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Thread: Any insight on DG347 needed.

  1. #1

    Default Any insight on DG347 needed.

    I got DG347 and can not seem to find much info on hunting this tag. Please any info will help. Thanks for your time, thoughts and ideas.
    I do have a boat, am fit enough to hike a good bit.
    I have never hunted goats before, so basic info would be great.
    Christian

  2. #2
    Member TMCKEE's Avatar
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    "Book a public use cabin at Caines Head...sleep well, then head up the mountain" This is something that was told to me a couple years ago and has led me to put in for this drawing every year since (unsuccessfully). Good Luck.

  3. #3
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    Start lookin at pictures of billies vs nannies, most are very challenging to tell apart. Also, try to see which ones are around 9", that is the "trophy" ##, but honestly, any mt goat is a trophy
    Missing the greatest state in the Union!

  4. #4
    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
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    Goats are not hard to hunt...they're hard to get to. Generally they're keyed into threats from below so you have to get up to where they are, or want to be. Above them is best as they're not too worried about stuff above them. The occasional tinkle of rocks sloughing off the mountain is a normal sound in their world so if you tumble some shale here and there on a careful stalk don't worry too much, but the distinct pattern of footfalls will send them into the cliffs.

    If there's no trail to the top where you're hunting then your best bet is to carefully select a route up that doubles as a safe route back down with 125lbs of goat on your back. I would actually select a pacth through alders for the handhold and on the way up carry a bow saw and make some strategic cuts. If your likely route is particularly steep I would seriously consider investing in a 10-11mm climbing rope (or two) plus a harness, carabiners, and rappelling 8. Then set a fixed line(s) that will enable you to safely descend under a heavy load.

    As for the hunt itself respect their eyes and don't skyline yourself and glass, glass, glass! Find the goats with the bino's then look them over with the spotter. Billies aren't white, they're more of a creamy, almost white and their haunches tend towards a yellow tinge. A billy on a dark hillside looks white but a billy on snow looks dingy yellow. The trick to ID'ing them is the horns. Nanny horns tend to have a very slender taper to them where billy horns have a broader, triangular bases. The only way to really tell is wait for them to look in your general direction. From the head-on view the taper is obvious. As for trophy status? A billy with horns equal to, or longer than the distance from his eyes to the end of his nose is at least a 9 incher and very likely to make B&C (if that interests you). Another trick to ID'ing them is how they pee. Billies use the urinal...just kidding. Nannies squat somewhat like female dogs while billies stretch forward lowering their pelvis towards the ground. They kind of look like they might start doing push-ups. If you find them bedded, watch and wait for them to stand and relieve themselves...good initial way to save yourself the effort of a long arduous stalk.

    If a goat catches you out in the open at a mile or less, freeze where you are unless you're skylined in which case you drop and wait for the goat to relax. Might be 2 minutes, might be 2 hours. Goat's are pretty nonchalant--they just seem to casually cruise around their world. Unlike sheep they don't tend to panic and bolt. If disturbed they just steadily hop their way up into the cliffs and will generally cycle back through that same spot the following day, weather permitting.

    The real trick to goat hunting is having patience enough to catch them on "good" ground and to kill them quickly before they have a chance to fling themselves into the void, which, given a chance, they will. We often think of goats as cliff dwellers and while they certainly can negotiate cliffs easily they use saddles and benches and ridge tops and other places where they can be safely gotten too once killed. If you shoot a goat bedded on a tiny ledge on a cliff face you're wasting a perfectly good goat.

    Bottom line: The very first consideration of goat hunting is where the goat will come to rest after it's killed.

    Goats aren't true goats by the way. They're actually members of the antelope family and their meat is very good.

    Also, even if you don't plan a full body mount take the whole hide and have it tanned.
    If cave men had been trophy hunters the Wooly Mammoth would be alive today

  5. #5
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    How did you make out on your hunt last year. What would you have to tell me for a hunt this year. This will also be my first time to hunt goats.

  6. #6
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    How did you make out on your hunt last year. What would you have to tell me for a hunt this year. This will also be my first time to hunt goats.


    Quote Originally Posted by lasthillbilly View Post

    I got DG347 and can not seem to find much info on hunting this tag. Please any info will help. Thanks for your time, thoughts and ideas.
    I do have a boat, am fit enough to hike a good bit.
    I have never hunted goats before, so basic info would be great.
    Christian

  7. #7
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Feb 2012
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    Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
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    Quote Originally Posted by Erik in AK View Post
    Goats are not hard to hunt...they're hard to get to. Generally they're keyed into threats from below so you have to get up to where they are, or want to be. Above them is best as they're not too worried about stuff above them. The occasional tinkle of rocks sloughing off the mountain is a normal sound in their world so if you tumble some shale here and there on a careful stalk don't worry too much, but the distinct pattern of footfalls will send them into the cliffs.

    If there's no trail to the top where you're hunting then your best bet is to carefully select a route up that doubles as a safe route back down with 125lbs of goat on your back. I would actually select a pacth through alders for the handhold and on the way up carry a bow saw and make some strategic cuts. If your likely route is particularly steep I would seriously consider investing in a 10-11mm climbing rope (or two) plus a harness, carabiners, and rappelling 8. Then set a fixed line(s) that will enable you to safely descend under a heavy load.

    As for the hunt itself respect their eyes and don't skyline yourself and glass, glass, glass! Find the goats with the bino's then look them over with the spotter. Billies aren't white, they're more of a creamy, almost white and their haunches tend towards a yellow tinge. A billy on a dark hillside looks white but a billy on snow looks dingy yellow. The trick to ID'ing them is the horns. Nanny horns tend to have a very slender taper to them where billy horns have a broader, triangular bases. The only way to really tell is wait for them to look in your general direction. From the head-on view the taper is obvious. As for trophy status? A billy with horns equal to, or longer than the distance from his eyes to the end of his nose is at least a 9 incher and very likely to make B&C (if that interests you). Another trick to ID'ing them is how they pee. Billies use the urinal...just kidding. Nannies squat somewhat like female dogs while billies stretch forward lowering their pelvis towards the ground. They kind of look like they might start doing push-ups. If you find them bedded, watch and wait for them to stand and relieve themselves...good initial way to save yourself the effort of a long arduous stalk.

    If a goat catches you out in the open at a mile or less, freeze where you are unless you're skylined in which case you drop and wait for the goat to relax. Might be 2 minutes, might be 2 hours. Goat's are pretty nonchalant--they just seem to casually cruise around their world. Unlike sheep they don't tend to panic and bolt. If disturbed they just steadily hop their way up into the cliffs and will generally cycle back through that same spot the following day, weather permitting.

    The real trick to goat hunting is having patience enough to catch them on "good" ground and to kill them quickly before they have a chance to fling themselves into the void, which, given a chance, they will. We often think of goats as cliff dwellers and while they certainly can negotiate cliffs easily they use saddles and benches and ridge tops and other places where they can be safely gotten too once killed. If you shoot a goat bedded on a tiny ledge on a cliff face you're wasting a perfectly good goat.

    Bottom line: The very first consideration of goat hunting is where the goat will come to rest after it's killed.

    Goats aren't true goats by the way. They're actually members of the antelope family and their meat is very good.

    Also, even if you don't plan a full body mount take the whole hide and have it tanned.
    Great commentary Erik...!!!
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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