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Thread: Homemade PVC frame shrimp pot

  1. #1

    Default Homemade PVC frame shrimp pot

    Hey guys I will be doing some recreational shrimping in the whittier canal this april for the first time. Is there any regs restricting pvc framed shrimp traps? they will be wrapped with 1 inch netting and will be weighted down to the floor. I haven't come across any regs on what material is legal.

  2. #2

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    Mesh size and escapement areas are well covered in the regs


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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Are you using a motorized puller, anchor buouy, or pulling by hand? If using a motorized puller and especially an anchor puller I'd be concerned that you could end up breaking a pvc frame.

    The regs don't specify frame material, so nothing wrong with pvc from a reg standpoint.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    Are you using a motorized puller, anchor buouy, or pulling by hand? If using a motorized puller and especially an anchor puller I'd be concerned that you could end up breaking a pvc frame.

    The regs don't specify frame material, so nothing wrong with pvc from a reg standpoint.

    Thanks. I was just wondering about the frame material. I'll be pulling them up by hand unfortunately...

  5. #5

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    If you don't have your mind set on PVC, I wonder if a frame made of copper tubing would be sturdier. Should be pretty easy putting the pieces together. I have a dipnet frame made of copper tubing and it's surprisingly strong.

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    Why not go to a second hand store and buy a cheap wire animal cage and cover it with the 1" mesh. Then you just have to make the openings.

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  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by skydiver View Post
    If you don't have your mind set on PVC, I wonder if a frame made of copper tubing would be sturdier. Should be pretty easy putting the pieces together. I have a dipnet frame made of copper tubing and it's surprisingly strong.
    funny you mentioned copper tubing because i was thinking the same thing last night after staring at the copper tubing in my heating closet heheh. I'll have to take a look at pricing before i make the final decision.

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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    I personally prefer to buy the pots made by a pro like potbuilder.
    That being said I could see a benefit to copper. You could fill the copper with lead to get the weight how you want it or close enough so as not to need quite so much added weights in your pots.
    I have never tried to fill pipe with lead but it has to be possible to some extent. And copper wouldn't wont want to float nearly as much as PVC.
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    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    At the price of copper right now you might be better off using GOLD.

    Why not use rebar?

    If you are pulling by hand look into getting a Scotty Trap Eeze pot puller it sure beats leaning over the side of the boat pulling straight up - and 40$ won't break the bank ----> http://www.go2marine.com/product/209...e&WT.mc_id=gb1

    I pull by hand. I used to pull 5 metal weighted pots, now we only put three on - unless my 22 yo son is with me!

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bullelkklr View Post
    At the price of copper right now you might be better off using GOLD.

    Why not use rebar?

    If you are pulling by hand look into getting a Scotty Trap Eeze pot puller it sure beats leaning over the side of the boat pulling straight up - and 40$ won't break the bank ----> http://www.go2marine.com/product/209...e&WT.mc_id=gb1

    I pull by hand. I used to pull 5 metal weighted pots, now we only put three on - unless my 22 yo son is with me!

    i was looking at rebar just now and it is relatively cheap but i have no way to cut it unless i rent a cutting tool. I may end up using galvanized steel rods that are 1/2" in diameter and is threaded all the way. This will allow me to add T connectors a bit easier. The lowes website doesnt show how much the rod weighs so i'll scoot over there on my lunch break this afternoon to take a closer look.

    http://www.lowes.com/pd_44849-53911-...rod&facetInfo=


    As for the Scotty Trap Eeze, I'm sure i can come up with something that looks similar. How much weight do you use to weigh the pots down?

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by kasilofchrisn View Post
    I personally prefer to buy the pots made by a pro like potbuilder.
    That being said I could see a benefit to copper. You could fill the copper with lead to get the weight how you want it or close enough so as not to need quite so much added weights in your pots.
    I have never tried to fill pipe with lead but it has to be possible to some extent. And copper wouldn't wont want to float nearly as much as PVC.

    I have no doubt that potbuilder has excellent pots. I would buy 4 or 5 of them right now if i had the dollars to spend. The wife however, would put me in the dungeon for a while if she found out i spent that much money on gear so i am keeping my budget at $100 .


    yes, the plan was to fill the pipes with lead to eliminate the need of an external weight.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    My family commercially fished shrimp in the Sound back in the 70s and 80s, and all of the pots we ran were homemade with a welded rebar frame. We still use them from time to time, and the weight of the pots is awfully nice for getting it to the bottom where you want them and keeping them there.

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SalmonSlut View Post
    i was looking at rebar just now and it is relatively cheap but i have no way to cut it unless i rent a cutting tool.
    (sic)
    Do you have a hacksaw? Rebar is fairly easy to cut, no need for a specialized cutter unless you are going into the foundation business.

    I've tried hand pulling twice, putting any kind of weight to get the pot down is a real PITA pulling by hand.

    Does your budget include the line and float? 600' of line and an A1 buoy is pretty much going to eat up your $100.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  14. #14

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    PVC would be cheapest. I would drill some holes along the pipe to let all the air out, and water in, as it sinks.

    You could also use electrical conduit. A lot cheaper than copper, and you can try using the typical conduit connectors used when connecting conduit for it's intended purpose. Plus, that stuff is heavy and would help it stay on the bottom.

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    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    I know that I am going to get slammed on this, but on my ladner's (round steel pots) I often do not weight them down at all. When I had some of potbuilders takedown square pots, I put a 20 inch section of 3/4 rebar in each one.

    Depending on the area I am shrimping, I sometimes put a 5 pound weight ahead of the pots about 10 feet to keep that on the bottom.

    You could use pretty small rebar I would think - you don't need them too heavy - just enough to stik them. I would say that 5 to 8 pounds per pot would be heavy enough. You could try some 3/8" rebar and see if that works. Just cut it with a hacksaw.

    Rebar bends easily enough - you could even make your own round ones.

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    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    You really need 2 people to take turns pulling the pot and working them into the boat when pulling by hand - unless you are pretty studly....

    We try to pull 3 times a day when we are focussing on shrimping. I am only running 3 pots on my string now as I sold my square pots and moved to ladners due to lack of space on my dinghy, er um, zodiac.

    You really need more than 600 foot of line IMO. I seem to do best when I am fishing in about 670ft out of PWS. I have 900 foot of line on my string with 3 pots (with 50 foot between pots) and I am bordeline long enough - I mean sure they hit bottom, but I don't have much scope if over 650 to the bottom.

    Use floating line on the bottom 200 foot and sinking for the rest.

  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bullelkklr View Post
    I know that I am going to get slammed on this, but on my ladner's (round steel pots) I often do not weight them down at all. When I had some of potbuilders takedown square pots, I put a 20 inch section of 3/4 rebar in each one.

    Depending on the area I am shrimping, I sometimes put a 5 pound weight ahead of the pots about 10 feet to keep that on the bottom.

    You could use pretty small rebar I would think - you don't need them too heavy - just enough to stik them. I would say that 5 to 8 pounds per pot would be heavy enough. You could try some 3/8" rebar and see if that works. Just cut it with a hacksaw.

    Rebar bends easily enough - you could even make your own round ones.

    i was thinking 10lbs would be good to hold it down. if 5lbs work, that would make it much easier on the arms .

  18. #18
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    We found that it isn't so much the weight of the pot that get you - it is the resistance of trying to pull them through the water. We go slow and as steady as possible. I think that we lose less shrimp that way - but we don't really know.

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bullelkklr View Post
    You really need 2 people to take turns pulling the pot and working them into the boat when pulling by hand - unless you are pretty studly....

    We try to pull 3 times a day when we are focussing on shrimping. I am only running 3 pots on my string now as I sold my square pots and moved to ladners due to lack of space on my dinghy, er um, zodiac.

    You really need more than 600 foot of line IMO. I seem to do best when I am fishing in about 670ft out of PWS. I have 900 foot of line on my string with 3 pots (with 50 foot between pots) and I am bordeline long enough - I mean sure they hit bottom, but I don't have much scope if over 650 to the bottom.

    Use floating line on the bottom 200 foot and sinking for the rest.
    hmm.. i was looking at dropping around the water fall across from the harbor at around the 400ft area. this is making me rethink my plans. how far do you normally go from the harbor in the zodiac? reason i ask is i've got a inflatable myself.

  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    Do you have a hacksaw? Rebar is fairly easy to cut, no need for a specialized cutter unless you are going into the foundation business.

    I've tried hand pulling twice, putting any kind of weight to get the pot down is a real PITA pulling by hand.

    Does your budget include the line and float? 600' of line and an A1 buoy is pretty much going to eat up your $100.
    i bought these to use as floats.

    Spongex CB-5 Float

    cb5-spongex-float_25.jpg

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