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Thread: Is it just me or is researching drawing tags one of the funner winter past times?

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    Default Is it just me or is researching drawing tags one of the funner winter past times?

    I am newer to the forum, but I am amazed by how many threads are started right after drawing results come out asking about tags people drew without knowing much about them. I may have more time on my hands then most but, I have a lot of fun during the early winter looking everything up. I spend more time then I would like to admit researching drawing tags that I know I am a long shot to draw, which I didn't this year .

    I know that most people on this forum do their homework before they put in their drawings, but am I the only one that really enjoys the process and consider it a fun way to occupy those long winter days and nights?

    I am not trying to rip those who are looking for advice on draw hunts or claim they are in anyway lazy or undeserving. I was just curious to see how much time people spend looking up drawing hunts and how they view that time... fun? excruciatingly boring? so-so?

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    Congrat's on last years goat and caribou tags. How did it go?

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    Ya know I think its just one of those things.People put in for different areas and different tags for different reasons I guess.Me I put in mostly for what I consider high quality low draw areas.I think others might see a higher draw rate and put in without checking into it. Ya know the good thing is a lot of them come on here and ask and to me that is better then wasting the tag.

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    Member duckslayer56's Avatar
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    I reasearched my tags quite a bit. Ever since I read the sheep hunting stories here last august, and saw the amazing scenery in the pics, I have gotten the desire to experience it myself. I started planning, and researching then. I started by reading Tony Russ' books, as well as Ace Sommerfield's book, and The Quest for Dall Sheep. I am still on the look out for more sheep books. I was hoping I could bump into Tony Russ at one of the gun shows around here (I hear he is at a bunch of them). I would like to ask him some questions about stalking, and general tactics. I spend my weekends going over my gear lists, trying to eliminate what I don't need, as well as check into weight and durability of things I do need. I had been pouring over maps of the Talkeetnas, Wrangells, and Alaska Range trying to narrow down an area I want to hunt. Me and my hunting partner are planning on spending a lot of the summer in the mountians, just trying to learn to get close to the sheep.

    I only put in for sheep tags this year, and we were very fortunate to draw one. That helped narrow down the area we are going to hunt. I know how I am going to access the area I am going to. I am also going to try to get a fly in to the spot I am hunting this summer and spend a couple days looking it over and trying to make some game plans. Hopefully spotting a couple 40 inch rams in the area as well.

    I have been laying awake at night, just going over stuff in my head for this hunt. Most of the advice I am seeking is about the hunting portion itself, as I have never sheep hunted before. There are a lot of guys on here who are dedicated sheep hunters who have probably forgotten more about it than most will ever learn. What better place to ask for advice than here.

    Like you, I love the research that goes into a hunt, the planning, and logistics. The only problem is, when you are doing all of this, it gets you more and more excited to go, making the wait for opening day excruciating!
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    Member oakman's Avatar
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    There are certainly things I will research before applying for tags. For instance, I'll check at what type of access there is (this year I only applied for tags that had road access of some type). A few years ago I applied for a Kodiak goat tag that had a high chance of drawing, so I wanted to look into fly out costs first.

    But...when I'm applying for a tag that has less than a 5% chance of drawing, I'm not going to put in a lot of in depth research. I might know before hand about how much it will cost me to hunt there, but I'm not going to put in many hours of work for each tag.

    I guess I just have better things to do with my time that plan for something that probably won't happen anyway.

    Now once I do get something, I'm all over it.

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    Premium Member denalihunter's Avatar
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    I know generally most area's of the State, but there are some who think you should spend a few years scouting before you even put in for a drawing tag. I had never hunted in the TMA, or for sheep, but I knew it was a good tag and I'd figured to sort out the rest if I ever got drawn, which I did and was successful. So, no, I didn't spend weeks and weeks studying and years wandering around the TMA so I could be prepared if the day ever came after way more than 20 years of trying. I also apply for bison every year, but I'm not spending much time on up front research, hanging around Delta. You have nearly 6 months to do your research after you draw. There is no hunt that I can't do, so why does it matter to others if I don't do it?
    And besides, if I do draw a tag, even for an area I'm fairly familier with, I'm still going to ask on here. I've been here on this website over 10 years, and I know the knowledge of this site, so why not ask? I've got a lot of great help too! I also am the first to volunteer help and info for tags and area's that I've hunted.
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    Member AKducks's Avatar
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    yes researching a tag if fun but its much more fun researching a tag that you have drawn knowing that you can hunt adds to the excitement. and if anyone has questions about their tag DON'T BE AFRAID TO ASK ON THIS SITE, I think most people would rather have you ask questions and enjoy your tag then just waste the tag on a bad hunt that doesn't have much chance of success.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    I make sure that I can feasibly do a hunt before applying (cost, reasonable access, expected time), but like others here, I might not research the hunt down to the last detail until I win it. Even for areas that I know well, I tend to ask folks I know and/or post a thread here in search of additional information. The goat tag my wife won this year is a good example. I knew when we put in for it that we could access the area and have a good chance of taking a goat. Apart from any additional information, I'm still confident that is true. That being said, I still asked a friend that knows the area better than myself if he had any bits of wisdom to share. After that conversation, I now have another valley or two that I need to scout this fall. We could have done the hunt without asking for others'
    advice, but there is value in more information.

    I'm assuming this thread is mostly in reference to those who haven't got a clue and come on here asking the most basic of questions about their tags. I agree that it can be frustrating to read, especially when the tag is one of the more coveted ones (and one that I applied for unsuccessfully), but as has been noted again and again, F&G figures into their tag allocation that a good percentage of permit winners will never set foot in the field. I hate seeing coveted tags go to waste, but if they were all well-researched and utilized, the chance to win a permit would go down as the number of permits available would be less than it currently is.

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    Interesting responses so far, I just want to reiterate that I was not trying to complain about the amount of threads started by people trying to gain information on tags they drew. I have asked for advice on tags on the forum before and I think it is a great way to gain knowledge on tags from fellow hunters that you would be hard to come across in your everyday life. I was just seeing if others enjoyed the time researching draw permits (especially low chance ones) that they know more likely then not they will not be able to hunt them.

    In response to Wet eNuf, I was pretty fortunate last season and drew a party tag DG342 with my good buddy and we were able to harvest two nice billies. I didn't draw a caribou tag last year but went on a father son hunt up on the haul road. I was able to get a caribou with my bow on the first day of my first ever bow hunt. Very fun and exciting trip. I tried to post pictures over on the photo thread but I was having difficulty doing it. I am pretty sure that it was because I don't have very many post yet, even though I spend a decent amount of time reading this forum. I guess I need to make it a point to post more often.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    jp - Posting photos isn't linked to membership status. Let me know if you ever need help in the future.

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    Jp- Just to reassure you that you aren't the only one; I've been spending the past 2 or 3 weeks downloading maps from Fish and Game's website and cross-referencing them with USGS topo maps and Google Earth. I don't even want to discuss the (pitiful) moss calling I've been doing around the house, much to the amusement of my room mates and dog.

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    I research all of the permits that I put in for beforehand. The idea of getting drawn for a permit for an area that is outside of my means to get access to doesn't sit well with me. After all, hunting is also about game management and it doesn't do anyone any good to have permits awarded to folks who will never hunt the area.

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