Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: Trailer selection-- need advice.

  1. #1
    New member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    7

    Default Trailer selection-- need advice.

    I need an aluminum snowmachine trailer for two sleds... but I will also be using it to haul my Rhino side-by-side during the summer. Here's where I need experienced advise-- can I get by with an 11 or 12 foot single axle? I know a double axle 12 footer would be best but the double axle cost so much more. I like to get around the state so it will be used a lot.

    Will the single axle do the job or should I buck up and get a double?

    Curly

  2. #2
    Member IndyCzar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Just 55 miles north of ANC ... on the lake
    Posts
    351

    Default

    Hi Curly,
    I have a two place and a four place aluma trailer...(didn't really need the two place but was a package deal)...I have used the two place for my Rhino, and a smaller 4 wheeler...(Honda foreman i think)...The 2 place is light, easy to move around but a little bit short coupled...I like the four place due to the larger tires and ease of moving a heavier load, four wheelers meat wagon, 3 or 4 sleds ect...But man the 2 place is great to just load up and go...

  3. #3
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,415

    Default

    I use the heck out of my 2 place aluminum trailer because it is super easy load and haul and I got it for $750. That said I would much prefer a larger one with dual axels and larger wheels. Those few minute saved hooking up sure won't seem worth it when the little tires come apart on the road somewhere! A dual axel also gives you options to limp to a place where you can work on it. Murphy can guarantee that your left side tire will blow on the narrowest of roads with no shoulder and probably on the back side of a blind curve in a 65mph zone.

  4. #4

    Default

    There is many reasons that you would want to go with the two axles. One as LuJon stated it gives you a little more options in getting off the road. Another is with a 4 place it gives you the option of someone else going along where the cost can be split . A 4 place is not that much more to pull as a 2 place. It is a lot esaier to back than a short coupled trailer. Much better to control on a slick road.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,246

    Default

    Don't forget you have brakes on a two axle trailer.

  6. #6
    Member IndyCzar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Just 55 miles north of ANC ... on the lake
    Posts
    351

    Default

    the brakes in the winter is an EXCELLENT point!!!...along with the bigger tires/wheels...short version is I have both and if I had to only keep one it would be the 4 place dual axel...

  7. #7
    Member Dupont Spinner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Chugiak
    Posts
    1,425

    Default

    Get the double axle......and look at a 14 footer

  8. #8
    New member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    7

    Default

    Thanks for the advise gentlemen.

  9. #9
    New member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    7

    Default

    I just got off the phone with Mike over at White Spruce Trailer Sales in Anchorage. Holy Expensive! For a 14 foot double axle trailer (make- Aluma) with slush guards (ramps that fold down front), brakes (these were an option even though its a double axle), LED lights, spare tire- price $4900 The basic 14 footer was $3895. I don't recall what he said the single axle tilt was. Wow.

  10. #10
    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Wasilla, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    3,185

    Default

    Any particular reason you want/need aluminum? Talking with Gary at Greatland Welding, he said they see at least 3:1 aluminum over steel in for crack repairs. Granted you will save a little weight, but steel will be much less expensive and may present some other options. I've got an old 8x8 steel Karavan trailer that I've had since the early '90s and it is still going. It doesn't look pretty, but it is sound.
    AKmud
    http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j96/AKmud/213700RMK1-1.jpg


    The porcupine is a peacful animal yet God still thought it necessary to give him quills....

  11. #11
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,415

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AKmud View Post
    Any particular reason you want/need aluminum? Talking with Gary at Greatland Welding, he said they see at least 3:1 aluminum over steel in for crack repairs. Granted you will save a little weight, but steel will be much less expensive and may present some other options. I've got an old 8x8 steel Karavan trailer that I've had since the early '90s and it is still going. It doesn't look pretty, but it is sound.
    My next trailer will be steel and hopefully home built if I can get the welder and entice Mud with enough beer to lend some expertise. My F250 will never know the difference and a steel trailer will last much longer though probably not look as pretty in 5 years.

  12. #12
    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Wasilla, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    3,185

    Default

    Go for it LJ! If I can build one, most anyone can.
    AKmud
    http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j96/AKmud/213700RMK1-1.jpg


    The porcupine is a peacful animal yet God still thought it necessary to give him quills....

  13. #13
    Member mod elan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Glennallen
    Posts
    1,476

    Default

    If we all drove like sane people while pulling aluminum trailers on these roads they would stand a better chance of holding up for the long haul. Plus there are some shabby built aluminum trailers out there that shouldn't be sold in Alaska period.

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    282

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AQHA View Post
    I just got off the phone with Mike over at White Spruce Trailer Sales in Anchorage. Holy Expensive! For a 14 foot double axle trailer (make- Aluma) with slush guards (ramps that fold down front), brakes (these were an option even though its a double axle), LED lights, spare tire- price $4900 The basic 14 footer was $3895. I don't recall what he said the single axle tilt was. Wow.
    But you never see one on the side of the road broke down. They are excellent trailers that hold up to our driving conditions. I went from a single axle Featherlite (also a well built aluminum trailer) to a 16' Aluma with dual axles, I'll never go back to a single. They pull so much smoother and the snowmachines, ATV's, fish houses, ect don't take a beating bouncing down the road. Check on the price of a sixteen footer (less popular size, usually used for large rafts), it comes with brakes and skip the LED's they just get covered with snow and can't be seen.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •