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Thread: planning a trip

  1. #1
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    Default planning a trip

    Hello from the garden state!I would like to start planning a bow hunting trip{trad equipment,longbow}and need some info on where to start the ball rolling.Any help would be great,thanks in advance!

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    Quote Originally Posted by camp comfort View Post
    Hello from the garden state!I would like to start planning a bow hunting trip{trad equipment,longbow}and need some info on where to start the ball rolling.Any help would be great,thanks in advance!
    Ok so you will be asked a lot of questions so I figured Ill start for you...What is your budget(it will dictate road hunt vs flyout), what species are you looking to hunt,Do you have a bow hunter education card(some hunts require it) There are a lot of options here for the first time hunter..guided or unguided,do you have any hunting gear suitable for Alaska....
    Dave

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    I don't want to skimp out om my trip but funds are not unlimited.I can spend two to three weeks not including travel time.When Istarted bowhunting here they did;nt give out cards, but I'll get what I need .Guided might be best the first time around but open for suggestions.As far as game,would like to combine two or three,bear ,moose,boo it's the trip for me not just the quarry a kill would be great though!!Hunting with a longbow might limit my options as far as witch outfitter to use ?Gear-light to heavt outer wear mixed collection of boots,hip waders,bug net ,do need a good backpack.well thats a start. thanks

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    Any state's archery card is valid in Alaska, so you can cover that in your home state or neighboring state. Combination trips are EXPENSIVE.... and you can do moose and caribou without a guide. If you really want a bear, I'd probably start there. Get your feet wet with a guide and see what you are getting into.

    If I was looking for a bowhunting guide for grizzly I would go one of two places... Jake (BRNWBR here on the forum) at http://www.blackriverhunting.com/ or http://www.huntalaskawithus.com/

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    Ok so like AkDoug said combo hunts can be VERY expensive. A single species guided hunt is a good first way to go.As a non resident you are required by law to have a guide for brown/grizzly bear, Dall sheep and mountain goat , unless you fall under the 2nd degree kindred rule. With that said on average one of those three hunts will cost 10K to over 20k. there are some guides out there that offer other less expensive hunts on other species as well. If you are interested in a DIY hunt you could contact Michael Strahan (the site owner) as he does hunt planning and consultations for a fee I believe and he has a wealth of Alaska knowledge. There are also many books out there and I believe there are a bunch available on this site as well.Another option would be to simply do your home work and go through the archives on the sight and plan your own hunt,a lot of members on here are willing to answer all sorts of questions but dont expect them to give up their secret spots...;-).
    There are so many possibilities up here you just need to do homework. You could hunt the haul road for caribou, hunt south central for black bear, flyout for moose,south east for black bear and deer, just many options. I also suggest reading the hunting regs as there a lot of info in there as well.A lot of members are also traditional shooters/hunters so if you have questions on that I am sure they can be answered as well. I hope this helps you out a little
    Dave

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    If going for moose, go after Sept. 10 in most areas,
    Do a float if you can afford it....bring a buddy, but one tag will do unless you really know what you're doing.
    Ideally get an any bull tag as it will more than double your odds of getting to loose a shaft.
    Research calling moose, it's fun, and makes bow range much much easier.
    If you already bowhunt, you will find the classes a snap, but will still learn plenty you may have forgot.
    Streamline your hunting gear, no fancy bells or whistles on your bow that can get busted on the trip.
    Take care of your fletching.....it rains a lot up here. I went to vanes after some rough experiences.
    Heavy up your arrow a bit, get all trained up with legitimate poundage (and I prefer non mechanical heads).
    Research how to cut one up (not rocket science and there are lots of good resources out there)
    Once on the river, take your time, once your in a good area, call a lot, it can take time for them to show up.
    Research how to assess 50" or the browtime scenario for your area.
    Bring a fishing rod if you can.
    Have fires, enjoy yourself, moose are not that sneaky in most float areas.
    Making noise during the rut is helpful, they think you are a moose too.
    You don't have to go far from camp in the right area, (half the last six bulls our group got were within 300 yards of camp)
    (I'm the idiot who packs them 400-900 yards off the water....doh!)
    Look at the recent threads started by DonV....lots of good input there.

    I've got a few buddies that have done this consistently with traditional on nice bulls, enjoy. (mine was with a compound but at 15 yards a sharp stick would have done just fine).

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