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Thread: Long-duration camping - Food?

  1. #21
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    just rememder also to keep your feet dry also

  2. #22
    Member akgun&ammo's Avatar
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    Sorry, I thought just about everybody knew about s___ , shower, and shave.....

    I talked to a "guide" who does river rafting there every summer, he said they drop-off and pick-up people who do hikes...

    I left his phone # at the shop, I will try and pick it up tomorrow and post...

    That may offer a solution....

    Chris

  3. #23

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    Does anyone have any thoughts on cooking gear for this?

    A lot of people use this Jetboil thing but I don't know if this would be enough alone...

  4. #24
    Member .338WM's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Newky View Post
    Does anyone have any thoughts on cooking gear for this?

    A lot of people use this Jetboil thing but I don't know if this would be enough alone...
    I am not a fan of butane stoves, you have canisters to haul whether they are empty or full and there are fewer BTU in butane vs. white gas. My personal favorites are a Swiss Army stove or a Coleman 552, both very efficient and reliable. A full stove and a pint of full goes a long ways. To make them even more efficient a piece of aluminum foil as a sleeve or wind break is very handy.
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  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by .338WM View Post
    I am not a fan of butane stoves, you have canisters to haul whether they are empty or full and there are fewer BTU in butane vs. white gas. My personal favorites are a Swiss Army stove or a Coleman 552, both very efficient and reliable. A full stove and a pint of full goes a long ways. To make them even more efficient a piece of aluminum foil as a sleeve or wind break is very handy.
    Thanks. How much cookware do you use? Trying to be as lightweight as possible I'd like to stick with one pot to cook on, and one plate to eat on, but maybe a pan as well for other types of cooking.

  6. #26
    Member .338WM's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Newky View Post
    Thanks. How much cookware do you use? Trying to be as lightweight as possible I'd like to stick with one pot to cook on, and one plate to eat on, but maybe a pan as well for other types of cooking.
    If I am solo I use one pot for everything and eat straight from it, otherwise I carry a plastic bowl, I also use a plastic Spork for my one utensil, any and all food I cook is a one meal deal. Then I have a cup for coffeee, tea, etc.
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  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Newky View Post
    Thanks. How much cookware do you use? Trying to be as lightweight as possible I'd like to stick with one pot to cook on, and one plate to eat on, but maybe a pan as well for other types of cooking.
    One-quart stainless pot to cook and eat out of, and an insulated mug-Aladdin's are good. Light and tough and cheap-all you'll ever need. Maybe some foil to cook fish and birds in.
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    Member chico99645's Avatar
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    Trail Mix goes a long ways. Easy to pack, High in calories and Nutrition. 1 cup is 700 calories. No need to cook it and it will keep with ease. Not saying to only live on that for a month, but I would bring some along.

  9. #29
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    You can also, go to army navy stores and purchase MRES, not only do you get 1500 cal per bag, it comes with wet-nap and tolit pape. Now onthe MRE first thing is you open and strip it of all the junk you dont want or dont need, or wont use. You can carry alot if you strip down the meal bags, also others in the thread are right, even with the best meals out there you are not going to carry a months worth of food on your back, enless you plan on a pack animal.

    Why you ask, 30 days in the field requires alot of other things. Exsample 1 change of cloth, raingear, insulating layers for temp changes, change of socks, and hygene gear to main tain your health, you get sick out there your screwed, along with survival gear a good knife, small hatchet, small pack pack fishig pole, map compass and a gps, emegancy locator, fire starting tools and signaling device and bear spray or pistol your choice. Some of the stuff is opional, but things to help you survive is a must incase the worst happens, and anyone who says not toprepare for the worst is just foolish. The advise to do sort to mid lenght hike is spot on. Other than that have a hoot. And as we say in the army Ruck -UP move out

  10. #30
    Member TWB's Avatar
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    I'd start thinking outside the box for foods. Not every meal has to be a Mtn House, nor do you hafta roll out in 4th of July BBQ fashion either.

    Any of the Lipton-style noodle/rice/pasta sides are great, throw in some prepackaged chicken or tuna and you've covered several meal ideas.

    The shells n Alfredo sauce are the bomb with tuna- instant casserole.

    The dry Idaho spuds are the bomb!! I like the spiced-up ones and you can cook right out of the bag and add chicken to it.

    My problem is I don't know how to ration. I could easily kill a bag of funsize snickers or bed jerky in 3 hours of floating.

    Rafting forums are a great place for lightweight meal ideas.
    We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it. We get it rough enough at home; in towns and cities; in shops, offices, stores, banks anywhere that we may be placed

  11. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by TWB View Post
    I'd start thinking outside the box for foods. Not every meal has to be a Mtn House, nor do you hafta roll out in 4th of July BBQ fashion either.

    Any of the Lipton-style noodle/rice/pasta sides are great, throw in some prepackaged chicken or tuna and you've covered several meal ideas.

    The shells n Alfredo sauce are the bomb with tuna- instant casserole.

    The dry Idaho spuds are the bomb!! I like the spiced-up ones and you can cook right out of the bag and add chicken to it.

    My problem is I don't know how to ration. I could easily kill a bag of funsize snickers or bed jerky in 3 hours of floating.

    Rafting forums are a great place for lightweight meal ideas.
    Thanks. Ditto on rationing. I find it difficult to measure just how much food I will want/need to eat. Measuring in calories seems the best way to organise. Generally I tend to put 20% more than I think I need. Better too much than too little!

  12. #32
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    Newky
    Iam like you
    I would like to pack out 2 days of food then be 2 days away from my food

  13. #33

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    One thing still alludes me here guys, and that is mostly the "how" and "where" questions.

    As far as I'm aware there are little to no amenities in denali N park, so all food for the 30 day duration must be purchased beforehand. The how - would it be best to buy online/via phone a bulk order of food to be delivered to the park? If so, who would be able to do this? OR would it be best to buy the entire food requirements whilst I am in Anchorage?
    In both instances the food would be stored and returned to in the food caches and park centres etc.

    The trip is about a month away now, so every detail needs to be sorted.

    Thanks a bunch guys!

  14. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Newky View Post
    One thing still alludes me here guys, and that is mostly the "how" and "where" questions.

    As far as I'm aware there are little to no amenities in denali N park, so all food for the 30 day duration must be purchased beforehand. The how - would it be best to buy online/via phone a bulk order of food to be delivered to the park? If so, who would be able to do this? OR would it be best to buy the entire food requirements whilst I am in Anchorage?
    In both instances the food would be stored and returned to in the food caches and park centres etc.

    The trip is about a month away now, so every detail needs to be sorted.

    Thanks a bunch guys!
    I'd buy while your in anchorage.
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  15. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by FurFishGame View Post
    I'd buy while your in anchorage.
    You reckon I could haul a month's food from Anchorage to Denali?

  16. #36
    Member tboehm's Avatar
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    how much actual hiking and outdoor experience do you have? I get the feeling that it's very little and would want to see you getting yourself "In to the Wild" TROUBLE
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  17. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by tboehm View Post
    how much actual hiking and outdoor experience do you have? I get the feeling that it's very little and would want to see you getting yourself "In to the Wild" TROUBLE
    Appreciate the concern.

    I have not encountered the situation where I haven't been able to carry all of my food with me, as I have not been camping for such a long period of time in one go (over 7 days). I have also never been to Alaska. The result of these two things means that I must seek as much information as possible on both planning food intake for the duration and also most importantly, the logistics of doing this up in Alaska. The idea behind going during the summer to a popular national park is to reduce the risks as much as possible.

    I will be frank. I believe I have enough knowledge to do fine on this trip, bar the things I'm asking about here. Experience-wise, as a 20 year old, sure, my experience does not compare to a lot of people on here, but younger people than me have managed Everest so I'm not overly deterred.

  18. #38
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    This is really outside of my experience, and it's not something I would be interested in doing at this stage of my life, but it has none the less been interesting to keep up with the discussion.

    But about portion control: I think you should mostly be concerned with the amount of calories needed to maintain body weight, or at least get close to that goal. I maintain my weight eating about 2000 calories per day and start to loose weight at about 1800 calories. But I'm older and more sedentary than you so you undoubtedly burn more calories than I when just sitting about. Once you start hiking, exploring, setting up camp and just general living outdoors, I would guess your calorie burn rate is closer to 4000 per day, but that is a very personal figure and everyone's different.

    If I were you I would go on a 4-7 day hike/camp eating 4000 calories a day, weigh myself before & after, and adjust accordingly. You will inevitably loose some weight, you just want to keep from loosing too much. Then plan your food supply accordingly.

    When you are out there you will also need to practice portion control. Some people will want to eat everything available in short order simply because it's there. Others will have to force themselves to eat sufficiently to maintain something close to normal body weight. Also, don't eat all the "good stuff" the first week.

    I would also plan for a "bail out" option. So if critical equipment fails or you run out of food, you have the opportunity to return to civilization earlier than planned. And have a 911 option as well. If you break a leg, etc. you need a way to bail out now. ---- But by all means have fun with this. It's sounds like a great adventure.

  19. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Strutz View Post
    This is really outside of my experience, and it's not something I would be interested in doing at this stage of my life, but it has none the less been interesting to keep up with the discussion.

    But about portion control: I think you should mostly be concerned with the amount of calories needed to maintain body weight, or at least get close to that goal. I maintain my weight eating about 2000 calories per day and start to loose weight at about 1800 calories. But I'm older and more sedentary than you so you undoubtedly burn more calories than I when just sitting about. Once you start hiking, exploring, setting up camp and just general living outdoors, I would guess your calorie burn rate is closer to 4000 per day, but that is a very personal figure and everyone's different.

    If I were you I would go on a 4-7 day hike/camp eating 4000 calories a day, weigh myself before & after, and adjust accordingly. You will inevitably loose some weight, you just want to keep from loosing too much. Then plan your food supply accordingly.

    When you are out there you will also need to practice portion control. Some people will want to eat everything available in short order simply because it's there. Others will have to force themselves to eat sufficiently to maintain something close to normal body weight. Also, don't eat all the "good stuff" the first week.

    I would also plan for a "bail out" option. So if critical equipment fails or you run out of food, you have the opportunity to return to civilization earlier than planned. And have a 911 option as well. If you break a leg, etc. you need a way to bail out now. ---- But by all means have fun with this. It's sounds like a great adventure.
    Fantastic post thanks Jim.

    4000 Calories matches up roughly with what I had in mind, based on the military diet of around 4200.
    I'm also going on a 7 day camp beforehand in some similar wilderness nearer to me, as you say. It will be very useful as a benchmark for a lot of things, including food - intake, weight etc. Nice idea to weigh myself before and after, I hadn't thought of that.

    My last resort is a personal locator beacon. Absolute last resort of course. Not to replace proper navigation and planning.

    Say, you're based in Anchorage - you know somewhere I could stock up on a month of camping food? I don't see any alternative besides having all the food delivered to denali park HQ.

  20. #40
    Member Daveintheburbs's Avatar
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    To answer one of your basic questions: Anchorage has numerious places to pick up supplies. Start with lots of basic grocery stores. Then outdoor shops from Wiggys through Sportsman's warehouse and REI to the outdoor sections of Walmart and Fred Myers. Price increases and supply diminishes rapidly as you go north.

    I have not bought a 30 day one man supply at once here , but I have bought a 7-15 day supply for 2-25 people lots of times.

    Make a list, rent a car, and just go shopping.

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