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Thread: Red Hawk Rifles?

  1. #1

    Default Red Hawk Rifles?

    Was just wondering if anyone had any experience with one of these rifles. (not being caliber specific here)

    http://www.redhawkrifles.com/product...-alaskan-rifle

    Talked to the gunsmith (the owner I think) and seemed very knowledgable. Not to mention patient, especially for a guy with a pile of rifles to get built! Anyway, if anyone has played with one of these, I'd be interested to hear your opinions.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Member 1Cor15:19's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jamesjq View Post
    Was just wondering if anyone had any experience with one of these rifles. (not being caliber specific here)

    http://www.redhawkrifles.com/product...-alaskan-rifle
    I've no experience with this particular builder, but what he's doing doesn't look difficult--nor does it look "custom." I've used factory SS 700 rifles for many years now and some fluting and trigger tuning does not make it a custom rifle.

    For the same amount of money a guy can build a rifle with a top-shelf barrel and McMillan stock that will weigh an extra ounce or two because the action is not fluted. For my part, I'll never buy another B&C stock. Remington barrels are not "bad", but I much prefer a quality barrel maker if given the option, even more so at the same price point. Not to mention I'd get to make all the decisions in barrel contour, stock profile, etc. Some guys like turn key items, others like choices; I fall into the latter group.
    Foolishness is a moral category, not an intellectual one.

  3. #3

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    Yeah, I hear you about being able to pick and choose what you want. I'd love to be able to build one but with a 1 year old and a 2.5 year old, there is value (time and money wise) for me in something I can drag outta the box with a guarantee that it's gonna shoot. Not to mention being about as light as it can be.
    Just curious, why do dislike the Bell and Carlson stock? I've only ever held one on a Christensen and it seemed to feel right. Never shot one though.
    I have also been looking at the Kimber 8400 and the Tikka T3 in either 300 or 338 WM. But for whatever reason I've been jonesin for a .300 RUM and the other guys don't make em.

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    Member 1Cor15:19's Avatar
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    I'll take a top-shelf barrel on a 700 action bedded in a McMillan stock over any accuracy guarantee on a reworked Remington barreled action. It might take a few weeks longer to build one than buy it from RHR ready to go, but it can happen in 3-4 months, maybe sooner depending on what you really want. You can put together a 6.25-6.5 pound 700 (sans scope) without any trouble.

    B&C stocks take a lot of work to make them "right" IME and even then they are a noticeably poorer option. I've had B&C stocks that fit so poorly that the bolt will not close in the supplied cutout or that the aluminum bedding block only provided contact for 20-30% of the recoil lug. In their defense, for about the same product they're $100 cheaper than a H.S. Buying a new B&C with aluminum bedding block is going to run around $225-50 and they come in 2 or 3 styles. Buying a new McMillan is going to run around $450 with a dozen or more styles and a nearly unlimited array of colors (paint, camo, molded-in) and the construction and performance of the McMillan is simply light years ahead. It seems like it costs twice as much, but in reality it's just another $200 and the product speaks for itself.

    At $1350 you can get more for less, or a lot more for about the same price. If it seems a good deal to you, then maybe it is for you. I couldn't be talked into a RHR rifle, though I'd not be at all reluctant to assemble my own rifle from their "custom" rifles' blueprint.

    If I wanted a true lightweight, then the Montana at $300 cheaper and more than a half pound lighter than the RHR seems a no brainer. In fact, you could end up with a scoped Montana for about the same price as the RHR. I can't envision a scenario that I'd feel under-gunned with a 300 WSM and think that a 300 RUM would make any difference...YMMV.
    Foolishness is a moral category, not an intellectual one.

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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    I think one of the most gimmick terms in the rifle world today is "blueprinted action". yeah!!!

  6. #6

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    I didn't think that was a "blue printed" action......for what ever it may or may not be worth!
    Thanks for the insight 1Cor, I do like the CRF in the Montana, and actually I came across a NIB model 70 classic stainless on gun broker that kinda gets my wheels turning.......you know how it is, one of the best parts of getting a new rifle is getting to do all of the shopping for one, and one of the worst parts of getting a new rifle is having to do the shopping for one!
    Either way, whatever I end up with hopefully will be punching a hole in an elk this fall on Raspberry island!

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    Member 1Cor15:19's Avatar
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    I didn't mean to confuse the situation by saying I'd follow their "custom rifles' blueprint." I simply meant that building a rifle following the style/parameters of Remington's Ti rifle using all SS components is not a new idea nor a bad one.
    Foolishness is a moral category, not an intellectual one.

  8. #8

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    Okay, I smell what you're stepping in.

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