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Thread: Stand-up bars for freighters with S-D motors

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    Default Stand-up bars for freighters with S-D motors

    I've decided to mount a stand-up bar on my Hudson Bay this season. With my old 19'er, I used the handle of my lift for balance, but with the mud motor I don't have that option. So, time to come up with another method/design. Sometimes it's more efficient to drive the boat standing, rather than sitting ... particularly when looking for the best route or obstacles hidden under water. One caveat: it must be able to fold down below the height of the gunnels, when necessary. I'd like to hear opinions and suggestions. Thanks.

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    I don't use one and personally find no need for one with this size of motors considering that the surface drive is relatively short too. If I hit some rough whitewater, I just get my weight low and grab hold of the gunwale. Back in 2010 I test drove a 27 hp go-devil longtail. Now this is a motor that you need a grab bar while you leverage that pig around to make a sharp turn. The weight difference between that motor and your surface drive would be near a hundred lbs, not to mention the extra length of the tail.

    My lady did a sequence of pictures when we turned our canoe broadside to a mild chute of white water. Here are a couple of them so you can get an idea of what I'm talking about:

    first picture, riding atop of the standing waves/fast chute which wasn't unstable feeling at all.
    second picture, the effect of fast standing waves of the chute blasting the boat side ways. (it was blurry for a reason)


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    finally, the gunwale grab while getting my weight down low, not because of boat stability issues (the canoe is only about 2 inches less width than your Hudson Bay), but to prevent myself from loosing balance:

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    Default It's tough to judge proportions

    Quote Originally Posted by mainer_in_ak View Post
    "the gunwale grab"
    That picture looks like you've got a dainty little (girl) hand.

    In reality, of course, your hands are quite large, and the gunnel is EXTREMELY large, and tough too. I watched you careen your gunnel off a massive column of concrete last summer. (Yeah yeah yeah, I know, you've watched me hit way more stuff than I've seen you hit - its true)

    Yours truly,

    The Owner of the "Rock Magnet"

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    I built a fold down bar for my Cargo that works well. There are pictures under the Esquif Cargo threads.
    Somewhere along the way I have lost the ability to act politically correct. If you should find it, please feel free to keep it.

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    So far, Lowrider, your system is the prime candidate. I like it much more than the stand-up bar I bought, as an accessary, from MB.

    By the way, I've been making high tech racing dogsleds out of 2024 and 7075 aluminum tubing for a long time. I think my technique of bending handle bars may be of use to you. It's next to impossible to bend high strength tubing to precise dimensions when you need more than one bend. I bend handles in 2 identical pieces and then splice them in the center with either UMHW rod or a small piece of aluminum tubing. That way I can tailor the width precisely. I cover the handle bars with a quality foam tubing made for mountain bike handle bars ... in severe cold, you can't feel the cold aluminum. Any way, this make an excellent fit easier than my old one piece system. With no loss of durability. I like your mounting system ... think it's the most applicable for a canoe. Thanks.

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    Hey Rick, check this out. Zack


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    Hey Zack ...

    I like your bar. The tubing has a useful shape. I'd like my bar to be able to fold down, below gunwale level, for those times on skinny streams, when brush, etc., is dragging over the top of the rig. I think you and Lowrider are headed in the right direction, for me.

    I'm guessing your boat is an Osagian? Nice rig, and I particularly admire your lift. I had a nearly identical one on my departed 19' Grumman for 10 years. Using it was instinctive and greatly enhanced the boat's utility. Thanks for the post/pic.

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    with that bar, lift handle, an gas control should take care of most of the problems I know some people won't like it but I do , if you are in big water it might not help, but if it is thin water with rocks just under the surface you need to stand up, so you can see what is in front of the canoe it saves the bottom of the canoe a lot, you can't read the water seting down, I don't know anybody that can
    SID

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    You're right, Sid. Another situation, while standing, is where you can't see something that's lurking under murky water, that the hull is going to run over and give you a surprise. I'd like to have a handle to minimize the excitement. Heck, my Toyota pickup has grab handles, that my wife swears are necessary, when I'm driving. I have a friend who unexpectedly got dumped out of his square stern canoe last season. Wasn't a big deal, but was unexpected. On my Hudson Bay, the rear thwart is too far forward to reach while standing. I believe kandik, owner and creator of the "pimped out Hudson Bay", uses the top of his fold-up windscreen as a standup bar. Makes sense to me.

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    Default standup bar for pimped out freighter

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick View Post
    You're right, Sid. Another situation, while standing, is where you can't see something that's lurking under murky water, that the hull is going to run over and give you a surprise. I'd like to have a handle to minimize the excitement. Heck, my Toyota pickup has grab handles, that my wife swears are necessary, when I'm driving. I have a friend who unexpectedly got dumped out of his square stern canoe last season. Wasn't a big deal, but was unexpected. On my Hudson Bay, the rear thwart is too far forward to reach while standing. I believe kandik, owner and creator of the "pimped out Hudson Bay", uses the top of his fold-up windscreen as a standup bar. Makes sense to me.

    That's right Rick, I use the top of my windshield as a standup bar. Made of one inch stainless tubing.
    I only wish I had made a small cutout from the fabric to allow a serious grip. Maybe later.

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    If you use Zack design and modified the base making it 6-8 inches high and big enough for the handle bar to fit inside it could be in held in place by a locking pin. If you want it to fold down, making a swivel base would not be hard. Locking it in place is a little harder, you could use one of three methods, a locking scissor, locking slide or using a rod something like a car use to hold up the hood.

    Does any of this make sense?

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    It might not be as stable as a bar but I'm 5'4" and end up standing a lot for river running w/ my HB. I have a rope tied to the rear brace that helps me maintain balance. I picked up the idea from some of the old pics on the wooldridge website of old man wooldridge running some rivers down south.

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    blackhawkranch ...

    Hadn't thought of using a rope for balance. That's the easiest idea yet. I may try it before I fabricate a more complicated system. Thanks. The old timers were amazingly adept at finding simple ways to make things work.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick View Post
    blackhawkranch ...

    Hadn't thought of using a rope for balance. That's the easiest idea yet. I may try it before I fabricate a more complicated system. Thanks. The old timers were amazingly adept at finding simple ways to make things work.
    About 15 years ago I saw an older man driving a big freighter down the Tanana below
    Nenana in nasty conditions and chop. He was holding on to a loop of rope tied to the front thwart while
    standing. Could have been a wet ride.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zack View Post
    Hey Rick, check this out. Zack

    yeah that looks nice safe compared to being foolish risking your life on a balancing act when you are out by yourself
    Visions Steel/841-WELD(9353)
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    Quote Originally Posted by ironartist View Post
    yeah that looks nice safe compared to being foolish risking your life on a balancing act when you are out by yourself
    I agree. Very nice. If I get one though, I'd like to extend that bottom angle support out another foot, put a rod holder on both sides, put a GPS mount of one of the sides, and have the bar fold down out of the way for "those" times, like storing it for winter, or while going under an obstruction where you want to be less tall.

  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick View Post
    Hey Zack ...

    I like your bar. The tubing has a useful shape. I'd like my bar to be able to fold down, below gunwale level, for those times on skinny streams, when brush, etc., is dragging over the top of the rig. I think you and Lowrider are headed in the right direction, for me.

    I'm guessing your boat is an Osagian? Nice rig, and I particularly admire your lift. I had a nearly identical one on my departed 19' Grumman for 10 years. Using it was instinctive and greatly enhanced the boat's utility. Thanks for the post/pic.
    Hi Rick and thanks. It works for me. It comes off in just a minute by the two small 'C' clamps, so no holes in the boat. I take it off and put in the bottom of the boat when casting sometimes. The bar is made out of 3/4" EMT and gas welded on to 1" angle. Not very visible in the pic but I welded long 1/4" bolts with the head and threads cut off at an angle on the back side for support. Very robust. Yes it's an Osagian. Went to the factory and picked it up several years ago. Zack

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    Rick,

    Here's the shots of my effort. I've since replaced the bolt with a 1/4" pin that is easy to pull and fold the bar down.




    I just got back from Idaho where some of the water is still hard. I took two kayaks, 3 canoes, 2 dirt bikes and a 4 wheeler out to my house and played in the snow for 9 days...skied, snowmachined, snowshoed and pushed snow with with a neighbor's tractor and had an all around great time with old and new friends. Now, if I could just get my wife to retire...but then...why!!
    Somewhere along the way I have lost the ability to act politically correct. If you should find it, please feel free to keep it.

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    Hi Lowrider. Your shop looks about like mine. If I had the equipment to weld aluminum I'd of built my bar out of a stick of 3/4" aluminum rigid electrical conduit. But I don't, so it's gas welding and steel for me. Zack

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