Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 29

Thread: Keeping a fire for a long time in your stove?

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Outta Big Lake
    Posts
    1,633

    Default Keeping a fire for a long time in your stove?

    Hey, I am watching a house for a dog musher, and the long of the short of it is yesterday I worked for 13 hours so it was about 14 hours from the time I filled the stove, till I got back, and there was still some coals left, we heat with wood only so it wasn't a problem, but it got me wondering on if there is a easy to make some sort of tender bundle or something that keeps coals a long time while I'm gone. they have the same stove as ours so its pretty easy to regulate it, but I was just thinking if there is a way. any tips would be good.
    Eccleasties 8:11 Because the sentence against an evil deed is not executed quickly, There for the hearts of the sons of men among them are given fully to do evil.

  2. #2

    Default

    Use birch rounds they go over night and still have a good bed of coals in the morning. Green birch will go even longer but you can't be shy about using a flue brush, green birch makes a mess of your pipes.
    Chuck

  3. #3
    Supporting Member bullbuster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Mean streets of Fairview
    Posts
    1,140

    Default

    I have good luck throwing a chunk of coal on a couple of greener birch pieces. If you can find bread loaf sized chunks, it might be worth a try. (I find it on the beach or river banks)
    It can burn hotter, so dampen 'er down before you leave.
    Live life and love it
    Love life and live it

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Outta Big Lake
    Posts
    1,633

    Default

    They don't have any birch rounds but I could take some over there tonight from our pile. all their stuff is realllllly dry birch.
    Eccleasties 8:11 Because the sentence against an evil deed is not executed quickly, There for the hearts of the sons of men among them are given fully to do evil.

  5. #5
    Member cdubbin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    KP, the dingleberry of Alaska
    Posts
    1,751

    Default

    Alder works well, too. We don't have much birch around the cabin but there's tons of 6"-8" alder butts.
    Let it season for a year, burns all night.
    "Ė Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Juneau,AK
    Posts
    152

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hiline View Post
    Use birch rounds they go over night and still have a good bed of coals in the morning. Green birch will go even longer but you can't be shy about using a flue brush, green birch makes a mess of your pipes.
    I wouldn't be burning green wood...all you are doing is creating creosote in the pipe and clogging the top up which could possibly lead to a stack fire. Just a word of caution.....or maybe you are one of those that enjoy cleaning the stack several times a week in the dead of winter. old man once said.."stoves and stacks were meant to be ran hot.....less work for me".

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Outta Big Lake
    Posts
    1,633

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rosscoak View Post
    I wouldn't be burning green wood...all you are doing is creating creosote in the pipe and clogging the top up which could possibly lead to a stack fire. Just a word of caution.....or maybe you are one of those that enjoy cleaning the stack several times a week in the dead of winter. old man once said.."stoves and stacks were meant to be ran hot.....less work for me".
    We run a fire anyway to keep it clean......
    Eccleasties 8:11 Because the sentence against an evil deed is not executed quickly, There for the hearts of the sons of men among them are given fully to do evil.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    201

    Default

    We burn very dry white spruce in ours, usually pretty hot (single wall stack temps in the 375-450F range) and rarely get any build up in the stack. One thing, however, I've thought about adding/changing - we don't have a stack damper above the stove - just control air to the stove with the integrated vent on bottom. Should I consider adding a stack damper? Pro's vs con's? Safety? Creosote build up? I always figured having a damper would (A) increase stove heat output and fuel duration, but (B) at the cost of build up and chimney fire potential greatly increased.

    Thoughts?

  9. #9
    Member akgun&ammo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    North Pole
    Posts
    983

    Default

    Keeping up with this theme.....

    Is there an easy way to add a damper directly over a fireplace insert?

    Mine doesn't have any damper, and is difficult to make a fire last more than about 12 hours...


    Chris

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    wasilla
    Posts
    788

    Default

    I had a chimney cleaning and install /sales & service business for many years in CO. The in flue damper is going to slow the flue gas from leaving the chimney which will a low for it to cool and condensate on the walls of the chimney. You will get a bit more heat but at what cost in doing so. Newer stoves are designed to regulate the burning by design.

    Getting a 12 + hr burn time with wood should exceed most expectation with a newer stove. That is not to say you will not still get heat from the stove after 12 hrs. There will be some here that will say they get 12- 14 + hrs of good heat from there stove without reloading. There is always a variable, if you have one of the old, homemade barrel or box stoves that you can stuff half a rick of wood in it yes you will get that much burn time, but; at what cost. If you are one of those folk that believe they can throw a green round of birch in there and close the dampers down yes it will burn for a long time, but at what cost.

    True coal burning stoves are among the few that you can expect to get real long burn times and that is still dependent on the type of coal that you can burn. Here in AK we do not have very good coal and itís tough to achieve a real long burn. I have a Harmon wood / coal stove in my home and we burn both wood and coal and itís still tough to get much over 10 + hrs of good radiant heat at the end.
    The key is always burn hot, dry and clean annually if not more.

    Sweepint
    Wasilla, (when not overseas)
    '' Livn' The Dream ''
    26' Hewescraft Cuddy, twin 115 Yam

  11. #11
    Member akgun&ammo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    North Pole
    Posts
    983

    Default

    No, I use dry wood. Most at least three year old.

    For heat: once the concrete around my cimmeny heats up, it radiats for hours. But, I would like to have coals still in the box to get next fire going. With just ashes, seems to take a long time to clean and then start new fire.

    Would like 12 hours because I work a 12 hour shift at my paying job.

    Sorry if I wasn't as clear as should have been.


    Chris

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    wasilla
    Posts
    788

    Default

    It also will help if you are not already doing so us some dry rounds that will help for a bit longer. Then dampering down the combustion air to not more than 3/4 closed it will still let air in for combustion bust burn a bit slower

    Sweepint
    Wasilla, (when not overseas)
    '' Livn' The Dream ''
    26' Hewescraft Cuddy, twin 115 Yam

  13. #13
    Member akgun&ammo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    North Pole
    Posts
    983

    Default

    no flue damper

    Chris

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    wasilla
    Posts
    788

    Default

    Chris
    If that question was directed to me, that would be correct I would not put in a flue damper as to the amount of build up you will gain.

    Sweepint
    Wasilla, (when not overseas)
    '' Livn' The Dream ''
    26' Hewescraft Cuddy, twin 115 Yam

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Outta Big Lake
    Posts
    1,633

    Default

    I forgot to mention that a couple days later after I got used to the new type air regulator, and its opposite of ours, so once i figured that out I couldn't make it back one night cause I was driving a 2 wheel drive with no studs and we had just got all the snow, and I came back ater 26 hours and there was still enough coals to get a fire going. pretty sweet
    Eccleasties 8:11 Because the sentence against an evil deed is not executed quickly, There for the hearts of the sons of men among them are given fully to do evil.

  16. #16
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Valdez, Alaska
    Posts
    4,402

    Default

    You should have a damper in. You may not use it to damper down the fire, but if you ever have a stack fire, you can damper it off and cut the air to the stack. I run as hot as I can while I am home. The only time I have ever had a 12 hour burn was back in New York burning: oak, hickory, hard maple and such. The denser of the hardwoods. With spruce, I can fill it at 10 pm and at 6 am it is usually burned pretty much out. I can only fit 3-4 pieces in my stove. If I damper down then I risk creosote build up or it leaking down the stack.

    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
    Cancer from Agent Orange - Aug. 25th 2012
    Cancer Survivor - Dec. 14th 2012

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Outta Big Lake
    Posts
    1,633

    Default

    Now, just so we are all on the same page, what I call a damper is the little thing in the chimney that stops the heat from gong up and out.....the think you open when you open the door.... and I assume the "flu" is what regulates the air...(we just always say "hey megan, can ya turn the stove down?" or something to that affect) do I have the correct names for this? We have always had a stove in our house but I never really cared about what things were called, just how they worked.
    Eccleasties 8:11 Because the sentence against an evil deed is not executed quickly, There for the hearts of the sons of men among them are given fully to do evil.

  18. #18
    Member alaskabliss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    1,419

    Default

    Woman and children work good at keeping a fire going all night

  19. #19
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Valdez, Alaska
    Posts
    4,402

    Default

    A damper can be in place in many different spots. Could be the flu damper, stove damper or my pants are damper than yours.

    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
    Cancer from Agent Orange - Aug. 25th 2012
    Cancer Survivor - Dec. 14th 2012

  20. #20
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Unalakleet
    Posts
    103

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Daveinthebush View Post
    A damper can be in place in many different spots. Could be the flu damper, stove damper or my pants are damper than yours.
    in the front or back?

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •