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Thread: What new ideas have you "drummed" up

  1. #1
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    Default What new ideas have you "drummed" up

    I seem to always be thinking about a new way to do things, especially when talking about bear baiting. I've tried the standard 55 gallon drum w/ a large hole cut mid way down. I've tried snap-ring open top drums w/ a small feed trough welded at the bottom. I've tried 15 to 30 gallon s-r open tops, cut multiple smaller holes around it. One year I used a 6-7 gal open top suspended from a tree. Most recently I've gone to an 85 gallon steel overpack w/ the idea that I can bait it early and leave it longer.
    I've used chain and straps to secure drums to trees. I've shoved them under heavy logs and wedged them. I've used heavy swivels on the bottom w/ a length of chain attached to a tree so they could be moved by the bears easily.
    I've had some ideas that I have not put to use, partly cause that would require more energy on my part, partly cause I don't weld in some cases.
    Ideas I'd share, silly or not:
    1- Use a 1/4" cable and attach it horizontally to 2 trees up high enough that you could winch a drum up off the ground. Use a pulley in the middle, and a pulley at one tree. Mount a boat trailer hand winch on that tree at the base, and run the line through both pulleys. Set up the drum so it could be filled on the ground, then hoisted up. How high? My idea was high enough that ravens and other small creatures could not get a free meal. I'd put the bottom up about 3-4'.
    2- Modify a drum into a food hopper similar to what they use for deer. Cut out the bottom and build an upside down cone w/ a system on the bottom like teh bottom of a bird feeder or water trough for rodents. You could not use this for doughnuts and such, but it might work for dog food, grain, and c.o.b. Either mount it high on a tree, or suspend it like I was describing earlier. I was thinking that suspending it might help the bears to keep knocking the food down if it got plugged up inside.
    A positive about suspending a barrel is that the big boys would have a hard time destroying drums. Bad part is they might like swinging on them and tear them down.
    There are a couple of ideas for you to mull over and discuss. I'm sure you all have some dandy ones. A guy like Iron Artist would make short work of a project like I'm describing w/ the food hopper.
    What other crazy ideas have you simply just thought about, or actually tried? Here is a chance to see what people have thought of, tried, R&D, and been successful w/ or not. It is also a chance to maybe point out some modifications to another idea, or share that the idea was tried and failed for specific reasons.
    And yes, in part I'm trying to hold off going wood cutting, it's cold out.
    ARR

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    Member akcrewdog's Avatar
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    I'm actually going to try something new this year...

    Planing on using small but durable chain. Puncturing a hole about a foot down from the top beneath one of the bung holes. Running the chain through the bung hole and the hole I punctured and then locking the free end of the chain back to itself near the top of the drum. When suspended from a heavy branch or over hung tree the barrel would hand sort of crooked. I'm also thinking about 4 feet off the ground. The hole for getting at the bait will be cut in the top about 6 inches from the bottom side. This will allow the bears to get some bait, but they will really have to work to get it all out of there.

    I usually just secure it to the tree, but they eat me out of house and home. Even though I use popcorn and jello powder for flavor, it is still a pain to have to fill up the barrel every other day. The area I bait in has lots of brown bears too, so I am hoping that this will prevent them from destroying my barrels. If nothing else it will be awesome to watch the play tether ball with it. Rather than monkey stomp it like last year! Well that is the plan anyway...

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    I am going with the ground mount with a chain again and hope I dont get monkey stomped. gonna try alot of cake mix hope the bears like fun fetti cake mix I have a ton of it and some out of date frozen meats to start and when it gets warmer going with dog food and cooking grease.. but until then I hope the Fun Fetti and 60 lbs of coffee beans attract them in (never tried coffee beans but it is hazelnut flavored :P ) It might look like a starbucks for bears after a few weeks

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    Member jcorwin4278's Avatar
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    Heres one that I am going to try this year. Once the season is over I will give you all an update. Here is my idea, take a piece of 4" black pvc pipe about 3' long. Glue a cap on one end and drill holes all over it ( I'm thinking 1" holes). Run a 3/8" cable (or whatever you think would work) and run it through the top holes. Then put on a screw on top so you can fill it. Either you can hang it from a tree or on on the ground and make them work for the food. I think this would work to keep bears around when your "bait" runs out.
    Hunt until you don't like it any more

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    We used to do something like that in the lower 48 when hunting hogs. Take a piece of PVC about 6 feet long and drill holes all over it and fill it with corn, cap the ends so you can refill. When they roll it all over the corn will fall out and it will keep them coming back time and time again. I imagine it would work with bear too, just have to find something small enough to fall out of the holes. Just dont know how it will hold up if a nice size one bites into it.

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    Member fshgde's Avatar
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    As for the pvc I see one having to spend a lot of time cleaning up plastic shards!! I had a bear chew down a tree like a beaver a couple of years ago to get to a hanging scent ball. I saw her working on it and a couple of days later it was down about 8 inch diameter tree.
    They can be determined.

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    Member akrstabout's Avatar
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    I would use ABS not PVC. ABS I have drove into frozen ground with pile driver! Drove ABS around steel pilings to keep lake muck from potentially heaving the dock. Pretty impressive, it only shattered if I got out of plumb, the sideways pressure killed it. The pile driver hits with 3500# I think!

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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    I still think a big bear could bite through it......pvc OR abs......

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    Finally! I thought I started a bust here but you guys started talking at least. Hanging drums and coffe, I like it! The pipe idea is intriguing. If a guy were hiking in, he could take it in 2 or 3 pieces, then glue it together when on site. When coming out, he could cut it up again. Seems I see lots of scrap laying around here and there, shouldn't cost much to try.
    A guy might have to do some math to see how many gallons 4" PVC/ABS per foot. I wonder how hard it would be to find larger diameter, and how much that would weigh? Interesting thought there.
    Thanks for sharing guys,
    ARR

  10. #10
    Member aces-n-eights's Avatar
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    My wife and i baited for the first time last spring and she was fortunate to connect on a nice 6' blackie. Here's what we did... pretty simple set-up... we tossed a tire over a 4' high stump on the edge of a clearing. We visited the site every 4-5 days and we would mix dog food and molasses and stuff that inside the tire. The bears are not smart enough to lift the tire off the stump and it drove them crazy getting at the food.

    Our routine was to ATV in close to our site, walk about 1/2mile to the site, bait the tire, switch the card out of the game cam, walk back to the ATV, motor back the way we came, park the ATV, walk to our tree stand across the clearing (kind of a back route in, away from the bait), fire up the Thermocell, review the game cam pics on our pocket camera and wait for a bear.

    The game cam gave us a lot of good info on when the bears visited... usually morning and evening... and sometimes not too long after we baited the site. Our first visitor was a sow with two cubs and they hit the site within two days of setup. It was nice to know there were cubs in the area so we could be careful about not taking those guys. We think the bear my wife got chased off the sow.

    We plan to do the same thing this year. We may stack two or three tires over the stump to be able to pack more food inside. The nice thing with the tire trick is that it is fairly easy to lug in a tire - or two- and lug back out at the end of the season.

    Good luck all!
    English is an odd language. It can understood through tough thorough thought, though.

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    Aces just came up w/ an idea I'd never thought of. Any chance you have photos of the set up? I think I get it, but it'd be nice to see it. My problem is I can't get there but maybe once a week late in the season, so my food has to last that long. Interesting idea though.
    ARR

  12. #12
    Member aces-n-eights's Avatar
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    Here's a couple of pics... The first you can see the tire over the stump just left of the center of the pic. One downside is that it does not hold a lot of food. As i said above, we may use 2 or 3 tires this year...


    Please excuse my poor artistry... The second is a diagram of our site. We ATV in from the truck to position 1, park and walk in to the site. We do NOT try to be quiet - we want the bears to associate our noise with "food on the table"! We walk back to the ATV and drive to position 2, park and quietly walk to the tree stand. We want the bears to think we have left the area.



    Hope this helps! Good luck!Bear bait.jpgBear bait.jpg
    English is an odd language. It can understood through tough thorough thought, though.

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    Member Mountain Man Jack's Avatar
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    Apparently that bear thought there were booby traps set up near the bait. That's funny.
    Neat idea though. Pretty simple.

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    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
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    River Rat,
    To figure Gallons Per Foot for the PVC;
    Take the ID squared divided by 1029 = BBLS per foot. Take that and multiply it by 42 and you will have Gallons per foot.
    For Example....4" pipe ID = 16/1029=.0155 bbls/ft X 42 = 0.65 gallons per foot.
    BK

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    That is not much volume is it? 8" pipe would be 2.6 gal/ft (I just saw some for sale on C-List). That still is not much. 4" pipe would be light to take in, fast to set up, if a guy was doing some prospecting for hits (w/ bait station permits of course) You could carry 2 sites worth of pipe on one atv, w/ food, and go like gangbusters. Once you got a hit, bring in a barrel. No hit, just grab the pipe, tape the hole, and go to a new spot. Hmm
    ARR

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