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Thread: Moral of the story: Always look twice in gun shops.

  1. #1
    Member highestview's Avatar
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    Default Moral of the story: Always look twice in gun shops.

    I was in the Ammo Can two days ago, picking up a 1911-22 that I had ordered. I had recently died and refinished a single shot .22 my father in law had left to me. You can see pictures of it in the hunting forum ('My artistic side on display'). I'd been thinking since then, a 22 with a magazine would be nice. Maybe another project gun to keep myself from going insane with spring fever. So I wandered over to the used gun rack. Remember, some guns look like typical, beater 22's from certain angles but you have to keep in mind; some beater 22's were made in Brazil, and have Brazilian hardwood stocks and have to be held up to the light to be fully appreciated...like this one:

    HPIM3056.jpg

    Is that not the most beautiful $75 gun you have ever seen? I couldn't believe it when I took a closer look at it. No time to call the wife and ask. I would kick myself forever if I had passed this one up. The finish has some dings and age on it, so this becomes my new eye-candy project.

    So the moral of the story: Always look twice at in gun shops.

    Doing my best to keep 4-wall madness at bay. 2 more months till the snow melts.
    Born in Alaska: The boundary lines have fallen for me in pleasant places; surely I have a delightful inheritance. Psalm 16:6

  2. #2

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    That has very nice grain, will look great restored.

  3. #3
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    I had recently died
    I am glad you came back to life and bought that beauty.

    Staining and finishing a nice piece of wood is very good for your soul.
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

  4. #4
    Member markopolo50's Avatar
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    Now that is some really nice wood, and please show "after" pictures. That looks as good as some fancy Weatherby stocks. BTW, which 1911 22 did you get? Had a couple guys looking at the GSG's. ATI imports, German Sports Guns. They look well made. Just curious, thanks

  5. #5

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    Ya just can't beat a good looking piece of wood on a rifle and that is better then good looking.

  6. #6
    Member highestview's Avatar
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    I'll be sure to post 'after' pictures. You cant see it from that picture, but there were a lot of dings in it. I used a razor to strip the bulk of the old varnish, then sanded with 180, then spent a painstaking hour using a razor point to scrape out every little ding. Now boiling water should get in and expand those nicks. Then I can really fine sand it. I'm debating between tung oil and linseed. Any opinions?

    BTW, it was a Chiappa 1911-22 and I like it very much so far. Very accurate.
    Born in Alaska: The boundary lines have fallen for me in pleasant places; surely I have a delightful inheritance. Psalm 16:6

  7. #7

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    The stock with that grain is alone worth more than you spent on the rifle
    A GUN WRITER NEEDS:
    THE MIND OF A SCHOLAR
    THE HEART OF A CHILD
    THE HIDE OF A RHINOCEROS

  8. #8
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    I have used both. My personal preference is Tru-Oil.

    Quote Originally Posted by highestview View Post
    I'll be sure to post 'after' pictures. You cant see it from that picture, but there were a lot of dings in it. I used a razor to strip the bulk of the old varnish, then sanded with 180, then spent a painstaking hour using a razor point to scrape out every little ding. Now boiling water should get in and expand those nicks. Then I can really fine sand it. I'm debating between tung oil and linseed. Any opinions?

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