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Thread: Heeler problems.

  1. #1
    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    Default Heeler problems.

    I am babysitting a red heeler. When he wants outside he screams very loud for a few seconds. When he goes out with my dogs he snaps at them while screaming. He is very quiet in the house unless he wants something, then he makes mild screams. Any ideas on how to fix this problem?

    Thanks,
    Mike

  2. #2
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    No real help but I really don't like those dogs. A neighbor had one and it laid our puppy open from ear to eye. My only suggestion is to verify that the owner is actually coming back for the dog then give it back to them!!

  3. #3
    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
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    The dog is communicating the only way he knows how. You might try the sharp "Shhh!" as soon as the yelping starts. Then walk him over to wherever you were when it started, bring him to heel, say Outside? and put him out. Eventually he'll make the connection that to go outside he has to get you first. In the intirim, it's better than peeing in your house. As far as him herding your other dogs around the yard? It's what heelers do.

    If the herding concerns you put him out separately from your dogs.
    If cave men had been trophy hunters the Wooly Mammoth would be alive today

  4. #4
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    I'm guessing he was taught to be vocal to be let out, something I don't condone. If your sitting the dog for the short term it might not be worth the fight. If your stuck with him long term just start letting him know what you expect and that the loud screaming is not tolerated. Be ready to apply pressure once you know he knows what you want. Getting to rough with your others dogs....don't allow it and get as strong a position as you need to make him stop. Take the position of the Alpha Male and push your weight around as much as needed to maintain control of your entire pack. I would not leave the Heeler alone with other dogs at this time and when he is with the other dogs, make sure he knows your watching. Hope it works out for ya. duckdon

  5. #5
    Member Hoyt's Avatar
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    You're painting broad strokes over the entire breed LuJon. One bad dog shouldn't condemn the entire breed. Heelers are exceptional dogs. Loyal and smart.
    "If I could shoot a game bird and still not hurt it, the way I can take a trout on a fly and release it, I doubt if I would kill another one." George Bird Evans

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