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Thread: Sheep/Goat stove options...

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    Premium Member AZinAK's Avatar
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    Question Sheep/Goat stove options...

    I know this has been covered before, but was curious if anyone has used one of these? It's the Esbit Pocket Stove. 3.25 ounces and not affected by cold or altitude like some of the gas stoves. Have read reviews that it actually bowls water faster at altitude. Two cups of water took 5 minutes at sea level. Fuel blocks are 0.5 ounces a piece and burn for 10-15 minutes. I figure I'd use a block for breakfast, and one for dinner. That would be 14 blocks, or 7 ounces for a 7 day hunt. Between the stove and fuel it would be approximately 10.25 ounces. A wind shield of some sort was suggested if windy. I am slowly building up my goat and sheep gear and came across this in my research. List what you use, why, how well it works, and how much it ways with fuel. Thanks in advance.

    http://www.rei.com/product/653343/esbit-pocket-stove


    AZinAK

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    Premium Member AZinAK's Avatar
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    I have a MSR Pocket Rocket. Just looking for low weight and efficiency. This is also in the running...

    http://shop.jetboil.com/index.php/sol-cooking-ti.html

    AZinAK

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    Have read reviews that it actually boils water faster at altitude.

    Yep water does that with any heat hense no good red beans in the Denver area. Take a stove that has proven itself with your use and burns good before start of trip.
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

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    The link says it can't be shipped to Alaska. Is the fuel available at REI or somewhere in Anchorage?

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    Premium Member AZinAK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKHUNTINFOOL View Post
    The link says it can't be shipped to Alaska. Is the fuel available at REI or somewhere in Anchorage?
    Looked it up on REI and it showed both the stove and the fuel available in Anchorage.

    Was digging around in the threads and found one Alaska_Lanche started...

    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...-But-Souped-Up

    AZinAK

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    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    You can also get the tabs at most sporting goods stores, Sportsmans, Wally world, etc. all have them.

    If you want dependable they are hard to beat. I always take one as a backup and have also used them in the Rockies while elk hunting and scouting at over 11,000 foot elevation. Nothing much to go wrong with them. You can build a wind screen out of rocks if they are available (when aren't they sheep hunting?).

    My bride to be and I once cooked a full dinner, in the middle of Colorado at 12,600 ft. using small backpacking pans, a tiny fire, and mostly the isbit. The menu was green beans with bacon and onion, chicken fried moose backstrap, and baked taters with bacon and onion and butter, for martini's we had vodka tossed in mountain stream pumped water mixed with snow and crystal lite berry flavor. The straps turned out wonderful on the isbit.

    Depending on how cold your water starts out, you may need more than one tablet - say 1.5 tabs to get 3 cups of water boiling. Take extras.

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    Member Stickeen's Avatar
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    I've used them. They work OK. Burn time is 11 or 12 minutes and in my experience don't actually get the water to a rolling boil, just hot enough that bubbles start rising. Still seems to be plenty hot to do a Mountain House meal. I have one of these titanium stoves:http://www.google.com/imgres?q=titan...1t:429,r:2,s:0

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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    I have at least 10 stoves or more. My favorites are Jet Boil Sol TI, Soto for canisters and MSR Whisper-lite International for white gas.

    With my jet boil I use a small can about every 3 days. Most trips will burn 3 cans for 7 to 10 days. Every trip is a little different.

    Caldera Keg for a ultra light stove and you could use either Alcohol of tabs.



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    Premium Member AZinAK's Avatar
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    Hey Steve, on your hunts in the mountains, does the Jetboil do fine up high, and how does it do with the winds you sometimes get up there? Good to see/read you on here, was about to call and make sure everything was good.

    Chris

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    Quote Originally Posted by AZinAK View Post
    Hey Steve, on your hunts in the mountains, does the Jetboil do fine up high, and how does it do with the winds you sometimes get up there? Good to see/read you on here, was about to call and make sure everything was good.

    Chris
    I never had an issue with it the Sol is like the Soto stove they both have a regulator, the Sol TI will boil water in just over 2 minutes, so I have never had any trouble with wind, but I do try to cook out of as much as I can.

    Hope you have a great and safe season.

    Steve
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    Member Bambistew's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stid2677 View Post
    With my jet boil I use a small can about every 3 days. Most trips will burn 3 cans for 7 to 10 days. Every trip is a little different.
    Is that for two people? I just ordered one of these, the reason being that the specs say a small can (100g) would boil about 10L of water. My hunting partner and I use about 2L per day. I was hoping to get at least 4 days out of a small can.

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    Jet boil, two hunters, 8 days, oatmeal and mountain house each day = less than two small fuel canisters

    Remember that water boils at a lower temperature the higher in altitude it is. That means that heavy duty cooking (beyond just hot water for dried foods) is going to take longer and may require more fuel.

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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bambistew View Post
    Is that for two people? I just ordered one of these, the reason being that the specs say a small can (100g) would boil about 10L of water. My hunting partner and I use about 2L per day. I was hoping to get at least 4 days out of a small can.
    That is with my use only. Many things effect fuel burn rates, water temp, wind, air temp, activity level, etc... I don't share a stove, had a stove save me on a trip and since I keep one with me at all times.

    Steve
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    Stid: first off thanks for sharing all the information. I'm trying to understand the second photo. Is the HEET your fuel? And the pop-top can is part of the stove?

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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LeonardC View Post
    Stid: first off thanks for sharing all the information. I'm trying to understand the second photo. Is the HEET your fuel? And the pop-top can is part of the stove?
    The Caldera Keg is a kit that uses a beer can as the pot and is heated with a alcohol stove or heat tabs.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A9hRpikKrSI
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    I tried an Esbit last summer on a couple Chugach overnighters, the Lynx Lake Canoe Trail and many day trips. Its now become a permanent part of my day pack contents along with one package of hexamine tablets that fit inside the folded up stove. I found that it takes 1 1/2 tablets to make a Mt House and a hot beverage. Nifty German engineering. I use a Snowpeak Treck 700Ti kettle which slides over the bottom of a 32oz Nalgene bottle, along with a Swedish made Lightmyfire spork and a 5.11 H2O pouch to hold the bottle and kettle. Makes a great cooking kit for lightweight trips, but for goat and sheep hunting I'll still bring some serious heat like my MSR Wisperlight. May change up to a Jetboil for next season.

  17. #17

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    I was able to make a single 7 oz fuel can last 6 days of combined use between my wife and I one of our sheep hunts last year. Being one to play it safe we had 3 along, but only used 1.5 cans the whole trip. However, now anything 9 days or less we'll take 2 7 oz 100 gram canisters between us. I use a Soto Stove is a jet boil cup. Being using it for 2 years now and very happy with it.

    Also I had to turn back early on a hunt with my brother in the mountains in high school due to our propane (yes we hauled 1 lb propane bottles up the mountain) stove breaking on us. Since then I don't do a mountain hunt w/o a spare stove. For 2 oz its weight well worth it IMO.

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    Member cohlp's Avatar
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    I've been using the Snowpeak LiteMax Titanium stove for four years now and have been very happy with it. It weigh's less than 2 ounces and uses very little fuel compared to my other stoves.

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    Interesting read and info. I have used Jet boils on a couple of my hunts and the fast boil time is hard to beat!

    Just incase anyone was interested in a little science. Water (and other liquids) boils when its vapor pressure is equal to the atmospheric pressure. When you are at higher elevations the atmospheric pressure is far less then it is at sea level so water boils at a lower temperature and will take less time to come to a boil. Furds00 is correct the water may be boiling but it is colder (then normal boiling temp) and will take longer to heat up your meals.

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    I fabbed up basically the same rig that Alaska_Lanche is using and it works great. I hauled 3 cans of fuel up with me and used 2 in 8 days but I bet I could have done it all on 1. Only reason I used 2 is that we spent a night at the base camp on day 5 before heading out to another spike camp so I switched bottles out. One of these days I will just do some testing consisting of a boil test and a timed burn with a fresh snow peak canister and be able to judge how long it will run and how many cups of water I can boil per canister.

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