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Thread: Cat EFI starting problems

  1. #1

    Default Cat EFI starting problems

    This past weekend a group of us where riding in the Petersville area. We rode hard for most of the day, heading back to the cabin on fumes. The next morning, one of our sledís, a late model Arctic Cat M7 had trouble starting. The owner added two gallons of gas, from external tanks stored outside without any luck. We pulled a plug and added a few drops of gas. She fired up and then diedÖ. What would you do? Remember this model of Cat is EFI, so three pulls on the starting cord should do the trick.

    We deducted that the sled fuel pump might have water and frozen at the 15 degrees weather over night. Do we just add more gas and hope it works? How do you warm a sled, or gas tank in a safe manner?

    So here is what we did: We filled a bath tube with hot water, and placed a five gallon gas tank in the water for about 30 minutes. The gas warmed up enough to hiss when we opened the vent cap. After pouring the warm gas into the sledís gas tank, and adding a little gas to one cylinder, three pulls on the rope- wambo! It started. Was it just adding more gas, or was it the warm gas thawing the fuel pump? What do you think? Oh in case you are wondering we had two Polaris and two Ski-Doos that started right up.

  2. #2
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Nothing to do with make/model with this issue. An easier fix is to just heat water to near boiling and pour it over the fuel lines and pump. Has worked like a champ for me.

  3. #3

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    Good suggestion, but Arctic Cat's fuel pump is in the fuel tank....

  4. #4
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Yep. Sounds like you thawed the ice in the fuel pump and got it to move through the sled. That's a different solution, but it sounds like it worked. I'm sure the warm temps this weekend, plus the tunnel coolers warm up the fuel tank if it's close to freezing, allowed water to become liquid in the tank. Being that low on fuel allowed it get in the fuel pump and freeze overnight.

  5. #5

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    Can't remember just where I saw it, but there was a item that you hung off in the fuel tank that absorbed water. Won't mention what it looked like, but it had a string to retrieve it with. Maybe a good item to have in those tanks with the fuel pumps in them? Any time I fill up out of a gas can, I use one of the MR. Filters. The filter catches quite a few ice crystals as i pour.

  6. #6
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    They have them at the counter of Power Sports Stuff north of Wasilla.

  7. #7
    Member Dupont Spinner's Avatar
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    Not to argue the point of when and why it sucked up water but please remember the fuel pickups are in the lowest part of the tank always. There is two pickups one on the right and one on the left in a small sump on the sides of the tank right where most of the water collects. A good practice is to roll the sled up on one side and using an explosion proof flashlight check for water when the tank is real close to empty. I then use a hand vacumn pump and a stick to suck the water out of the bottom.

    Adding the warm fuel defrosted the ice but you still need to get the water out and not just a bottle of HEET.

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