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Thread: Cabin Flooring Advice?

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    Default Cabin Flooring Advice?

    Looking for some advice on flooring in a cabin. What do you guys recommend for a flooring material over the sub floor in a cabin, Talkeetna area, wood heat, used in summer and winter off and on, not too expensive? Laminate flooring? Vinyl? Carpet? Need ideas as I am no carpenter but have friends that are. Thanks for you help.

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    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
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    Tile around the stove, the kitchen area, then carpet the rest of the cabin. Really depends on what kinda setup you have. and do you have a vaccum cleaner at hand?

    Some go all tile, but I hate to get up in the morning when the fire is out and walk on a cold floor, lol.

    The reason I say tiles, is that you can change them out if they curl.

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    The new vinyl plank products are going to put laminate in its coffin; they're easier to install, clean, repair, less slippery, and cheaper. The "Allure" stuff from Home Depot starts around a buck a foot, I believe.
    "Ė the stars, the snow, and the fire. These are the books he reads most of all." ~John Haines

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    A buddy of mine installed industrial rubber flooring in his recently built cabin, it has a "diamond plate" look to it and is gray (maybe available in other colors?). It is very easy to clean with a vacuum and a mop and has held up nicely. his cabin is in the Petersville area and gets used year-round. He it so as not worry over removing boots/shoes etc all the time.
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    We went with an industrial floor paint over the plywood subfloor. Looks good in the cabin and has held up well for the past 5 years. Weekend cabin in Petersville area. The key to durability is to get a good quality paint that's made for floors.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cdubbin View Post
    The new vinyl plank products are going to put laminate in its coffin; they're easier to install, clean, repair, less slippery, and cheaper. The "Allure" stuff from Home Depot starts around a buck a foot, I believe.
    you hit that nail on the head.....they are putting a dent in it already. easier to install,less messy to install,less waste most of the time,lots of advantages....its a floating floor so would probably work good in a cabin as long as you allow for expansion and contraction

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    I guess I must be the odd man out. Because if it were me I'd go with vinyl around the doorway/entry, and in the kitchen. But I'd go with a nice chunk of Berber carpet or something durable in the living area. But's that's just me as I like to walk on warm carpet in a cold cabin.

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    Be cautious about installing vinyl in an entry way.
    In the winter it is extremely slick, especially when you first enter the place as the vinyl is cold and you probably have snowy boots on. A slippery situation to the say the least.
    I like the KISS method, use a quality paint and paint the floor. Fast, easy, practical, etc....
    BK

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    Member hogfamily's Avatar
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    I put Allure in our bathroom in our Willow cabin end of last summer. Installs easy, make sure you keep sharp blades in your razor box cutter. Not much of a learning curve to install. Make sure you keep dirt etc. off the glue strips.

    So far it has survived Minus 45 F warming up to +70. Some of the seams come up a little when itís cold, step on them and they reseal when warm. (The instructions say that you should not install if temps go much below freezing).

    The seams were tight when installed but they contract and have a small gap when cold they re-expand and re-fill the gaps when it warms up.

    I donít think I would use in a very large area due to the seam gaps when cold.

    Even though it says that you can place on uneven floor I would make sure floor is as level as possible to avoid breaking when itís really cold. I experimented with a scrap piece and it snapped in half when about minus 20.

    So far it has held up well to the moisture and water on the floor around the tub / shower.

    In the kitchen / dining area we have a higher quality sheet vinyl that was initially installed in the cabin and it has held up well, (cabin is about 15 years old, and we have had it for nine years). We have the original commercial grade carpet in the living room area that has also held up great. The upstairs bed rooms are painted T&G, some kind of deck paint I think. Same paint in the utility room over OSB both has had no issues. We have four very active boys, a dog, and a lot of guest / kids through out the year and all the floors have done well with not much wear.

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    Getting away from carpet. We have 8 rental cabins near Fairbanks. The carpet just gets trashed. We are switching to 12"x12" vinyl composition tile. It's 99 cents at Lowes for seconds. About the same to install by a pro, plus adhesive prep and sealer(relatively expensive but worth it). The tenants provide their own area rugs (as do I) and take them with when they go. We have one outside that's been in for 25 years and is as good as new.

  11. #11

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    We installed the original version (Pergo) of laminate flooring when we first build our place some 15 years ago and it still looks good. We do have tile under the stove (on top of a cement backer board base) and that is highly recommended. We are toying with the idea of re-doing the floor and I agree that the vinyl plank flooring looks good. One of the advantages is that is should go down right over the laminate flooring so should be about a one day job. We are even thinking about using an electric in-floor heating system under the laminate or vinyl.

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    Thanks for all the input. I'm liking the KISS method some have mentioned. Paint the subfloor with high quality floor paint then use area rugs where desired. Seems low maintenance and low budget. Keep em comin'.

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    Quote Originally Posted by akjam View Post
    We installed the original version (Pergo) of laminate flooring when we first build our place some 15 years ago and it still looks good. We do have tile under the stove (on top of a cement backer board base) and that is highly recommended. We are toying with the idea of re-doing the floor and I agree that the vinyl plank flooring looks good. One of the advantages is that is should go down right over the laminate flooring so should be about a one day job. We are even thinking about using an electric in-floor heating system under the laminate or vinyl.
    Get rid of that laminate; you ever have a leak and get water under it, you'll understand. With the vinyl, won't matter a bit.
    "Ė the stars, the snow, and the fire. These are the books he reads most of all." ~John Haines

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by akpackfan View Post
    looking for some advice on flooring in a cabin. What do you guys recommend for a flooring material over the sub floor in a cabin, talkeetna area, wood heat, used in summer and winter off and on, not too expensive? Laminate flooring? Vinyl? Carpet? Need ideas as i am no carpenter but have friends that are. Thanks for you help.
    we used 2x12's on 16 inch centers with 1-1/8 ply tongue & groove & lots of glue, (i hate squeaky floors) covered kitchen area with (swiftlock) laminate and living room area with berber carpet. No problems in 5 years. P1000242.jpg

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    Member greythorn3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cabinfields View Post
    we used 2x12's on 16 inch centers with 1-1/8 ply tongue & groove & lots of glue, (i hate squeaky floors) covered kitchen area with (swiftlock) laminate and living room area with berber carpet. No problems in 5 years. P1000242.jpg

    woah im suprized that place didnt burn down, whats the r value u need under that woodstove? clearances people clearances, may save a life even your own.
    Semper Fi!

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    X2 on what hogfamily said about allure it is great for small areas & low traffic. Have it in a bathroom works good cleans easy no moisture problems. In the kitchen island area the surface not very abrasive resistant, scratches easy from chair slides, puppy sliding etc.

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    It just depends how nice of a look you want. We used a laminate floor that looks like wood that comes like wood floor in the box, but instead on snapping together it adhesives together, you cut it with a utility knife and don't need a saw.. they have in at home depot $1.50 square foot but you can do a cabin in half a day with a tape measure and a utility knife....

    We put out rugs in the nice part of summer or winter and roll them up in fall and spring with the dog running around with muddy feet.

    but I almost did carpet squares on half but didn't.

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    I think you should use rubber rug in your office,as per your image of office you can place a good quality rubber rug it will suit your office,and will be good for long time.

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    I have seen your office image as per my point of view rubber rug is a perfect solution for your office.Because it is suitable for your office,and it is durable for long period.
    Quote Originally Posted by chrstina paul View Post
    It's true that we don't know what we've got until we lose it, but it's also true that we don't know what we've been missing until it arrives.
    -area rug

  20. #20

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    ACTUALLY, THE ALUMINUM PLATE & HEIGHT OF THE STOVE IS PERFECT FROM STARTING ANY FIRE. THE INSIDE BOTTOM 1/3 OF THE STOVE IS LINED WITH GRATING & SAND. BEEN USING IT FOR 5 YEARS NOW AND NARY A PROBLEM. AT EASE SOLDIER!

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