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Thread: 375 H&H Loads for black bear and Griz/Brownies and Goat...

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    Member kahahawai's Avatar
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    Default 375 H&H Loads for black bear and Griz/Brownies and Goat...

    I been looking at bullets for black bear and griz, I was thinking of going with 235 gr. Barnes TSX, 260 Gr. Nosler Accubonds, or the 270 gr. Barnes TSX.

    Trying to get a good load similar to what Double Tap Ammo has got... they are getting 3100 fps with the 235 gr and 2795 fps with the 270 Gr Barnes TSX's . the Accubonds are flying 2900 fps.

    what powder would you go with?

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    Make sure to check the barrel lenght of the rifle being tested in the book. I have noticed that I they tend to use longer barrels then the average hunter use's. If I where you I would load up 270 and see what it likes and just kill everything with it. The animals will not notice if the bullet is 150FPS slower.

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    Member marshall's Avatar
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    Those are huge numbers that you have posted. I would like to see actual chronograph data shot out of typical 375H&H hunting rifle with those production loads.

    I like the 260gr Accubond and the 270gr TSX. RL-15 is a fine powder in that cartridge but those numbers are faster than I've seen with my eyes.

    I've used RL-17 in the 375 Ruger with great success but I haven't had an opportunity to test it in the 375H&H. It burns similar burn to 4350 with better velocity numbers and 4350 is a good 375H&H powder.

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    Member spoiled one's Avatar
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    I am shooting the 270 g TSX with 72.5 g of reloader 15. My model 70 is cut and crowned at 20" and it really likes them. It likes anything I have shot through it actually. The 270 TSX really puts a hurt on critters.
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

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    Member kahahawai's Avatar
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    Yeah I know, but thats what they listed for Double Tap Ammo....

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    I think the 260 Accubond is a great "all-around" bullet, but for griz I would want a 300 grain, either the Swift A-frame or the Nosler Partition.

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    Member kahahawai's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by drow View Post
    I think the 260 Accubond is a great "all-around" bullet, but for griz I would want a 300 grain, either the Swift A-frame or the Nosler Partition.

    I thought about the heavier bullets too, but just wanted to reduce some recoil, along with gaining a little more range...some say this Sako 85 kicks pretty good...the rifle is brand new and I have not shot it yet.

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    Having seen the effects of the 260 NAB I'd shoot any NA animal (grizzly or otherwise) with it from a 375 H&H.
    Esse quam videri

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    I shot a couple of moose with the 250 TTSX. One mine, one as back up. It flies good and accurate out of my 375 Ruger with RL 15 and should also out of the HH. I was using the 270 TSX, it was also good and accurate. I have not used a chrony on the 250 TTSX, the 270 was about 2800 fps or more as memory serves me. I am quite sure the TTSX is faster, it shot about 3 or more inches higher at 200 yards. I went with the 250 TTSX for increased point blank range. Glad I did since the backup shot was a moose running quartering away 150-200 yards away. If I was for sure going for grizz, then the 270 or 300 TSX. I have seen two black bears and one moose shot with the 375 using Hornady cup and core stuff. Very large wounds with massive bullet fragments. Very dead critters with a couple of broken pelvis bones. I would rather the bullet hold together better, so I went with the copper ones. If I was starting over, I might try RL 17 instead of RL 15, but 15 has been superb with two loads so far. Not sure of temperature sensitivity, that might sway me toward a different powder. There is not specific data for the 250 TTSX. I extrapolated between the 235 and 270 from data in the Barnes manual. Good luck.

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    I like the 260AB in my .375 Ruger...those DT numbers are pretty over the top though and I wonder how much "blue sky" they have in them.

    After shooting several things with various ABs, I'd use them on everything. In fact I've yet to recover a bullet. If the rifle likes TSXs then they do fine to.
    "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

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    Quote Originally Posted by kahahawai View Post
    I thought about the heavier bullets too, but just wanted to reduce some recoil, along with gaining a little more range...some say this Sako 85 kicks pretty good...the rifle is brand new and I have not shot it yet.
    Since you have not fired the rifle yet, try both the 300 grain and the 260/270 grain bullets. Go with what is the most accurate from your rifle.

    I seriously doubt you will be able to tell any difference in recoil between the different weight projectiles. After all, the difference in weight from the lightest to the heaviest in the 375 H&H caliber is only the weight of a regular 22 rimfire bullet.
    NRA Life Member since 1974

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    Either the 250 or 270 grain X bullet will kill about any thing this world has to offer.

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    Got my first 375 H&H in the later 70's. It was a model 70 push feed made (by Serial number) made in 1964. Just my luck. Anyhow I have acquired a few more in this caliber so I have some years hunting experience with this caliber. Here's what I have shot for years and never had a failure. Not to say that the newer designed bullets aren't as good or that the newer powders won't work up some higher velocities but on the other hand not sure more is needed or even desirable. Brass is usually range pickup so cases are mixed, always full length sized and trimmed to proper length since I load for more than one rifle. CCI mag primers,
    IMR 4064 and any 270 spire point cup and core made by Hornady, Speer or Sierra. Use them all through the years and all work just fine. Depending on the gun velocity ( used a chronograph at 15 feet ) was 2750 +/-. My old winny, 20 inch barrel is somewhat slower but I don't have the exact number. Zero at 300 yards puts everything out to 350 yards in your point blank range. Shot black/brown bear moose bou and blacktails with these loads and so far everything has been dead. I did have a real agitated moose make about 100 yards before he fell over. PM me if you want the powder charge but you can find the range in any good loading book and you will probably want to tune the load for your particular rifle anyway.

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    Premium Member shphtr's Avatar
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    I handload for several 375 Wbys, one of them for over 20 years. I load them pretty hot and chrono everything I shoot ... those loads match or exceed any vel's that I have ever gotten for any of the 375 Improved that I have. As an aside I had a gunsmith friend that was determined to find out the best barrel length for his 375 Improved. He started with a 30" barrel and chronographed three rounds. He then cut 1" off the barred, crowned the end and using the same lot of bullets and powder chronographed another 3 rounds. He continued doing this until the barrel was 19" long. From 30" to 20" he lost a TOTAL of 25 fps. From 20" to 19" he lost another 19 fps. Based on these results he replaced the barrel with a new 20" barrel. My fastest loads for a 270 gr. was with IMR 4064 at just over 2800 fps.
    "Actions speak louder than words - 'nough said"

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    Member Matt's Avatar
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    I'd get a box of 270gr TSX bullets and a couple lbs of RL-15 powder. I had zero fuss with those two components for a 375 Ruger and 375 H&H that I reloaded for.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kahahawai View Post
    I been looking at bullets for black bear and griz, I was thinking of going with 235 gr. Barnes TSX, 260 Gr. Nosler Accubonds, or the 270 gr. Barnes TSX.

    Trying to get a good load similar to what Double Tap Ammo has got... they are getting 3100 fps with the 235 gr and 2795 fps with the 270 Gr Barnes TSX's . the Accubonds are flying 2900 fps.


    what powder would you go with?
    Yes K,

    Be very weary of what Double Tap claims for velocity. I was unaware at the time, but almost always, Double Tap never lives up to their advertised velocity. By all means, buy a box of those bullets and run them over my chronograph (I'll let you borrow it if you promise not to shoot a hole in the display screen). Regardless of barrel length, the chrony don't lie, but double tap usually does. Took me a long while to develop high-power loads that will live up to my advertised velocity (usually confirmed by other forum members).

    If you are looking for that type of velocity, I'd consider a powder that's a bit slower than reloader 15. With reloader 15 you might see pressure signs before a full case. With Reloader 19, you might run out of capacity before getting the velocity you're after. With reloader 17, it's game time! RL 17 have a very smooth burn, and is highly touted by many reloaders.

    matnaggewinu


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    Member kahahawai's Avatar
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    Thanks Mainer, I will try the RL 17.....I do like RL 19, its what I use in my other calibers, but have noticed its pretty hot !!!
    I also heard there was a recall on a good number ( not sure the lot #) of Double tap ammo, basically I just heard good things from them until then, and by reading there velocities seem to be unsurpassed.

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    Member kahahawai's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by .338 mag. View Post
    Either the 250 or 270 grain X bullet will kill about any thing this world has to offer.

    I would probably load a heavier or the heaviest bullet for the 375H&H when it comes to Cape buff, rhino, hippo, and Elephant.....

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    Chuck-

    Just read your post. I shoot 4 different 375 rounds (375 H&H 375 AI and 2ea 375 Ultra Mags) and some advise on these round, don't push the limit on them. I never push any of my rifles, if I want more/bigger I buy the next size caliber/case size up. Rifles last longer, and brass life last significantly longer if you keep them at Max or below.

    These standards I keep with all of my rifles that I use on NON Dangerous game. If I am using the rifle for any of the bears in AK, I ALWAYS keep my rifle WELL UNDER MAX. I go with a mid range load that is ALWAYS 100% reliable, safe, and shoots well. Especially in a standard H&H you can get very good accuracy with the mid range loads using medium burn rate powders (H4895 and Varget; these are my favorites, they flow well through a powder measure and they are temp insensitive and Varget's burn rate falls right between RL 15 and RL 17).

    I would never even consider using Double Tap ammo or try to achieve their "advertised" velocity. You are just asking for issues with reliability when ammo is pushed to the absolute top end. Not to mention I don't believe there advertised velocities but I do believe they are pushing the limit into a very dangerous area both for rifle reliability and wear/tear on your equipment.

    That 270gr Barnes TSX is my favorite bullet in the 375 H&H and you won't be over or under gunned hunting anything short of Elephants/Rhinos and Hippos. My next would be the 300gr version or the 300gr Nosler Partions.

    If you want to keep the good trajectories, go with a good Leupold or Swaro scope with there custom BDC's on them. No these scopes won't change your trajectories, but they will allow you to just dial the exact range, and velocity/trajectory won't really matter. I use them on all my scopes with great success.

    Again keep your loads in the mid range area on these dangerous game rifles.

    My load for my 375 H&H:
    270gr Barnes TSX, 66grs Varget, Fed 215 Primer, 3.585" OAL, Velocity 2627 FPS
    This is out of a Win 70 CRF with a factory Winchester barrel cut back to 22"

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    Member Double Shovel's Avatar
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    Kahahawai,

    I'm really enjoying my Sako Kodiak 375H&H! I've used it for two season's now and I seem to reach for it more often than anything else. I also enjoy reloading and have settled on the 260 Gr Nosler AccuBond and RL-17 for an all-around load. Last spring I joined a good friend during his Kodiak bear hunt. He was armed with a 375 Ruger and I with the Sako 375 H&H as backup. We handloaded the 260 NAB for both rifles (both about 2750 FPS MV) with very good results. We recovered one bullet after breaking both front shoulders and penetrating to the offside hide - shot distance about 100 yards (see attached photos - my hunting parner with his bear). I wouldn't hesitate to use this load on anything in AK. In fact, I've taken two caribou with this round with clean, quick kills and nearly no meat loss. Good luck with your choice and enjoy that Kodiak! I'm in Wasilla too - shoot me a PM if you need any more specifics on the load or that rifle..

    DS
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