Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 26

Thread: New TVs in cold cabin.

  1. #1
    Member hogfamily's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Anchorage Suburbanites, part time Willowbillies, Appleseeds, and Weekend Warrior Turquoise Miners!
    Posts
    1,094

    Default New TVs in cold cabin.

    Has anyone had any experience with the new flat screen TVs in their cabins?

    We have a TV that is about 15-20 years old in our cabin that we watch on movie night.

    We do not heat the cabin when we are not there and it gets down to minus 45 F. The TV, (DVD and video player), works great when warmed up.

    Was thinking that when the older TV gives up the ghost will the new TVs survive the temperature extremes?

  2. #2

    Default

    Never used one in the cold you guys get. But it has never not worked down below freezing in the truck, the LCD in my trucks radio always has worked even at -15. Only thing I have read is warm up the tv before use but they are shipped all over the world in temps much colder than I have been in. So with that in mind I would think you wouldn't get damage from the cold while it sits, Maybe warm up the cabin before using.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Homer and Kenai River
    Posts
    24

    Default

    Google "LCD tv's cold temperatures". Pages and pages, much contradictory info and advice of course. Main themes I got were 1) operating temps are more the concern than storage temps (they must be warmed up to room temps before plugging them in), and 2) lowest approved storage temps vary by manufacturer but seem not to be lower than minus 20F. One recommendation was to buy a used tube set for next to nothing and no worries. An old cathode tv might fit the cabin experience more than a flat screen, kind of like the 30's wood cabinet tube radio I use at my cabin. But then I am a geezer who likes old time radio. And I am watching a 55" HD Samsung as I write. That said I still like the 9" cathode vcr combo in my camper.

  4. #4
    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Deltajct
    Posts
    2,499

    Default

    I would make a T.V. case ( pillow case) kinda thing to cover it when you leave , then uncover it when the cabin got to +45 or more just to be on the safe side, its just me but with the price of flat screens these days!!!!!!!!!!, lol

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    950

    Default

    That will keep the dust out but won't do anything for keeping the TV warm when there is no power to it. I bet it can survive pretty cold temps as long as you don't touch it until it warms back up.

  6. #6
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
    Posts
    9,748

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rock_skipper View Post
    I would make a T.V. case ( pillow case) kinda thing to cover it when you leave , then uncover it when the cabin got to +45 or more just to be on the safe side, its just me but with the price of flat screens these days!!!!!!!!!!, lol
    I think I would put a big garbage bag around it while the cabin, and it was warming up. This would at least keep moisture from condensing on the tv as the cabin warmed up.

  7. #7
    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer, AK.
    Posts
    4,116

    Default

    Our flatscreen works fine for the last two years at the cabin. Temps as low as -42* recorded out there.
    We cover it when gone to keep dust off as mentioned. Also let it warm up to room temps before turning it on.
    Otherwise, no issues or special treatment.
    BK

  8. #8
    Member Gerberman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Soldotna AK, Eugene, OR
    Posts
    612

    Default

    I just leave the TV uncovered it gets to -35 in the cabin, I just warm the cabin and turn on the TV. seems to work just fine. I think if you have power all the time, and the TV is plugged in there is a small amount of heat from the transformers, by covering it with insulated material it will help to keep it a little warmer.

  9. #9

    Default

    We have not had a problem with our flatscreen after about 3 winters. We turn off the power at the power bar so it doesn't even get a little heat. Generally we start up the stove and maybe turn on the TV when the temps get above freezing inside but my guess is that the TV itself is still well below that.

  10. #10
    Member greythorn3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Chasin the ladys! away!
    Posts
    2,507

    Default

    u gotta be careful because it will condensate when turned on if not allowed to warm to room temperature slowly. and condensation isnt good for all them buttons switches and circuit boards in tv. i know this because i had an issue with my samsung because of this same thing, its a flatpanel too.
    Semper Fi!

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Outta Big Lake
    Posts
    1,633

    Default

    the old cheap things worked better. for example, I just got my first cell phone last summer, and I got a cheap plastic flip phone, I have run it over with a car, hit it with the chain saw (it saved my leg once when I was bucking logs and the saw bounced back and hit my leg, cutting my pants and hitting my cell phone) I dropped it in a creek, puddles, worked with it all day in snow/rain everything, and in galena my pants were soaked cause the snow was up to our chests, and I couldn't receive texts (not really a problem, but since my phone was the only one that worked out there...you know how it is) or make calls til after a couple days I took it apart and laid everything out to dry one night, and put it back together in the morning, the stuff still didn't work, but about 3:30 that after noon my phone started buzzing with all the texts I hadn't got while it wasn't working and such things. pretty crazy, worked fine ever since. dad had an old one like that till the speaker wouldn't work anymore, my sister and brother have those fancy phones and they keep breaking cause you drop it or what ever and the break. useless.... ...it seems the big old things like that are all the same, last for ever and the now fangled cool stuff just breaks
    Eccleasties 8:11 Because the sentence against an evil deed is not executed quickly, There for the hearts of the sons of men among them are given fully to do evil.

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    106

    Default

    I have a new 32" LED TV in my rec cabin in the interior mountains and the temps fall to -45 routinely. No problems since Sept. installation. I just warm up cabin/tv before use.

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,293

    Default

    I added a Vizio LCD flat screen a few years ago and was unsure of what cold would do to it. So far? Cold doesn't affect it in the least. It turns on and looks great in sub-zero temps. The cumulative warm/cold cycles haven't bothered it, either. I can't comment on plasma screens but after my LCD experience a few friends bought them and have had the same feedback as me. I run it off of small point-of-use inverter and it's been a great addition for late night/lights off entertainment.

  14. #14
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
    Posts
    9,748

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Pid View Post
    It turns on and looks great in sub-zero temps.
    You watch tv outside??......lol

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,293

    Default

    Nope. Like most weekend cabins the inside temp is equal to the outside temp when we arrive.

  16. #16
    Member Grayling Slayer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Fairbanks, AK
    Posts
    728

    Default

    I have had no problems with my LCD. I know that it has been through at least -45 and it works fine. Got a cheap wall mount to save room.
    "I'd rather be fishing!"

  17. #17
    Member hogfamily's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Anchorage Suburbanites, part time Willowbillies, Appleseeds, and Weekend Warrior Turquoise Miners!
    Posts
    1,094

    Default

    Thank you all for the TV info!

  18. #18
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
    Posts
    9,748

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hogfamily View Post
    Thank you all for the TV info!
    Did you get one yet...???

  19. #19
    Member hogfamily's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Anchorage Suburbanites, part time Willowbillies, Appleseeds, and Weekend Warrior Turquoise Miners!
    Posts
    1,094

    Default

    No not yet. Our current TV works well now. I was just wondering for when it gives up. It's about 15 - 20 years old.

  20. #20
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
    Posts
    9,748

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hogfamily View Post
    No not yet. Our current TV works well now. I was just wondering for when it gives up. It's about 15 - 20 years old.
    Oh them old ones will last forever. The new "disposable" old style tvs these days.....well you're lucky if the picture tube outlasts the warranty

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •