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Thread: The rundown of unit 20

  1. #1

    Default The rundown of unit 20

    Ive been reeding up on the regulations. I plan to hunt unit 20 for the most part. For the first year I will be a nonresident. my understanding of the regulations so far is that just about everything open in this area thats open to hunting is open to nonresident's with the exception of the Minito flats managment area and 20F. I also have read cramers field is open to general season according to the regs but when you read some small print before this it states something about only being open by registration not sure what this means, which brings me to why I am posting this blog. I dont have lawyer on standby and the Alaskan regualtions are extremly difficult to learn. Little fine print like I just described is fairly confusing. There is alot of rules ten times more than any other state ive encountered. So I figured I would post this to here a hunters input on specific rules regulations on this area. I understand I should follow up on all this information and not trust other peoples judgment. gotcha, I will so please refrain from the "read the regs comments" I have and trust me I will again and again and again. I would just like some personal clarifications to help simplify the regs. information such as where a non resident can and can not hunt. what they can hunt and can not, what areas require 50 inch or 4 tine and which donot. what areas within areas you can not hunt or drive down or have four wheeler access, which areas have roads that are accesible, which require a hike form the road due to no access by vehicle ex . Any information on specific rules for areas throughout 20 that your familiar with or have learned form experience. pretty much anything pertaining to hunting regualtions in unit 20. Help us newbies be safe and legal hunters. I dont belive most of those who brake the rules mean to some times there honest mistakes and you need a lawyer to understand this stuff. I am a very cautios hunter this is just a nother way I learn by putting the regulations into simple understandable language.

    Again all who read please double check the information before acting on the advise. (now that Ive covered this lets continue on)

  2. #2
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dakota boy View Post
    I also have read cramers field is open to general season according to the regs but when you read on it states somthing about only being open by registartion not sure what this means...
    I can't help you with stuff specific to Unit 20, but with regards to registration permits, take a look at this link.

    The relevant information is as follows:

    In some areas, a combination of accessible animals and hunter demand could result in overharvest of a species and/or a high density of hunters. In these areas, managers may offer registration permits. In a registration hunt, you will have to sign in or register before you hunt a specific species in a particular area. Managers often set a goal for the number of animals that can be taken during a registration hunt. When this goal is reached, registration hunts can be quickly closed down. You should consult the area biologist about the hunt conditions and requirements of the permit before deciding to go on a registration hunt.
    Generally speaking, registration permits are either available online or in person at a designated Fish and Game office. Some hunts have a limited number of permits available while others are unlimited until the hunt closes due to the harvest quota being met. For those that are limited in number, being there early - sometimes the night before - will go a long ways towards securing a permit. Again, I have no idea how this works out for Creamer's field, but that's the basic gist of how Registration permits work.

  3. #3
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    Welcome to the wonderful world of Alaska hunting! As you have already seen in other posts, you can get a lot of great information from folks on the forum, but one thing to keep in mind is most of us are not the folks who enforce the regs. If you have some points/issues you are confused on, highlight them and go to the F&G, the Troopers, and/or the wildlife bios. They can give you a wealth of information and usually clear up any confusion. I've been aided by the Troopers a few times on clarifying points that may cost me money/game in my early years of Alaska hunting. I'm not trying to be a smart@$$, but I have found those folks to generally be very helpful.

    Good luck!

    Moose44

  4. #4
    Member AK Ray's Avatar
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    As you have noticed the GMU around Fairbanks has a lot of details. Any hunt area that has a large population, and a large mix of private land, state land, military land, and restricted use public land is going to require some research.

    Ever hear of the process of elimination? Use it to help yourself.

    What I recommend you do is print out the GMU 20 section, then take a black marker and on the species tables, starting in the left column black out all the lines starting with "R" leaving the "B" and "N" clear. Leave the "unit area" clear, just black out the "bag limit" info in the middle all the way to the right column.

    Once you do that look in the "permit" column and black out every line that does not have a "HT" or a number code that starts with "R". This will leave you with only the species and subunits that are availbe to you with over the counter tags or in person registration hunts. You should not have any RM hunts for moose, but there should be some RC hunts for caribou.

    Once you do this nearly all your guestions about what you can hunt and the basic where can you hunt will be answered. Then come back and ask specific quesions about specific hunts that are remaining. Right now you are asking us to read to you a nine page document and that is not going to work.

    As a NR you are only allowed to take a 50 and 4 moose in most areas, but there exceptions and once you mark up the tables those will pop out at you really quickly.

    Keep in mind that AK does not have many roads and those roads that are there in GMU 20 are mostly driveways for someone's home. This is not the L48 with farm, ranch, and county roads all over the place.

    All the rules for GMU 20 are printed in the book, once you have eliminated the places you can not hunt as a NR you will be able to find the rules that apply easier.

  5. #5
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    With Alaska being of substantial size, it is no surprise that we have so many regulations. Imagine a game management area the size of the Louisiana Purchase and trying to learn the nuances of one state (or the many states that make up an equivalent area). You are doing right in reading information and trying to learn. For comparison, other smaller states have even more hunting areas.

    Just get out and do something, perhaps try hunting small game, hiking, start reconnaissance of potential hunting areas. If you start in one area, then think to yourself, if I saw a bull there during the season, does the bull meet the requirements to be a legal bull? Then repeat the process for other areas. In other words, build field experience (while reading and re-reading the regs) in the area before the hunting season.

    When it comes hunting season, perhaps you'll take a stroll down the Rex trail on a foggy day and you see a moose. And with previous field experience you'll actually know whether the bull with three brow tines is legal shoot?

    BTW- I see 10 of your 18 posts were you starting new threads. Interesting average!

  6. #6
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    DB, you've been given excellent advice in all your threads, I hope you take it to heart. Reading the regs is the right start, but you HAVE to get your boots on the ground to give it the proper perspective, and believe me, it'll open your eyes. Nowhere in the L48 will you find situations like you can git in up here. Instead of tunnel-visioning on moose, caribou, moose, caribou, you absolutely should spend your "waiting year" scoping out different areas and hunting small game. Volunteer to be a helper/packer for someone with experience doing the things you want to do. All you'll probably do by striking out on your own is learn what doesn't work, when you could skip that painful process by teaming up. At any rate, it's a semi-free country, just be safe and learn as much as you can!
    " Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

  7. #7

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    Excellent advise cdunin. So if anyone needs someone to tag along this coming year let me now. Getting out there and learning is what's its all about for me. I'm just a little anxious to get to this great state and see it for all it is. Writing these post and getting a mental vision helps release that anxiety.


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  8. #8
    Member Bsj425's Avatar
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    Unit 20 and 20B in particular are easy to scope out once you are here. It is more confusing on a map than in person.

    20A is all across the Tanana River there is no easy access there (yet they are working on a RR bridge as if we can use it is a different story) Most access 20A by air boat. If you can get to 20A there are lots of grizzly's so be careful. Also there is AWESOME hunting on Ft. Greely's DTA but it is a rack limited area but there are huge bulls down that way but it also gets lots of pressure.

    20B is mostly accessible by road then a combo of ATV or feet can get you into good moose away from crowds and in the winter 40 mile Bou are in this area. You can go up the salcha river and chatnika rivers and be in some very good moose areas. Most of the Chena river that is huntable by rifle is lined with houses/cabins until you get way up then you get lots of camp grounds. You also have the minto flats the other direction which is harder to access and you run the risk of severe vandalism if you leave your truck parked anywhere up there. The natives ( no offense to any here) up there do not like white people and military in particular and WILL smash windows/ cut tires it happens all the time. We also have the YTA close to town on Eielson that is outside the bow boundaries. There are tons of trails there that can take you far far away but again gets alot of pressure

    20C has some good moose and bear but most of the unit gets complicated around Denali. I personally avoid it because of the difficult boundaries.

    20D also has good moose bear bou and sheep but the regs and boundaries get pretty confusing especially regarding motor vehicles

    all in all unit 20 has very good hunting and is pretty large I mostly mentioned most places people around Fairbanks go since you will be new and dont have an ATV Et. The mose important thing is knowing the boundaries for the FMA DCUA and TMA for unit 20 and the boundaries for 20b since it is a any bull area ( for residents) it doesnt really matter what ya take at long as its a bull. Also since your new and havent hunted moose COUNT THE TINES to be sure do not try to judge unless you have tons of practice and field time with plenty of bulls to score with someone with you that is proficient at field judging you can get in some trouble and ruin a good trip by taking a sub legal bull. So go the safe route and count the tines.

    I personally if I were you would be to take the first season off big game and put your focus on small game it will help you get to know the area and see the boundaries in person and find some good area. If you are coming in august by the time you in process get your household goods and get unpacked hunting season will be over for the most part ends on the 20th of sept. for the most part so you dont want to rush into something with no Alaska expirence yet.

  9. #9

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    I agree, the first year I ahve alot to learn and will spend most of time just getting out with my rifle or bow exploring the area with no real expectation to take an animal, but thats what hunting is about in a nut shell "getting out into the beautiful country side." I was hoping to make a few contacts and tage along with group. I have alot to learn, but this blog has been excellent in develping my view of what to expect and where to start.

  10. #10
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    Sounds like good advice and a nice plan.

    When it comes to hunting, some tend to give priority to long established hunting partners, friends that have the tags that increase our chances as a group (aka draw tags)... persons with weapon certifications for the hunts that have weapons restrictions, and those with similar transportation methods. For some, it may boil down to who is available to hunt between similar work schedules.

    Alaska is a big state. We have a good amount of hunter turnover. Without trying to sound too discouraging, "it does matter what you can bring to the party". It may be a strong back and a willingness to pack as there is always lots of volunteers for the duty of trigger man. One way to ensure more involvement is to increase your transportation opportunities. Whether that be skis, snowshoes, ATV's, snow-gos, boat, airplane. If you were to say "buy a plane", I'm sure you'd have many people that are willing to hunt with you.

    Hopefully, you'll be able to talk with people about similar hunting styles and maybe hunt as a group. Stay on line and listen to the advice of Stid and others. Some others will post up and ask for similar advice and hopefully you all can team up for adventure.

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