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Thread: Any Spey Guys or Gals out there?

  1. #1
    Member CTobias's Avatar
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    Default Any Spey Guys or Gals out there?

    I'll be moving to Alaska at the end of the year. Just curious if there are any spey people out there? If so, what are you guys running for your line? Floating or sinking? I've only ever ran floating lines with poly leaders due to the shallow depth of most of the rivers I have fished on in my area, but I am hearing grumblings of people who run sinking lines out there to cut through the water fast and get down to the fish.

    Any info is much appreciated.

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    Member LItoAK's Avatar
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    I have been throwing a 6wt switch and a 8/9 spey. Skagit shooting heads on both. I have a MOW tip set up on the 6wt with a 10 foot floating tip and half floating and half sink tip. I use the full floating tip is great for weighted flies and the half sink is great for lighter flies. I am going to purchase a new spool for it also with some speydicator for floating nymphs and beads. I would probably only use sink tips on the larger rivers. the 8/9 is my King set up and I use both floating and sink tips for that also. So bring both floating and sink tips.

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    Member CTobias's Avatar
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    Good deal. I will have to start shopping for some line before I head out there.

  4. #4

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    It depends a lot on your fishing styles and casting skills, but I'd carry at least one full spey floating line. Long casts on big waters that require mends, the Skagit lines just don't cut it.

    I'm a geezer and admit it freely, but I've been using spey rods for going on 30 years. Fun to cast, effective for mending with a good spey line, but I absolutely HATE them for fighting fish. Geezerly, but I don't like fighting fish on 14' surf rods either. I cast well enough that I can use conventional 1-handers and reach things most guys are doing with Skagits and switches, so I can avoid using the longer rods until I need them. But that's not the point. On big waters Skagits lines on speys and switch rods can offer a distance advantage for the average caster, and sometimes the situation just calls for long casts- however you make them.

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    Member CTobias's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    It depends a lot on your fishing styles and casting skills, but I'd carry at least one full spey floating line. Long casts on big waters that require mends, the Skagit lines just don't cut it.

    I'm a geezer and admit it freely, but I've been using spey rods for going on 30 years. Fun to cast, effective for mending with a good spey line, but I absolutely HATE them for fighting fish. Geezerly, but I don't like fighting fish on 14' surf rods either. I cast well enough that I can use conventional 1-handers and reach things most guys are doing with Skagits and switches, so I can avoid using the longer rods until I need them. But that's not the point. On big waters Skagits lines on speys and switch rods can offer a distance advantage for the average caster, and sometimes the situation just calls for long casts- however you make them.

    I prefer Scandi lines since the mending is better than with a big heavy skagit. I'm searching for some nice sinking scandi heads for out there. Or would you reccomend just sticking with the full floating setup and a polyleader?

    I have no idea about what the rivers are like out there as far as depth and speed of water. The water I frequent is shallow water that is only running from 750 cubic feet per second (cfs) to 2500cfs at most.

  6. #6

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    I'm the wrong guy to ask about sink tips for rivers, cuzz I try to avoid them. Lots of line mending with weighted flies catches me more fish. But there are lots of guys who live and breathe with them. And they catch fish.

    As for waters, there's a whole range from too small to too large. I'm betting your current outfit is within reason for starting out. And since each of us casts and fishes differently on the same water, the best idea would be for you to get a firsthand look at the places before spending money on gear you might not like or need.

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    Member CTobias's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    I'm the wrong guy to ask about sink tips for rivers, cuzz I try to avoid them. Lots of line mending with weighted flies catches me more fish. But there are lots of guys who live and breathe with them. And they catch fish.

    As for waters, there's a whole range from too small to too large. I'm betting your current outfit is within reason for starting out. And since each of us casts and fishes differently on the same water, the best idea would be for you to get a firsthand look at the places before spending money on gear you might not like or need.

    I hear you on the money thing. I just don't want to get out there and not have what I need and then end up paying a buttload on shipping. I think I'll just head out there with a few different heads and see what works best.

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    Member G_Smolt's Avatar
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    I use what the conditions dictate.

    If I am fishing a large river with wide bars in calm conditions for smolt-eating fish, I will use a mid-belly floater (AirFlo Delta), an intermediate polyleader and a light fly.

    If I am spring steelheading on a brush-choked river with no set-up room and wind howling through a canyon, I'll fish an AirFlo skagit switch, 11' of t-14 and a big ugly fly.

    While swinging for kings in estuaries, I will use an intermediate skagit or a full-sinking scandi, both with lighter (t-7) sinking tips.

    A full-floater will get you going in the right direction, but isn't the best tool for many scenarios.

  9. #9

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    I dont do it as much as i would like to because of the lack of what i deem spey water in kodiak but nothing is more fun to cast than a spey rod IMO.

    I would just piggy back on what g smolt said.... there isn't a definive answer on floating or sinking or length or whatever. There are a variety of different waters or fish behavior that will dictate what is the best setup. Even the same river can have vastly different characteritics and fish behavior depending on the time of year

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    i use floating & sinking depending on conditions and what I'm fishing for.

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    Member CTobias's Avatar
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    I'm just going to carry a shooting head wallet with me and have an assortment of heads for different conditions. This should allow me to fish most water. Already picked up two new AFS sinking heads in s2/s3 and s3/s4.

  12. #12

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    Stay versatile my man. I would carry a few different heads for sure.

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