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Thread: LBT

  1. #1
    Member The Kid's Avatar
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    Default LBT

    Any of you guys ever shoot any of the lighter LBT designs? Reason I ask is that I don't really like to shoot the heavyweight bullets if I don't have to. I don't care for the added recoil, even though I can handle it if it's really needed. I bought some 250gr .430 LBT WFN from Stoner at one of the gunshows, and was thinking of using them for my all around load. I punched a 245 Lyman Keith GC end to end through a 300lb hog a couple months back, and everything you read says the LBT designs offer everything the Keith does and more. That Keith was only started at about 1150fps, so I'm really not seeing the need for much more power. Just thought I would see if anyone else has more experience before I Sally forth to punch a hole in a blackbear when the snow melts.

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    I think you will find the WFN design fully the equal to the Keith type in terminal performance and quite likely a little more accurate at long shots. Further in the 44 I think the 300 grain LFN is probably significantly more accurate at 100 or more than the lighter Keith type. Generally the wider meplat will give a greater permanent wound cavity than the Keith SWC. We might be splitting bear hairs here but I think thats the trend and the idea behind the LBT designs.
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  3. #3
    Member The Kid's Avatar
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    From the ones I've shot the LBT seems to kinda work like my 257 WBY. In that, the harder you mash the throttle, the better the accuracy gets. I have a bunch of 310 flatnose GC bullets I cast last winter, but was thinking that if the 250 LBT would do the job I would shoot them. Seems the only ones we ever hear about are the heavy for caliber ones. I'm not really into the super heavyweight stuff for my revolvers, oddly I'm always on the spy for heavy for caliber bullets for my rifles, haven't shot a 150 through my 06 in ages. I have a real fondness for the 270gr Speer FN in 44 magnum loads, but they get spendy as much as I like to shoot, plus the wife to be bought me a new RCBS lubrisizer for Christmas. So I guess I'll have to fire up the old newspaper bullet box and do some shooting. Last time I did the 270 Speer outpenetrated the 340SSK in some old CorBon factory ammo I scrounged up, repeatedly! Maybe bigger isn't always better.

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    A .44 will shoot anything from 240 to about 330 gr. The 250 gr should be just fine.
    Heavier would be better for very large animals with large bone but I don't think any would laugh at a 250.

  5. #5

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    I settled on the 280 grain LBT's years ago. My .44 is the S&W Mountain Gun which is as heavy as I am willing to carry. I am sure my gun is saying thanks, I know my shooting hand does. The 250 grain LBT should be a good bullet for Alaska.

  6. #6
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    I've tested alot of cast bullets through my 480, and the most accurate was a 310 gr LFN from a 4 cavity balisticast mold. Honestly I don't think I was able to realize the mechanical accuracy of that bullet, but over 9.3gr of unique which clocked 950 fps. My best group was 1 1/2" at 100 yds for 3 shots, strung horizontaly. 25yd groups were one ragged hole for 5 shots. I'd wanted to throttle that bullet back to 700 fps to get a plinker load at mild levels but the accuracy dropped off. I did have a custom mold made as a scaled up keith design that dropped 275 gr but I had to push it 1000 fps to get good groups.

    So no reason to think you can't back off the bullet weight and velocity and still get steller accuracy. Asside from bear and moose, I wouldn't hesitate to hunt game with my 480 pusing a 310 gr ~1000 fps. Same goes for a 44 with 250-250 at the same speed.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

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