Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 75

Thread: Sheep Camp

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Outside, unfortunately
    Posts
    76

    Default Sheep Camp

    Just wanted to post a couple questions on my upcoming TMA sheep hunt.

    I am looking at purchasing some Irish Setter Mountain Claw boots and would like to know if anyone has used these?

    Addititonally, trying to decide between an MSR Whisperlte Stove or a Jet boil stove. They are equally priced just curious with personal experiences with both, especially at elevation. I have heard that the jet boil canisters last longer then the white gas MSR canisters.

    Also, what are you opinions on the stretchy game bags you can buy at Fred Meyers for sheep meat?

    I cannot afford the Lowa's sheep boots, though I hear they are the best. This will probably be my last sheep hunt would love to have a matching ram for my other one, bookends

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    big lake ak
    Posts
    342

    Default

    i don know about the jet boil but i have a whisper lite that works well and several propane mods. i take an apex multi fuel if i am going to climb or it is to cold. the apex will push anything that is pretty much a liquid. i have a set of irish setter rubber knee highs that i bought 2 years back and have used them on knight and perry climbing that slimy slope and the tread was great.

  3. #3
    Premium Member denalihunter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    67 mi E of Cantwell, 68 mi W of Paxson
    Posts
    1,555

    Default

    I used the Jetboil and it worked great at 6000 feet. I also has the Lowa's and I feel they are the best. Lightweight, supportive and comfortable. THink they were around $125 or so. Not too bad as far as boots go nowadays.
    Experience Real Alaska! www.alpinecreeklodge.com

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    2,919

    Default

    on the boot ,when considering options I think one of the biggest things that never get adressed much it the tread/tread design and boot edges in paticular. I personally wear plastics and my boots only usually last several hunts due to the rounding of the edges. There are times in that wet hard packed shale that you have to kick in so to speak to get a foot hold to cross and other times when you are using the edge on the toe to climb, boots with out edges dont get a good grip and tend to roll out. And you also need to have the proper support to be able to stand on that edge(leaning into the mountain will usually make you slip)

    I have used the strechy game bage before you just want to make sure they are not the cheese cloth type

  5. #5
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,415

    Default

    Good points bear. For me a full shank is also key for the very same reason. It adds tortional rigidity that helps prevent roll when you can only kick in enough of a ledge for one side of the boot. My soon to be retired kennetreks did ok if the outside 1/2 of the boot was on the ledge but would roll if the ledge was under the inside 1/2. Next set of boots I will make sure that this problem is eliminated.

  6. #6
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
    Posts
    9,748

    Default

    I just googled the Irish Setter boot's you mention. I wouldn't go with that type of boot in the rocks. IMO, you want a boot with exceptional ankle support. Meaning having something quite rigid around your ankle where your whole leg would have to roll, before your ankle would. This is why many use hard plastic boots as well. They may be a bit harder on the knees but they will save your ankles. If this may be your last sheep hunt, you want to make it as comfortable as you can don't you? I know you said you can't afford much, but try and put out as much as you can for a good mountain boot, that will provide REAL GOOD ankle support to make sidehilling a WHOLE lot easier. Even though you may not hunt sheep again, you'll still have them and can use them on other types of hunts. I used mine to hunt moose and caribou as well.

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Outside, unfortunately
    Posts
    76

    Default

    Thanks for the replies. I priced the Lowa Sheep Hunter boots and they are over $400. I used Rocky matterhorns on my last sheep hunt 15 years ago and they held up fairly well but I no longer have them. I will look for boots with better ankle support and will be using trekking poles as well. The stove is probably great either way i go. Just thought it would easier to carry the propane canisters for the jet boil instead of pouring white gas for the MSR. The Irish Setter Mountain Claws http://www.endless.com/s/ref=topnav_...26pageCode%3Dd appears to have a great tread pattern and they don't require a long break-in period.

    Thanks for your tips.

  8. #8
    Member bnkwnto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Eagle River Alaska, United States,
    Posts
    540

    Default

    My first sheep hunt I used regular leather danner boots and I busted out the seams. I had wet, hurting feet for the whole trip. For my next boots I bought cabelas meindl boots and they have held up for several seasons. Last year I switched to kenetrecs because I got a good deal on camofire.com and they worked awesome. Good luck on your hunt. I had the TMA tag last year and it was an awesome hunt.

    Whatever boot you decide on make sure they are well broken in ahead of time.

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    2,919

    Default

    these are my boots after a sheep and goat hunt....note all the cuts from shale and rocks

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    2,919

    Default

    and one more,edges are gone

  11. #11
    Sponsor Duckhunter01's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Anchorage, Trapper Creek, Seward
    Posts
    1,799

    Default

    JetBoil,,hands down, but again it is personnel preference, Kenetrek 400 boots or meindl boots.

    My 2 cents.

    If these are your only real questions pertaining to the TMA hunt.. sounds like you are good to go..good luck and congrats on the tag. looking forward to drawing that tag one day myself.

    Sportsmans has the Kenetrek boots..at least go by there and try them on. Size runs true, and they will stretch a little as most do when broken in. They are extremely comfortable and after applying the oil that comes with them.. we hit the trails, the breaking in process was little if any on them right out of the box.
    President of Alaska Waterfowl Assoc.
    http://akwaterfowl.com
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Alask...78020265619952
    AlaskaWaterfowlAssociation@gmail.com
    Gen.1:26
    And God said, let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.

  12. #12
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
    Posts
    9,748

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bnkwnto View Post
    My first sheep hunt I used regular leather danner boots and I busted out the seams. I had wet, hurting feet for the whole trip. For my next boots I bought cabelas meindl boots and they have held up for several seasons. Last year I switched to kenetrecs because I got a good deal on camofire.com and they worked awesome. Good luck on your hunt. I had the TMA tag last year and it was an awesome hunt.

    Whatever boot you decide on make sure they are well broken in ahead of time.
    I had a pair of regular boots like the Danners that I darn near completely blew off my feet on a sheep hunt. Packing out a ram and all my gear, by the time I was back at the lake is was like I was walking in moccasins. My feet hurt for weeks after.

  13. #13
    Member duckslayer56's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Maryland...not by choice
    Posts
    2,058

    Default

    Quality boots are priority number one for my sheep hunt.

    Jet boil works great, I have used one for years. I am going to try out the MSR Reactor this year though. I like the wind shield idea, and that I can remove the pot from the burner.

    What every you decide, congrats on the tag, I hope you get a big one!
    Some people call it sky busting... I call it optimism
    "Swans are a gift" -DucksandDogs
    I am a shoveler's worst nightmare!

  14. #14

    Default

    For quality boots for a bit less, sign up for the deal flyer on Sierratradingpost.com and look over some of their mountaineering boots. You can get some good ones (if they fit your feet) for nearly half what the Lowa Sheephunters price out at.

  15. #15
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,415

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska_Lanche View Post
    For quality boots for a bit less, sign up for the deal flyer on Sierratradingpost.com and look over some of their mountaineering boots. You can get some good ones (if they fit your feet) for nearly half what the Lowa Sheephunters price out at.
    Good call, I got my wife's la sportiva boots for around $150 if I recall correctly. I had a set of setters and they were pretty beat up after just a season of regular moose hunting.

  16. #16
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Talkeetna
    Posts
    5,714

    Default

    You can't afford NOT to have good boots. It's a long way to sheep season and even in today's economy it's possible for an adult to easily save up $400 for a pair of boots in a few months.

    After seeing a pair of Irish Setters come back from a sheep hunt with the soles held on with only paracord and duct tape I wrote them off my list of any boots I would ever buy.

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    2,919

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AKDoug View Post
    You can't afford NOT to have good boots. It's a long way to sheep season and even in today's economy it's possible for an adult to easily save up $400 for a pair of boots in a few months.

    After seeing a pair of Irish Setters come back from a sheep hunt with the soles held on with only paracord and duct tape I wrote them off my list of any boots I would ever buy.

    just to reiterate this point^^^^ I have had a hunter that had to quit a 15000$ hunt due to bad boots and what they did to his feet...

    so bring good boots and take care of your feet,remember in sheep country as soon as you get that little tingle of a hotspot on your foot STOP and take care of it with mole skin or ducttape or whatever, if it becomes a blister you WILL REGRET it I gaurantee it!!!!!

  18. #18
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks Area
    Posts
    7,272

    Default

    The only thing that has ever made me give up a hunt was bad boots. Looks around and try to find some Lowas or other mountain boot, try ebay and CL.

    Steve
    "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"
    Founding Member
    http://www.residenthuntersofalaska.org/

  19. #19
    Member duckslayer56's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Maryland...not by choice
    Posts
    2,058

    Default

    I saw a new set of Koflach Degree boots on CL for $200. That is a screamin deal I spent $370 for mine at Barneys. I would jump on those while they are there.
    Some people call it sky busting... I call it optimism
    "Swans are a gift" -DucksandDogs
    I am a shoveler's worst nightmare!

  20. #20
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    712

    Default

    Rethink your boots - those irish setters look like high top tennis shoes. You want minimal seams - the shale and rock will carve away at all those seams and tear your boots up.

    You need two things - sole stiffness and ankle support. Check sole stiffness by giving the heel and toe of a candidate boot a twist. If it's noodly (like the Kenetrek), you want something different. Looking at those irish setters - they look like you could twist them 180 with your hands. Your feet won't like that a bit when you spend a day dancing on boulders and sloped ground. A stiff sole protects your foot every bit as much as stiff ankle support.

Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •