the name. It was also developed to chuck whole chickens (intruders). The large grain weight was needed to turn over very large lead eye flies.

    I'm sure a lot of these terms are another language, but spey casting is much more exciting and requires less work. Plus a lot of people are picking up spey rods because even a beginner spey caster can put 50-60' of line out on a cast after only practicing for a couple hours. Especially with a skagit setup which allows you to shoot the line quite far.

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    that is not clear at all but I'll act like I know what your talkin about HAHA ok, only parially kidding.
    Eccleasties 8:11 Because the sentence against an evil deed is not executed quickly, There for the hearts of the sons of men among them are given fully to do evil.

  6. #6
    Member CTobias's Avatar
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    From http://www.flyfishusa.com/lines/About_Spey_Fishing.html


    Two-Hand fly rods are powered with both hands. These
    rods are commonly 12' to 15' long. This extra length gives the angler the
    advantage of being able to present and control the fly at longer ranges and
    greater depths than with shorter single-hand fly rods. For these reasons,
    two-hand rods are very popular with anglers fishing large salmon and steelhead
    rivers.

    Two-Hand fly rods come in two types; those designed for over head
    casting and those designed specifically for change of direction roll
    casting, ie. Spey Casting .

    The first type is called an "Overhead
    Rod". They are usually designed with a very fast taper and stiff butt and excel
    when fishing wide-open water. They are most often used with shooting-head type
    fly lines.

    The second type is commonly called the "Spey Rod". These rods are
    designed with more moderate actions to facilitate timing and loading during Spey
    casting. Since our river banks are usually vegetated to the shoreline, Spey Rods
    have become very popular in our area (Pacific Northwest, USA).


    Many types of fly lines can be used with Spey
    Rods. Double taper fly lines were most popular in the past. They still give the
    angler the ability to cast without having to adjust line length. With a double
    taper line it is easy to mend line at very long distances. However almost no one
    uses double taper lines any more because weight-forward taper Spey lines are
    much easier to use.

    Modern graphite Spey rods
    shoot line better than older rods made from other materials. For this reason
    weight-forward Spey lines open up new fishing areas where back-cast room is very
    limited. These kinds of lines also handle larger flies and sinking tip lines,
    which opens up even more water. In recent times, the head lengths on the most
    popular Spey lines are getting shorter.

    Spey Rods become most effective when combined with
    custom tailored "changeable-tip fly lines." These lines are designed to deliver
    a wide range of tip sizes and perform at both long and short range. A complete
    system should allow an angler to fish from the surface to depths of more than
    five feet in steelhead currents. This type of line also allows an angler to
    carry a wide range of both floating and sinking lines without having to carry
    extra reel spools. Instead the tips are carried in a soft wallet. This system
    has a real advantage for saving weight and bulk when hiking or
    wading.

    There is some confusion about which line is best
    with which rod and in what situation. Listed within this "Spey Line Section"
    are the lines, which have become most popular in our region. Specifications are
    listed for each one. And our staff has tested each of them many days under field
    conditions.

    There is little doubt that there is a magic line
    which will fit your favorite rod and will suite your casting style better than
    all others. Such a line should help you adapt as fishing situations change on
    the water you are fishing. There is also no doubt that this magic line will
    perform better and better as you acquire good casting skills. There are a number
    of valid approaches to spey casting. If you want to get good, study and practice
    are the surest procedures. Professional
    casting instruction
    is by far the easiest way to learn. The video
    tutorials
    offered within this site are fundamental research material. You
    can never know too much.

  7. #7

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    check out steelheadbum.com, specifically the spey pages. there are 6 pages that will walk you through a really helpful set of information

    http://www.steelheadbum.com/store/pc...t.asp?idpage=5

  8. #8

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    great thread! If any one wants a video on spey casting I have 2 of mel kreigers. (bought the 2nd by accident).

    YOu can spey cast with a one handed rod....not familiar with switch rods but it makes me think of 'brush' bows when it comes to traditional bowhunting. Another catch to get ya to buy something. My 10' 6wt is capable if the caster would get off his butt and learn to do it better!

    That video caster is throwing some TIIIIGHT loops!!! shew.

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    Member ak_logan's Avatar
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    Anyone on the peninsula that throws a 2 handed wanna meet and let me give it a whirl? Would like to get a set up but would like to give it a shot before I go in and drop a few hundred dollars

  11. #11

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    drifter shot you a reply.

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