Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 30

Thread: Hunting on FAT tire bicycles?

  1. #1
    Member BluNosDav's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    449

    Default Hunting on FAT tire bicycles?

    Bicycles sure have changed alot in the last few years!
    With low-pressure tires almost 5" wide and super-low gearing,
    these "Fat Bikes" are climbing up mountains and rolling down trails.
    They seem to handle sand, gravel, rocks, mud & deep snow pretty well.
    Add cargo racks, saddle bags, and maybe a BOB Ibex trailer . . . .
    are these machines now capable of serving as "pedal-powered-horses" back in the bush?

    Thanx, Dave.

  2. #2
    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Tanana Valley AK
    Posts
    7,216

    Default

    While the balloon tired, modified beach cruiser type bike has become quite the craze in the past few years, especially among yuppy city commuters, the double wide rimmed mountain bike for backcountry trail use (especially in winter) was really started long ago, right here in Fairbanks, by Simon Rakower who invented the double wide "Snowcat" rim. More info here: http://www.allweathersports.com/winter/snowcats.html
    ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
    I would rather have a mind opened by wonder than one closed by belief. ~Gerry Spence
    The last thing Alaska needs is another bigot. ~member Catch It
    #Resist

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Eureka MT
    Posts
    3,048

    Default

    My fat tired bicycle has a motor on it and it works great. It's a 1974 Honda TL125.

  4. #4
    Member JOAT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Soldotna, ALASKA since '78
    Posts
    3,720

    Default

    FYI... be very careful here. The regs for many of the no ORV access areas are written such that they also ban the use of bicycles and even wheeled carts. Found that out the hard way many years ago while traveling to the hunting camp on an "old fashoned" mountain bike in what everyone called a "no motorized vehicle" area, but the Wildlife Troopers corrected that term for us, explaining how it was a no "off road vehicle" area, with ORV including anything with wheels on it regardless of the "power plant" to operate it.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Eureka MT
    Posts
    3,048

    Default

    Yep the wilderness areas are no vehicles period. No deer carriers with a wheel, no chain saws no nothing except a horse/mule pack train which can tear up a trail worse than a hundred bicycles.

  6. #6
    Member BluNosDav's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    449

    Default

    Anyone actually using a Fat bicycle to hunt farther off the road system?
    Also, considering the above references to "no off road vehicle" regulations;
    Can bicycles be used to get across the 5-mile buffer area along the Dalton Hwy haul road?

  7. #7

    Default

    I have used mountain bikes before. This last winter, my plan was to use my fat bike (9-zero-7) to hunt the Fairbanks archery season, but bailed out with the cold temps. Would have worked great to travel on the snowmachine and dogsled trails. Those things are surprisingly quick and quiet compared to walking on snow.

    As far as legality in ORV restricted areas, that is something you will need to check specifically for each location. Some areas are closed to ORV, yet open specifically to bikes (Resurrection Pass for instance). Not sure about the haul road area, but I would be a bit leary of how well it would work to traverse the tundra if it were legal. Probably good for some sections, but then just another thing to haul around in others.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    895

    Default

    They are used for the Kenai Caribou hunt tag in resurrection pass. You need a bob trailer to haul all your stuff, the two wheel kiddie trailers are too wide. Sure beats walking. Also heard of them being used on the Eklutna hunts.

  9. #9
    Member AK Wonderer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    717

    Default

    I've read that Alaska is more liberal on allowing bikes in what would other wise be no ORV areas. This was due to the help of Ted Stevens. He made some changes after being contacted by the organizers of the Alaska Wilderness Classic because they were restricted from using bikes on some of their race routes due to the no ORV restrictions.

    I recently read about some pack rafters doing a fat bike/pack raft trip along the coast from Icy Bay to Yakutat. They would bike the beaches, push through the rough areas, and pack raft across rivers and bays. Two hundred some miles overall. Just an example of going a little extreme with your fat bike. You could easily apply the same thinking to use your bike on a hunt.

    I've successfully done the Resurrection Trail caribou hunt on bike. What a trip!
    KenaiMtnCaribouHunt07039.jpg

  10. #10

    Default

    I have hauled out 4 caribou via bicycle between my wife and I and also a black bear. We use BOB trailers, the seem to work alright. Though for going truly off trail, or on a swamp a bike will not work well regardless of the fat tire or not. If leaving a hard packed trail or beaches I'd stick to hoofing it.

  11. #11
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    13,391

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AK Wonderer View Post

    I've successfully done the Resurrection Trail caribou hunt on bike. What a trip!
    Oy! My back is killing me just looking at that picture. Good on you for making that happen, but if you want to borrow my Bob trailer next time you have that tag, you're welcome to it. I can't handle riding with a pack on my back after trying out the trailer.

  12. #12
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Valdez, Alaska
    Posts
    4,402

    Default

    I drew a Fairbanks management tag once and scouted the areas I wanted to hunt. One spot I could access by bike so I made a bow mount on the handle bars and went at it. The moose just thought I was a biker out exercising. Got close to one cow and within 5 yards of a spike fork. Had him at full draw and my tag was for cow only....

    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
    Cancer from Agent Orange - Aug. 25th 2012
    Cancer Survivor - Dec. 14th 2012

  13. #13
    Member hodgeman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Delta Junction AK
    Posts
    4,055

    Default

    I've hunted with my mountain bike and a Bob trailer... nice way to do it where applicable. My 29er is like a two wheeled tractor and I can only imagine a fat tire with lower gearing would be even better.
    "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

  14. #14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Daveinthebush View Post
    I drew a Fairbanks management tag once and scouted the areas I wanted to hunt. One spot I could access by bike so I made a bow mount on the handle bars and went at it. The moose just thought I was a biker out exercising. Got close to one cow and within 5 yards of a spike fork. Had him at full draw and my tag was for cow only....
    I've had similar experiences. Great for hunting on dirt roads. I've been able to ride right up near moose (unfortunately not legal so far....;( ), but when a truck even got within earshot, the moose took off. They never had any issue with me on a bike.

  15. #15
    Member ironartist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Meadow Lakes
    Posts
    1,182

    Default

    I keep looking at the one called a mukluk I posted a link to it in another thread, very cool bicycles just can't think of popping 1500 on one at this point
    Visions Steel/841-WELD(9353)
    "Rebellion is in my blood, I was born an American"
    Μολών λαβέ

  16. #16
    Member scott_rn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    power commuting twixt the valley and anchorage
    Posts
    803

    Default

    I tried riding a cyclocross bike with my bow a few times this year. The pack threw me off balance, I got in too big a hurry to lash the quiver to the pack and a slick trick had its way with my finger. Maybe with a little practice it will be different next year.

    FWIW, a friend of mine said he saw a guy haul a moose out of a controlled use area with a moderate amount of downhill. The guy said he would add brakes to the trailer next time if he could figure out how.

  17. #17

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    Oy! My back is killing me just looking at that picture. Good on you for making that happen, but if you want to borrow my Bob trailer next time you have that tag, you're welcome to it. I can't handle riding with a pack on my back after trying out the trailer.
    Yep in my teens I hauled out a caribou (2 trips) on a bicycle. Biking with a heavy pack on your back is less than ideal to say the least, not that it can't be done of course.

  18. #18
    Member akrstabout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    2,291

    Default

    The FAT bikes won't help any, more hinderence and harder to ride, pushing more resistance. Get a 29er mtn bike and a Crane creek seat post that has some type of polymer bushings and allows your seat move rearward, very nice. I bought the above and used with pack and really cuts the bumps. I also bought a 29er fork the bob trailer and that hauled heavy pack when actually hunt.

  19. #19
    Member AK Ray's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    South Central
    Posts
    2,541

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AK Wonderer View Post
    I recently read about some pack rafters doing a fat bike/pack raft trip along the coast from Icy Bay to Yakutat. They would bike the beaches, push through the rough areas, and pack raft across rivers and bays. Two hundred some miles overall. Just an example of going a little extreme with your fat bike. You could easily apply the same thinking to use your bike on a hunt.
    Biking Alaska's Lost Cost

    Their other blog.

  20. #20
    Member AK Wonderer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    717

    Default

    Brian, when I draw the Kenai Mtn. caribou tag next month I'll definitely take you up on the trailer offer. We pushed the bikes out 13 miles. The trail was too slick and our bikes had too much weight on them to ride without killing yourself. Coasted a few gentle straight stretches but that was about it.

    I know a guy who road his bike up Powerline Pass then took off hiking from there for a Chugach sheep hunt. He was successful too.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •