Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: square foot gardening

  1. #1
    New member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    4

    Default square foot gardening

    We are getting ready to start our first Alaskan garden this year and are interested in the Square Foot Gardening. Is there anybody out there who has dabbled in this and if so do they have any pointers that would help us out. We bought the book and it seems pretty interesting. We live in Delta Junction... thanks....

  2. #2
    Member mudbuddy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Alaska, Mat valley
    Posts
    1,195

    Default

    Welcome

    I use something close. Not as big of beds as sq ft, I get better soil temps with 10" & 12" high beds & they thaw earlier being above ground. I use mostly compost with some garden soil mixed in to fill the beds.
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...pdate-picutres

  3. #3

    Default

    If you do squarefoot gardening the way it is done in the book you need to do some major soil building. Squarefoot gardening is very intensive and sucks nutrients. We use raised beds similar to mudbuddys, Alaska soil isn't the greatest anyway and takes a lot of work to get it built up. You need a steady source of compost, any intensive gardening will take even more.
    Chuck

  4. #4
    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    1,481

    Default

    I guess you could say I "dabbled" with the sq ft garden idea for a few yrs.. Then I went and looked at MudBuddy's garden layout and I began to convert my garden into raised beds very similar to his.. I don't think our summer temps are as warm as the summer temps will be in Delta Jct so anything we can do (down here in the Matsu area) to increase the temp of the root vegetables goes a long way in improving or increasing production.. I doubled carrot production by switching to the narrow raised beds just this last year.

  5. #5
    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Deltajct
    Posts
    2,499

    Default

    To happy campers, ( love the title ) lol,

    I've lived in Delta since 64 and we had some pretty big gardens, we were giving away alot of the things we grew and still had more than enough to get us by with the caned fish/ moose/ vegies.

    The thing about raised beds is that they require a lot of water, on a rainy season not a big thing, but on a dry hot season the hills dry out pretty quick.

    I remember hand hauling water to cover three acres of a veggie garden, lol, told myself that I would never do that again when I was older, but the thing is as I look back on it now, I'd do it again, ( smiles )

  6. #6
    New member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    4

    Default

    To Rock skipper: We bought the book "All new square foot gardening" by Mel Barthholomew. He talks about the using his own mixture of soil, which is 1/3 peatmoss, 1/3 blended compost and 1/3 vermuculite. He claims that due to the peatmoss and vermuculite it retains water very well, therefore reducing watering consumption. Just a thought on this.......... 3 acres of garden is alot to manage. Do you still garden that much? thanks for your feedback it's always nice to hear from folks from Delta.....

  7. #7
    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Deltajct
    Posts
    2,499

    Default

    No that is a thing of the past, lol, it would take a brood to keep it up. There were 8 kids in the family but at the time there was only 5 and we along with Mom& Dad took care of it under Dad& Moms rough hands, lol. Back breaking work ,hand plowing the field with a tractor and a hand plow, then making the rows, then planting the seeds, then making hills for the potatos, then the raised beds for the oinions, and then the watering of it all. LOL.

    It was alot of work. Then you had to harvest it all, shelling peas for days on end, digging potatos for days on end, canning turnip greens,carrots,squash cabbage, Man I just wanted to go out and hunt rabbits, lol. I should say that I was only 6-10 during this period.

    I think my sis still has pictures of these days.

    I will say that Delta has some of the best topsoil to start a garden with in the interior.

  8. #8
    New member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    4

    Default

    @Rock Skipper; it's always nice to look back in life and enjoy it's memories. I grew up on a wheat farm in Wash. and sure do miss those times. To all: Here is another question.... If we want to transplant broccoli, tomatos, squash from seed in the house to the raised beds by Memorial day how far ahead in time to we need to plant (in the house). I know that this questions is vague, but any info is appreciated.

  9. #9
    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    1,481

    Default

    Happy Campers
    last year I built a little green house and started my tomatoe plants inside the first week of March.. A week or two earlier probably wouldn't hurt anything. I was quite pleased with the way the greenhouse and the tomatoes turned out.. I bought some cucumbers for the green house and they too did very nicely. I really don't have the heated indoor space to start much else..

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •