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Thread: Essential Kodak Bear Hunting Gear & Tactics.

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    Member KLNhunter's Avatar
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    Default Essential Kodak Bear Hunting Gear & Tactics.

    Okay, So I have the basics of a good knife, a good gun, a good pack, and good camping stuff. What else do I NEED for a successful bear hunt? Any suggestions of gear would be much appreciated. Along with any suggestions of tactics when hunting in the fall. Thanks!

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    Good binocs,... on a typical bear hunt I look through my binos atleast 50 minutes of every hour,you will want binos that dont cause too much eye strain that will leave to headaches and such.. Tactics...get up high and glass,glass,glass and then glass some more,have patience. Dont walk around too much in bear country,you will stink it up and the big bears will be gone like you couldnt believe

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    Find a spot on the side of mountain that gives a good view of a valley and sit there all day glassing. Eventually one will show up then you put the stalk on. You don't want to sit up on the mountain too high, just enough to get a good view of a lot of terrain.

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    Good legs and a little luck go a lone way. Hunt late run salmon streams or just sit in a nice big berry patch.When in bear country they will come to you if you wait around the right areas.
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

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    I've never been on Kodiak in the fall. However, on my spring hunt we relied heavily on a 10 x12 tarp for shelter while glassing for hours. I pre-rigged p-cord on all of the guy outs on the tarp, draped it over some willows for support, used the hiking poles on the front, and we had a comfy spot to glass when it's raining, snowing, and blowing sideways . We also brought a 3/4 or full length foam pad to sit on and stretch out while glassing. The ground is always wet, so don't forget your pad! That's a start - good luck.
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    PATIENCE, PATIENCE, PATIENCE AND a little persistence... some good luck in the back pocket, good binos around your neck, a motivated attitude (partner included) good waterproof gear, quality boots on your feet and a solid weapon system.

    Many more items in the kit bag..but with these alone you should do pretty good.
    Good luck..an awesome place and canít wait to go back.

    Best of luck to you..hope you get a big one
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    A First Aid Kit and some TP for those close encounters.

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    Good spotting scope, havalon knives, good raingear, a bomb proof tent, comfortable waders. Always pay attention to the wind as bears don't see all that well so they depend upon their nose.

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    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
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    The tarp, 550 cord and bungee cords, and one of those small folding chairs from rei or sportsman that sit on the ground and have a back rest. They take up a little more room than the foam pad and weigh a litte more but its nice having the back rest when you sit there day after day glassing.

    Bring good tent stakes and use every one of them as well as tie it off to brush or trees.

    If you go in the fall bring boots that are warm and waterproof for when you are sitting on your butt glassing. My partner brought bunny boots and I was jealous every single day of his warm feet!

    Watch the streams and pay particular attention to any small trickle of water flowing into those streams. The big bears like to stay off the main stream and sit on high ground waiting on salmon to come by in those trickles. Or so thats how it was in our area.

    Glass from before sun rise till after the sun goes down.

    Bring extra food you will be burning more calories than you think you would sitting on your butt.

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    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    realisitic expectations....thinking your gonna drop a booner on day one catching salmon .25 mile from the tent, or your gonna see a dozen bears a day blah blah...you'll be sunk before you leave.

    Fall is tough bear hunting, be ready to pass on smaller bears, since they are the most mobile in the fall you'll see alot more of them than you will big bears, they sleep alot and move very little. If your one of those folks who'll drop any kodiak bear just to say they did, you should be fine, but if your trophy hunting be ready with the patience as mentioned above.

    Waterproof everything, with no gortex, straight up rubber is the only way to go.
    a heater in the tent is a must
    books
    flashlights and batteries
    lantern
    comfy bed, your gonna be in it alot more than normal
    binos
    snacks snacks and a few snacks
    a butt pad to sit on
    COMMON SENSE
    and a good attitude to enjoy this adventure/potiental disaster of an experience!!
    Master guide license #212.....now what?!

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    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BRWNBR View Post
    Fall is tough bear hunting, be ready to pass on smaller bears, since they are the most mobile in the fall you'll see alot more of them than you will big bears, they sleep alot and move very little. If your one of those folks who'll drop any kodiak bear just to say they did, you should be fine, but if your trophy hunting be ready with the patience as mentioned above.
    Great point Jake thanks for bringing it up!

    Also plan to be in the field the maximum time allowed by Fish and Game and add a day or two on each end so you can get into camp and be setup before and after your hunt time starts/ends if you are going after a true trophy brown bear.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BRWNBR View Post
    realisitic expectations....thinking your gonna drop a booner on day one catching salmon .25 mile from the tent, or your gonna see a dozen bears a day blah blah...you'll be sunk before you leave.

    Fall is tough bear hunting, be ready to pass on smaller bears, since they are the most mobile in the fall you'll see alot more of them than you will big bears, they sleep alot and move very little. If your one of those folks who'll drop any kodiak bear just to say they did, you should be fine, but if your trophy hunting be ready with the patience as mentioned above.

    Waterproof everything, with no gortex, straight up rubber is the only way to go.
    a heater in the tent is a must
    books
    flashlights and batteries
    lantern
    comfy bed, your gonna be in it alot more than normal
    binos
    snacks snacks and a few snacks
    a butt pad to sit on
    COMMON SENSE
    and a good attitude to enjoy this adventure/potiental disaster of an experience!!
    lol, good post jake. but...a heater in the tent? lol, come on man...surely just for the clients right? just jivin ya.

    the main thing i'd reitterate on a bear hunt anywhere is that last part: ATTITUDE! a positive one will get you farther than all the gear in the world, and a negative one will deteriorate a hunt faster than anything i know of.

    unless your familiar with salmon streams and hunting them, i'd pay a little more attention to areas that i could see into...as jake mentioned, in the fall you'll see some bears in good country, but finding the big boys at the end of their year when theyre well fed and wary of humans and their presence can be a bit tricky...some being almost completely nocturnal in areas with heavy yearly hunting pressure. catching them very early and very late going to, or coming from a feeding area is your best bet, and if you stink up their fish hole you just proly wont see em at all. better to get a vantage point and STAY DILLIGENT WITH YOUR GLASS. as bear mentioned, glassing is of utmost importance... cant shoot a bear you never saw...rain, shine, snow, sleet, hail...gotta glass/hunt through all of it as miserable as that sounds (and is!)

    something that helps me capitalize more often that not is being aggresive with your stalking after spotting the bear you want. if you find a bear at a distance in country that can be navigated reasonably well, and your content that he's a shooter...THEN STALK HIM RIGHT NOW! even tralveling bears will many times do SOMETHING in the time it takes for you get to him to aid your stalk. they'll find something to rip up, feed on berries a bit, sit down like a dog, lay down for a nap...just anything that will enable you to get closer if you hustle. i figure i've got some kind of chance at any bear i spot within five or six miles that isnt traveling straight away or straight up and away...it may just be a ten to twenty percent chance, but if he's worth it, or its late in the hunt, then hanging it out there and giving it a shot may be the difference in success. i know i for one feel better about trying for something and failing than not trying at all......on the other hand, if your undecided on whether he's a shooter, and your stalk will place your scent in good hunting country, then it might be a much better tactical decision to pass...

    one more thing i think alot of people overlook: the longer your camp is in an area, the more human scent your giving the hunting area around you. if your camp has to be placed in an area that prevailing winds sweep your scent through your hunting area, then the better chance that every bear in that valley will know about it...and you can bet the bigger bears know what that presence is all about. try to put your camps in alders, or any kind of brush that might dissipate some of that scent, and if you have the option of knowing prevailing winds, then set your camp up accordingly...obviously this isnt always possible...so just realize it, and take good opportunities as they come.

    get in shape...you may not need it, but its a shame when you dont have the wind to hang it all out for a monster thats a few miles away...bears can be chased...their nature and the way they move makes them very stalkable animals, a great way to get a good bear is to first be capable of taking advantage of every stalking opportunity that presents itself...if you pass up an opportunity on your hunt for reasons you could have prevented (like being in shape) then thats one less opportunity you'll have before the end of your hunt.

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    come on there ninefoot you dont like a warm tent...lol what I do is: I have a piece of 1/4" plywood about 9" by 12" and both sides are laminated with countertop formica,then you can put it on the floor ot the tent and run your stove for a few minutes and it gets nice and toasty.An old guide buddy made mine for me. Hunters are real happy when they can get dressed in a nice warm bomb shelter...

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    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    i just set my mr buddy right on the floor, dries the floot of the tent out.
    if your tent is a four man, you can hang the lantern right near the floor then it will heat the tent. hanging a lantern high wastes all the heat.
    Master guide license #212.....now what?!

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    Member ninefoot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bear View Post
    come on there ninefoot you dont like a warm tent...lol what I do is: I have a piece of 1/4" plywood about 9" by 12" and both sides are laminated with countertop formica,then you can put it on the floor ot the tent and run your stove for a few minutes and it gets nice and toasty.An old guide buddy made mine for me. Hunters are real happy when they can get dressed in a nice warm bomb shelter...
    allright, allright, i've been known to set up the msr inside its pot for a few minutes right as i get up when its real cold....but shhhhh....dont tell anybody. the clients get a buddy heater for their bombshelter (i sleep in a two man mountain tent...i spend all day every day with em, i dont need to sleep by em too...) but honestly i'm forever worrying about em letting the **** things burn up the floor or themselves, so i'm not real fond of handing them over unless its pretty chilly out.

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    Member Bullwinkle50's Avatar
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    Zach and Jake,

    What has been your experience with early morning and late evenings for bear activity in the spring. Tony Russ mentions in his book about the fall bears and mirrors what Zach brought up about catching them in the fall just at first or last light. I just wondered what you guys have seen over the last few years on spring bear movement.

    Randy

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    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    spring, means anytime anywhere. your gaining huge amounts of daylight in the spring and daylight changes every day and they are more motivated in the spring than in the fall. I've never noticed a difference in morning and evening.
    One thing to keep in mind. alot seems to happen in the morning no matter what. mostly because you are glassing an area fresh, so there might have been a bear there for 8 hours but you see it right off the bat in the morning. you start thinking mornings a hot time. where as at dark you've been looking at it already for 8 hours or whatever, it might seem slow. magic hour for me as been about 10am...consistantly for years i've spotted more game at 10 am than any other time.
    course i wake up at 955am....
    Master guide license #212.....now what?!

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    10 AM! That's my magic hour. I told a fella one day on day one, moose seem to move around 10 AM, he was up doing pushups and running the landing strip at 4 AM each day ready to go. Day 3, 69" @ 10:15.

    Anyway my essential bear gear is the not-so-famous Gooch chair. Pick your likely spot to sit each day to glass. Dig out a bench to sit on and I take some ever present alder and whack down 6 or so 4" poles about 2 feet long. Using my gerber machete, which is amazing, I sharpen one end, sink them into the dirt - VOILA! Chair back for glassing. Yep, I get bored.
    Mike
    www.coffmancoveak.com
    Prince of Wales Island

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    You guys are funny. Not related but if I am lucky enough to hunt the brooks again then I will stay up late and sleep in. Dang sheep are all over the place at midnight and at 7 am the entire drainage was barren hillside. Kind of nice to have a reason to live like a college kid with no guilt!

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    Seems to me that in the spring once they are out of their dens and get some fresh grass in them to blow their winter plug they are always on the move any time of the day.I look at it this way, they are hungry, just spent a winter sleepin with no food so they wander more,whereas in the fall they are fattened up a bit and more picky about what and where and when they choose to eat.Plus the other thing is during a spring the amount of daylight is almost 17 hours and in the fall theres only about 10 hours of daylight...funny I used to tell moose hunters on the peninsula to expect to shoot their moose at 11 am and it seemed to always be close to that....

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