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Thread: Unconventional Fur Things (ideas for scrap)

  1. #1

    Default Unconventional Fur Things (ideas for scrap)

    As accomplished as I feel after making a fur hat, or mittens, or ruff- I really like to get creative with fur. And I know Alaska is full of fur-lovers and artists; so I wanted to share some of my ideas for unconventional fur things that I feel didn’t fit into the ‘fur things’ post. These ideas are for anyone who’s looking for things to make with scrap furs.

    Fur Cuffs
    I make these from red fox, beaver, and arctic wolf. I’ve learned that short or stiff furs like coyote, wolverine, otter, and mink don’t work well. The arctic wolf is stiff and doesn’t look great but sells big because teenage girls all over the world are in love with wolves. Beaver and fox are my favorite. Dyed black beaver always sells big. The fox is beautiful and fluffy and looks great on parka and sweater sleeves. I make them by wrapping strips of fur around plastic bangles. Out of one wolf I could make around 500 cuffs. Out of one fox I usually get around 100. I sell them for $12.00 each. Obviously that adds up pretty quick.




    Fox Foot Bangles
    These are from fox that were skinned with the toes but are not taxidermy quality. I just wrapped them around an old leather belt to create a bangle. I sell them for $24.00 and they sell super quick. Just with the feet alone I make up for the price of the tanned fox fur.



    Fox Ears Headband and Tail Clip
    These sell HUGE during Halloween. I sold probably twenty last year the first time I listed these sets. I take the ears and cut them into a long strip then glue them onto a plain headband base. For the tail I just sew on a pin that they can use to clip onto a belt buckle or anything really. I sell these sets for $40.00. Around Halloween I’m sure you could get around $60.00 for them. Girls in the lower 48 love these. I also make fox tail key chains that I sell for $20.00. They’re pretty popular in general and a lot of people make them so their hard to sell. I usually don’t get too many sold because the market is so over flooded right now. If you can ship overseas I know Japanese girls are in love with fox tails and will pay big money for them. Raccoon, wolf, coyote, and skunk tails are also in right now.



    Fox Masquerade Mask
    Another big hit during Halloween! I take the face of the fox and cut it from the rest of the pelt. I remove the lower jaw part. Then I wet the leather completely and tack it out on cardboard the way I want it to dry. When it dries it hardens. Then I remove the mask, decorate it with ptarmigan tail feathers and attach a stick for the girls to use when they hold it up to their face. I sold these for $25.00 and completely sold out last Halloween.



    Beaver Fur Electronics Duster
    My mom loves these. She bought them for all my aunts. They’re eco-friendly dusters! Forget all those pesky chemicals and use biodegradable natural brown beaver fur. This uses minimal amounts of fur. I basically just wrap half of a bracelet bangle with fur and leave the other half open as a handle. When you use wooden bangles these become literally 100% biodegradable and it’s a huge seller point. Plus they work! I use these to clean my laptop all the time. They don’t scratch the screen and the longer hairs get down into the keys. I use it for my television, bookcase (between the books) calculator, everything. I advertise them as “Eco-Friendly Office Desk Dusters”. Small enough to keep in an office drawer and perfect for neat-freaks at work. I sell them for $10.00 each. I have big faith in these little things and I really suggest trying them out if you have some scrap around. Clean your keyboard with the fur. Swear on my heart that it works like magic.




    If you have any ideas to share I'd love to hear them! I think fur is a great way to support the Alaskan economy. We’re so full of trappers in this state and it’s such an amazing material to work with. So if you have scraps feel free to take and use these ideas. Then buy more fur and support the amazing people of this state J


    Lone Alaskan Gypsy
    Lover of arctic fox and northern lights.
    Reader of arctic runes. Alaskan storyteller. Handcrafted trinket trader. Grower of organic plants.
    Find me online at www.lonealaskangypsy.com and at fairs, markets, and festivals around AK.

  2. #2
    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
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    I always thought a mustach cover would go over good, lol, ( hate it when the eyebrows and the mustach gets frosted over,)

    Great thread, and great pictures.

    There are so many uses of fur that would'nt be used on a regular bases.

    Stranger and AK Grandma always has something he/she comes up with.

    Keep up the good work, and the pictures. E.S.

  3. #3

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    A mustache cover is genuis Rock_Skipper! I made a face mask for long rides by snowmachine out of fox fur. The length of the fur lets your breath out but keeps you warm. Your face doesn't get wet with the hydration of your breathing like with the cotton face masks. It looks kind of goofy and puffy but definately keeps you warm and dry! I swear by mine. This year western Alaska had -30 degree weather (which is cold for us, I know the interior gets much colder) and I used my fox face cover every time I went outside. I've yet to be frost bit once. Knock on wood.
    Lone Alaskan Gypsy
    Lover of arctic fox and northern lights.
    Reader of arctic runes. Alaskan storyteller. Handcrafted trinket trader. Grower of organic plants.
    Find me online at www.lonealaskangypsy.com and at fairs, markets, and festivals around AK.

  4. #4
    Member Grizzly Man's Avatar
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    I would love to see a picture of the fur face mask.
    "What is it about a beautiful sunny afternoon, with the birds singing and the wind rustling through the leaves, that makes you want to get drunk?” --Jack Handy

  5. #5
    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grizzly Man View Post
    I would love to see a picture of the fur face mask.
    me too...
    the bacalavas (?) fog up my glasses unless I pull the baclava down around my chin... then my cheeks and nose get frosted...

  6. #6

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    Grizzly_Man Next time I pull it out I’ll take a picture! The fur is facing inwards and there’s sparkly purple fabric on the outside. It looks like a scarf that you tie around your face. It’s not as ‘furry mustache-beard’ looking as you probably assumed.

    Old_John It will fog up glasses. I can’t wear it on bright sunny days when I wear sunglasses because my breath will fog them up. Haven’t figured my way around that one yet.
    Lone Alaskan Gypsy
    Lover of arctic fox and northern lights.
    Reader of arctic runes. Alaskan storyteller. Handcrafted trinket trader. Grower of organic plants.
    Find me online at www.lonealaskangypsy.com and at fairs, markets, and festivals around AK.

  7. #7
    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
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    Well thanks anyway Gypsy, I bet it looks kool!!!

  8. #8

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    Alright, I got to thinking and decided I would try something. This is for you Rock_Skipper and Old_John. First let me explain the basic physics (not sure if that's the right term) of breathing.

    The body's anatomy: Your mouth directs air immidiately forward where as your nose directs air down and out. Depending on how you breathe, your air is directed in different ways.

    The problem with the cold: There are two things with your breath that cause issues in the cold. First, water. The water in your breath causes condensation. This can occur on facial hair or glasses- and usually will. Secondly, the heat. Hot air rises. So unless you are standing in a 98 degree enviornment your breath will rise. In colder enviornments like Alaska, your breath rises more noticably.

    Issues with the 'stach (mustache, I thought 'the stache' sounded cool, but after I wrote it... I don't think so anymore): In many ways mustaches can be great. Facial hair actually protects the face from the wind. But it also holds condensation- causing your mustache to frost up. When you breathe through your nose the air is directed down and the rises with the heat, immidiately the water in your breath will stick to your facial hair as the air is pushed down. When you breathe through your mouth the air rises. The water in your breath will once again stick to your facial hair. So your physical anatomy is saying 'screw you mustache!" (But don't fear, I've found away to protect your facial hair. Just keep reading).

    Issues with glasses: Once again we look to the human anatomy. Whether you breathe through your nose or mouth the heat of your breath will cause it to rise. By the time the air reaches eye level usually much of the water has dispersed, but smaller particals are still there which can cause your glasses to fog up. When you wear a face mask the air traces its way up under the fabric and the water begins to disperse as it reaches the opening for your eyes- which can cause even worse fogging. If you do not wear a face mask the problem is not as bad but can still occur in temperatures that cause the air to rise more quickly (colder the air, faster the heat rises).

    So the cure. Miss Lone Alaskan Gypsy (Dawn's) face mask strip! This lovely little creation was made specifically for mustaches and glasses. So let's see how it works. It was created with brown beaver fur and outlined with green fabric (so you can blend in with the enviorment- it's close to camo colors- it can be personalized with any color though if pink is more your thing, I don't judge). Thick strings are attached at each side and can be tied around the back of your head to ensure a personalized tight fit that won't fall off.

    The cure for facial hair: You can wear this mask directly over your mustache. It fits snug enough to prevent air from either your mouth or nose from reaching the facial hair. This keeps away frost and redirects the condensation elsewhere.

    The cure for glasses: You can wear this mask around your nose and cheeks (as modeled below). It fits snug enough to prevent air from tracing upwards along the skin (like it does with cotton masks). This allows the water in your breath more time to disperse before reaching your glasses. The this mask also sticks out a bit from the edge of your nose. This helps redirect the breathing from your mouth and nose to the sides instead of directly upward where your glasses are- keeping the fog away!

    Alright, now the moment of truth. It looks ridiculous. I was laughing hysterically taking the picture. If my brother finds this I will never live it down. But here is a sad-lighting picture of how it would appear when being used for glasses. The fur is soft and the strings are adjustable. It could fit anyone really. I'll experiment further, test it out, and then patent the idea and offer a garuentee for saticfaction.



    (I like that by the length of this post and the time it took for me to do the research that the 'post quick reply' button just doesn't feel appropriate)
    Lone Alaskan Gypsy
    Lover of arctic fox and northern lights.
    Reader of arctic runes. Alaskan storyteller. Handcrafted trinket trader. Grower of organic plants.
    Find me online at www.lonealaskangypsy.com and at fairs, markets, and festivals around AK.

  9. #9
    Member dkwarthog's Avatar
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    I will vouch for the concept. When I was running dogs alot, my nemesis was the icing of my glasses while on the trail. At the time I had absolutely horrible eyesight (20/200) and NEEDED my glasses to function. ...but it was only a real problem when the temps hit 30 below.

    What I did was cut a triangle of neoprene from a beer bottle "condom" (because it had a natural curve to it) and used a paper clip to hold the bottom edge of the neoprene to the right arc to match my nose. Then I slid my glasses over the top portion of it to hold it in place.

    It looked stupid as hell, but worked incredibly well. Kept my nose breath from rising up and fogging my glasses, but more importantly, it kept my nose warm so that I didnt have to have the turtle fur neck band over my nose to keep it warm.

    I carried one in my parka for years and rarely used it unless it got 30 below, especially if there were other people around


    Then I got my eyes lasered and now if my glasses ice up, I just take them off....problem solved...sort of..

  10. #10
    Member Arcticmayhem's Avatar
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    Take a look at the NO FOG face masks. I use one under my moto-x style snowmachine helmet and it does a great job keeping my goggles clear. Maybe something like that made out of fur, attached to a nice fur hat with a ruff would work. The nose bridge has a bendable strip to make it fit any shaped face around the nose and cheeks. It might look a little goofy but when it is cold, I will put function over fashion any day.

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    AKgypsy,
    Awsome thread, in Bristol Bay some skin sowers would make the fur balls at the end of the tie strings. Some one started putting those on small dowls and used them as bouquet additions. I dont' see why with your skills you couldn't make fur stuff bouquets arrangments...

    Great thinking on the cuffs. I need some for the top of my Bunny Boots to keep from chaffing my shins when I don't have something tucked in to the tops..;.

    George

  12. #12

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    dkwarthog:I know what you mean about functionality before fashion. Alaska's cold takes the style to the grave. I've done some pretty awkward stuff to stay warm. The Eskimos in my village get a kick out of the white girl's way of dressing. Just smile and wave. I love being outdoors, but I'm never risking my pale skin the hurt of frost bite. I know the scars would last forever- they always do with practically albino white skin.

    Arcticmayhem: I will look into those! I always love trying fur out on different ideas.

    George_Riddle: Thanks for the compliment! Made my day. I LOVE the idea of fur bouqets! How creative. I know a native woman here who makes 'fur bows' for little girls' hair. I think they're adorable. Wish I had pictures to share.
    Lone Alaskan Gypsy
    Lover of arctic fox and northern lights.
    Reader of arctic runes. Alaskan storyteller. Handcrafted trinket trader. Grower of organic plants.
    Find me online at www.lonealaskangypsy.com and at fairs, markets, and festivals around AK.

  13. #13
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    gypsy,

    I grew up in Bristol Bay, King Salmon/Naknek. My wife and I were highschool sweet hearts, now married almopst 29 yrs. We raised our daughter out there but moved to Wasilla in 07. What village are you hanging out in?

    George

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