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Thread: Cabin design site

  1. #1
    Supporting Member bullbuster's Avatar
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    Question Cabin design site

    I am looking for cabin (2nd home) ideas. I have been looking at floor plans for a couple of years. I have yet to find the plan that I think is the one. Not committed to log or stick yet. Love the log, but time is precious.

    Is there a site that I can design a floor plan on? Something that can have dimensions added or changed.
    I think that once I have a plan, then I can make my mind up about the materials. I have pages of sketches. They are as varied as 2 squares interlocked to a flat trapper style to a 2 story barn. I'm all over the map.

    HuntNPhotos cabin has a great wrap around porch that is covered. I added that to the list of desirables. I have looked at all the post a pic of yours and some nice ones.

    I am a couple of years out from attacking the build, but if I had an idea I could start some foundation work this summer.
    Leaning towards heated slab, but it would involve a barge. $$$$ I can bang some piles down pretty easy, but that adds other considerations.
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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    I don't know of any sites like that. Most home architect software can't seem to deal with Alaskan building problems like steep pitches, lofts, etc. How big are you planning? The number one thing that gets guys in trouble off the road system is building too wide and trying to figure out how to design the roof to handle the snow load.

  3. #3
    Supporting Member bullbuster's Avatar
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    I might be forced to learn auto cadd, I guess.
    I am of 2 minds on the layout.
    One is long and narrow single story. Something in the order of 35-40 x 25-30'. Easier on my old bones as the years add up.
    The other is a 2 story, living down and sleeping up. This would enable a smaller footprint for the foundation.
    I want a couple of bedrooms, a central room, kitchen with large pantry storage, one full bath, maybe a second toilet only room and dining area. Need a mud room at one entrance. Probably between 1000 and 1800 sf.
    I have been checking out the cold weather building research programs looking for ideas. They are devoid of useful information that can be used for planning or building.


    Doug hit the nail on the head. It has to be able to be left unattended for long periods of time.
    I have about 10 acres of beetle killed spruce. Nice diameter trees, about 24" dia at 4' ABGL. The few that I have cut show some rot near the stump. Not sure how many years they will be useable for house logs. I simply don't have the time to log and peel trees right now. By the time I do, they will probably be firewood.
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    I have a small cheap (paid $10) program called Broderbund 3D Home Architect Deluxe 3.0.
    I use it for floor plans, quick and easy.

    It's good for doing a floor plan to get it to scale.
    The roof mode and most everything else is poor.

    File can be imported to AutoCad etc.

    Before I get slammed for using such non-professional software, I also use ArchiCAD , SoftPlan, and AutoCad.
    Might have an extra copy around, I'll look.
    "The older I get, the better I was."

  5. #5
    Supporting Member bullbuster's Avatar
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    I went to the Broderbund site and while I didn't find that one, they have a selection. I never though about looking for a program, duh.

    Thanks Travelers!
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    Member cdubbin's Avatar
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    I've used SketchUp and Punch, but find them frustrating and always come back to good old graph paper and pencil for roughing out ideas, floor plans, elevations and details.
    " Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

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    Bull, As you mention about old bones a couple of things to think about and one as you stated is single floor and the other is to use 3-0 doors through as one never knows when there might be a wheel chair around. And the cost of a 3-0 door compared to the smaller sizes is not that great.

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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    When you said "cabin" I think of just that....a small/er place in the woods..more of a man cave than anything else with little or not a lot of frills. But then you said "heated slab", so that puts a whole new swing on things.
    As a carpenter, just let me say this......unless you have some EXCELLENT logs, although nice and strong, they "can" be a headache. it's hard to heat a place nicely that has cracks everywhere. So keep that in mind. You need excellent logs if you want efficiency. If it was me I'd probably build a stick frame and then if you want some aesthetics, put some half log siding up.

    When I hunted bison up in Delta we stayed in a cabin that had a nice design. If I recall it was only 16x20 or 20x24. Had a nice kitchen, dining/living room, 1 bath (even a sauna) and the bed room was a large open loft.

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    Supporting Member bullbuster's Avatar
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    I have the man cave part down. Well, kind of a man burrow. Just right for a guy and his dog.
    12x16. If I build, then I want a place to spend a lot of time at. I have a pretty piece of dirt to put it on.



    This is a site that I found. Easy to use and worth wasting a little time on.

    I put in a heated slab here at the house for my greenhouse. I love it and would LIKE to incorporate it into the cabin. Lot of extra work, but worth it. Truth is I will probably end up with a stick built. On pile. Wood stove.

    I have been known to stumble onto a deal though. A couple of out of work kids can get a lot done, with proper direction. I have been kicking this around for a couple of years at least. I just need to nail down what I want, how much do I have to spend and when do I have the time to do it. So now I have an eye half open for a smokin deal on a scribe fit shell. Finding one could change all my design ideas. If nothing comes up before I build, then 2x6's it is.
    I have a buddy that has built a lot of log homes. He is not wanting this project (getting old), but has personally checked out about 5 different "kits" and log stacks for me. He has seen nothing that he would work with.

    Maybe that guy with the "school" would have a class at my place.
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  10. #10

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    Try this site. I joined a while back and have built a couple of the plans featured... Lots of good help and direction....

    http://countryplans.com/

    Kevin

  11. #11
    Supporting Member bullbuster's Avatar
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    Great site keh. I really like the one that Nevada Mike built. Might be the one.
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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Those dormers will be a huge problem in real snow country. His place is down on POW and it will work fine there where their snow really doesn't stick. I can send you photos of a dozen dormered places that have huge issues with ice in our area.

  13. #13
    Member cdubbin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKDoug View Post
    Those dormers will be a huge problem in real snow country. His place is down on POW and it will work fine there where their snow really doesn't stick. I can send you photos of a dozen dormered places that have huge issues with ice in our area.
    True that. I've got a buddy with a large gable dormer entryway beneath another overhang, and the ice has peeled back the leading edge of the metal roofing at the bottom of the valley like a G.I. can opener. Considering that the house isn't finished yet and he already has to redo the roof, I'd call that a design flaw, lol.
    " Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

  14. #14
    Supporting Member bullbuster's Avatar
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    Thanks for that! That is a good reason to post here.

    OK, probably not gonna have dormers. Maybe a second story deck though...
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    Premium Member bmunsell's Avatar
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    You really should give Sketchup a try. The main thing to remember is that Sketchup is simply the computerized version of your basic graph paper and ruler with the additional ability to draw width and length, plus height. The best way to get started is with the tutorials like this one located at http://sketchup.google.com/3dwarehou...74&prevstart=0

    The program is free and actually pretty intuitive and fun once you get started. I've been using it more than 7 years for everything from house plans to cabinet and furniture design and it is great for cabin design.

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    I would give a +1 to SketchUp. It is quite easy to use. You can sketch a cabin up with just the basic exterior shapes, or build each piece of lumber and assemble a cabin from the ground up. There are lots of tutorials and a web based library of sketches that has just about anything a person could imagine. There are lots of cabins in the library that could be a starting point that would be easy to modify.

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