Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Solar vs Wind mill: My cabin has LOTS of wind on hill, winter/summer.

  1. #1

    Default Solar vs Wind mill: My cabin has LOTS of wind on hill, winter/summer.

    well, anyone know of a good windmill charging system? My gold mining cabin is on a hill that gets LOTS of wind in the winter and summer! But, lots of snow in the winter makes for a tough time keeping it clean, etc..so, was wanting to see if anyone had a good, decently priced wind mill, etc they could recommend..
    Scotty in the AK bush

  2. #2

    Default

    AIR 403 by southwest about $700 noisey but good the X version makes radio noisey though

  3. #3
    Member OHTroy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    88

    Default

    Go with the zero maintenance solar panel and let someone else play around with a wind mill. Just my experience.

  4. #4

    Default

    I lived for many years on a wind and diesel generator system. Like you we had a lot of wind. The problem is storing the energy for the times you do not have enough wind. The battery systems were a real pain. I remember climbing the 100 foot tower in the Winter to fix various problems. Not fun! Solar is problematic in the Winter. Bottom line is there is no real subsitute for grid power. All alternative systems have issues if you want consistent power in quantity. Sorry I can't be more positive. You can make it work, just be ready to spend a lot of time and money.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,293

    Default

    If I had wind potential I'd use it but only in concert with other sources of recharge power like solar and a generator. The best off-grid solution is to have year-round falling water and a turbine but that's not available for most of us. I use solar to supplement a generator system and it works well enough to rationalize it. How much solar to how much gennie is subjective to the site and the user. Batteries need good charging and overcharging on a regular basis and for me that requires a generator. During the summer when solar intake exceeds use is a great situation but it doesn't last into the dark months. Renewable energy is an evolving science. Go visit a good RE vender like Renewable Energy Systems on Dimond or AK Battery on Potter. They can help you sort out your options and decide what makes sense. There's lots of info on the web but not much that's specific to Alaskan conditions. I just bought new batteries and a new inverter from Renewable Energy and was very pleased with the service and expertise. What I knew 10 years ago no longer applies with the current products and technology. I find that very exciting. Renewable energy is fun. Forget what you thought you knew and go find out what's available now.

  6. #6
    Member KelvinG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Talkeetna, AK
    Posts
    387

    Default

    I’ve got a Whisperwind 200 and am really disappointed in its performance. I live on the Talkeetna River, have my windmill on a 60ft tower, and have pretty constant wind.

    I think my problem is a combination of Windmill manufactures over estimating their low speed performance and me just eyeballing my wind potential. I used guidelines to estimate wind speed, (how much tree limbs were bending, etc.) and kept notes over a 6 month period. But this windmill produces about ¼ of what I was expecting.

    They claim it starts producing power at 6 mph, in reality its closer to 12 mph. I called the manufacture and went through all the troubleshooting stuff with them. Their final response was “Well, I’m sure once the wind starts blowing more, you’ll really like our product. Goodbye”. After a lot of reading I believe its standard industry practice to over-estimate low speed performance. Also the wind has to be a constant speed, not gusty. This money would have been better spent on solar cells, batteries, or a new rifle!

    My advice to you is rent or buy an anemometer and log your wind potential for 6 or 8 months at the location were you want to install a windmill. Then if your wind potential isn’t at least 1/3 of the way up their power graph, forget it. Don’t waste your money.

    And I second Mr. PID's advice about Renewable Energy in Anchorage. Good honest people to work with. I do most all of my business with them now.

    Kelvin

  7. #7

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •