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Thread: Mtn Goat Equipment

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    Default Mtn Goat Equipment

    Hello all. I had a question IRT Mtn Goat Equipment. As a first timer who has finally drawn a goat tag, I am wondering what kind of gear most of you experts take along. As I researched my area, I read more than a few threads that recommended carrying the ice axe that extends into a trekking pole. Rope (about 175 ft)was also mentioned to possibly help in retrieving a goat. The in-step crampons were also mentioned. I would assume that most gear that works for a sheep hunt will also work just fine for goats.

    What other kind of specialized gear would you recommend?

    I appreciate any help you choose to give.

    V/R
    Moose44

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    What area did you draw specifically? Not all goat country is created equally. Additionally, what time of year are you planning to hunt? My pack will carry different gear if hunting goats in August as compared to October.

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    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    +1 for instep crampons
    Most would say only use rope if you have good experience. It may get you in more trouble than it's worth. Along with that rope I'd have a competent partner that knows also how to use it. Get someone new to hunting yet skilled in climbing to assist you on the hunt.

    Also Goats can be the big, two people on a technical pack out is appropriate.

    Ice axes are cool yet I find myself using treking poles more often and I'm not going to bring two poles and an axe.

    Good boots to protect your feet on the rocks and have a solid edge for technical work.

    Laser range finder, the distances up there are decieving. Know your target distance.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bighorse View Post

    Good boots to protect your feet on the rocks and have a solid edge for technical work.
    #1 thing....as far as I'm concerned....

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    your list should be pretty much the same as for a sheep hunt and there are several good lists floating around here.An ice axe well walking axe as they are longer to me is a must in goat country and if you ever get into a slide situation you can self arest and perhaps save your life. Rope like Bighorse said worthless unless youknow what you are doing.Good boots a must,I wear plastics as shale can tear up leather but any good mountain boot will work.Tactics can be different depending on where you are hunting.Feel free to pm me if you have any questions
    dave

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    Another thumbs up for the non-technical crampons. I have a pair of Kahtools (spelling?) that I purchased at Barney's in Anchorage. If I remeber correctly they are 6 point crampons (No front or rear facing points) and fit well with my Lowa boots. They made a real difference walking on the steep wet grass slopes. Also, like others have said, some of what you bring really will depend on your hunting location and dates (ie. Kodiak vs Unit 13/14c or August vs. October). Have fun in the high country. In my book, goat hunting and sheep hunting are the most challenging, fun, beautiful and rewarding hunts that I've ever done.

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    +1 for the Kahtoola KTS crampons, they make Aluminum 19oz or steel 23.3oz. They have come in very handy on both goat and sheep hunts for me, also good for slippery water crossings!...don't forget the rope too!......

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ramhunter View Post
    the Kahtoola KTS crampons...also good for slippery water crossings!
    Really? You wear the crampons when crossing creeks? I would have thought they would be more slippery on rocks than the soles of your boots. Very interesting. I only have experience with crampons on snow and ice, but it looks like I'll be adding a set to my quiver for summer and fall.

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    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    It's that snotty decaying vegetation on a steep slope that will earn you a medivac. I love rock.

    There has been a few times I wish I had a nice line to repel onto a nice bench while goat hunting. Trouble is a 60m rope is heavy, add anchors, webbing, harness, caribieners, and cams and your looking at a heavy mountaineering expedition. Worth it? Maybe.

    The trouble is once you drop into a location you better be **** sure you can get out with a load on your back.

    I'd be curious how many hunters on here have used mountaineering gear to access sheep and goat country? I have yet to do it other than a few set lines through dangerous sections.

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    These are required items in my goat pack.



    "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"
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    Quote Originally Posted by stid2677 View Post
    These are required items in my goat pack.



    Mr Steve how sturdy do those telescoping walking axes feel as compared to the solid ones(non telescoping)
    Dave

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bear View Post
    Mr Steve how sturdy do those telescoping walking axes feel as compared to the solid ones(non telescoping)
    Dave

    I have never had an issue with my Stubai flexing at all. Never have tried one of the solid ones, they seem like they would be hard to travel with.

    Makes a good anchor as well. Was nice to use it to stop my deer from sliding down hill.

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    Member ramhunter's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=Brian M;1087599]Really? You wear the crampons when crossing creeks? I would have thought they would be more slippery on rocks than the soles of your boots. Very interesting. I only have experience with crampons on snow and ice, but it looks like I'll be adding a set to my quiver for summer and fall.[/QUOTE

    I used them last fall to cross a fast flowing glacial river, my son and friend didn't have any on and I made it across in about half the time it took them with less effort!...

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    Quote Originally Posted by stid2677 View Post
    I have never had an issue with my Stubai flexing at all. Never have tried one of the solid ones, they seem like they would be hard to travel with.

    Makes a good anchor as well. Was nice to use it to stop my deer from sliding down hill.

    Thanks for the info.Thought about switchin over just never knew anyone that used them in the field. They do make great anchors,I have used them to keep sheep from sliding,I also like using them along with crampons on slick steep grass slopes as a stronger handhold. thanks again

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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bear View Post
    Thanks for the info.Thought about switchin over just never knew anyone that used them in the field. They do make great anchors,I have used them to keep sheep from sliding,I also like using them along with crampons on slick steep grass slopes as a stronger handhold. thanks again
    It does work great using it to pull yourself up slick and muddy terrain. Was also surprised how well the crampons worked for crossing creeks and climbing when the top layer is thawing and frozen underneath.

    Steve
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    Quote Originally Posted by stid2677 View Post
    It does work great using it to pull yourself up slick and muddy terrain. Was also surprised how well the crampons worked for crossing creeks and climbing when the top layer is thawing and frozen underneath.

    Steve
    Many years ago I would of never thought to take such items but once I used them (axe and crampons) I like you would never enter sheep and goat country without.....
    Dave

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    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    I won one of the Stubai's at a banquet last year but it doesn't have the walking stick extension. Would you pack it along? Seems like if you had the walking stick type that I'd be more likely to actually have it in my hand when things got slippery and I started to go south....the other one I could see leaving strapped to my pack most of the time.

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    Thats what I love about this forum. Even" know- it alls like myself" can learn from my own experience but also from fellow members about new gear and ideas. On a goat hunt in the early " 80s" near hope I was hunting with a freind of mine and we split up to cover more ground. It had turned from rain to snow as we began our stalk and sidehilling on a steep slope of moss and berry patches now covered in a small layer of wet snow I lost footing and with raingear took off like sled . Knowing that a couple of 100 ft. below me the slope dropped off strait into a large boulder feild, I became very aware of the spot I had put myself into. I covered half that distance in mere seconds looseing my rifle along the way. Still on my, back my packframe and my heels of of my boots dug in to a small rock ledge along with my gloved fingertips and hung there just taking in the veiw for a few moments.It took a little while but I finally worked my way off the slope and back down to the truck. This is just one of many ways I tryed to kill or maime myself through the years hunting and guideing in Ak. Did I learn from each episode? I"m still alive so I must have.Crampons are a must for all high mountain hunting and I'm going to look into one of those hikeing axes also. Thanks for the info. Ron.

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    Member Roger45's Avatar
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    I used my instep crampons for all activities while goat hunting (except sleep) until I got my first pair of 6 points. The two extra points on the heel make a huge difference in any wet or steep conditions. Trekking poles have replaced my climbing axe too. I hike the Chugach range year round and always use either or both.
    "...and then Jack chopped down the beanstock, adding murder and ecological vandalism to the theft, enticement and vandalism charges already mentioned, but he got away with it and lived happily ever after without so much as a guilty twinge about what he had done. Which proves that you can be excused just about anything if you're a hero, because no one asks the inconvenient questions." Terry Pratchett's The Hogfather

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    As far as ice axes or walking axes are concrened there are several sizes so for the new guys I just wanted to point that out. My walking axe is I believe 100cm and I believe the adjustable stubai that I asked Stid2677 goes from 60cm to 95cm I believe and an ice axe is much shorter as is designed for strictly verticle climbing...

    Dave

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