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Thread: Hmmm, dat don't look good

  1. #1
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Default Hmmm, dat don't look good

    Pulled the sled into the garage to get all the snow and ice melted out of it to do a thorough inspection. I was hoping to go out riding this weekend, but don't think that would be prudent.

    It's still thawing out, but I pulled the dipstick out of the chaincase and the end of it looked like it had a giant blob of nickle anti-seize. I kept dipping it in and couldn't detect any oil I added some oil and continued dipping seems to bring out both metalic fines and larger bits of steel. Looks like the track change out will happen sooner than later.

    There seems to be an intermittant short in the backup horn circuit that kills the headlight and if it's shorted it won't start. I'll probably just disconnect the circuit until I sort out of it's the switch or the horn.

    So far my parts list is:
    Chaincase bearings and seals
    likely new chain and gears
    Jackshaft bearings
    hood hold down straps
    windscreen
    carbides for the skis
    likely some idler bearings
    ...

    So where does one find out the slides/hyfax to know when they are worn down to the point that you should replace them?

    Anybody know of a good online tutorial on how to change out a track?

    I figure its better to discover this stuff in a heated lighted garage then out on the trail.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  2. #2

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    Paul, You are so right it is much easier to pay attention to details of what all is wrong when in a heated garage than at -25 and the wind is blowing. After you think about all that could have went wrong if you had just loaded it up and went riding it will not be to bad working away on it this weekend. Good Luck

  3. #3
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    Disconnecting the horn would prove if itís good or bad, if ok check the wiring between the switch and the horn. It would be extremely unusual for a switch to be shorted to ground.

    Measure the hyfax at the thinnest point and ask the shop that youíre going to buy your parts from if there ok.

  4. #4
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Chaincase dipsticks will almost always have blobs of junk on them. Don't stress out just yet.

  5. #5
    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    I used to get a lot of new parts like hifax and skegs at Alaska Snowmobile Salvage (near Old Seward/70th 348-8594)? They were usually quite a bit cheaper than the dealers and had most items in stock.
    AKmud
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    Most hyfax has a faint line molded into the side that's used as a wear indicator. If in doubt, change it out, especially if you're going to the trouble of changing a track. On that note, why bother? the sled has gotten along for many years as is. If the track is in decent shape go wear it out. It should do fine with the track it has. To the chaincase dipstick, most of them are magnetic so the blob is the worn metal collecting on the magnet. That's why it's there. Pulling the chaincase cover, inspecting, and adding new fluid is a good plan. What you have is probably petroleum. Most sleds went to synthetic lube several years ago. There's no reason to believe you need a new chain and gears. Jack shaft and drive shaft bearings are always worth changing while the track is out, rarely worth changing for the sake of something to do. The rest of the stuff is simple. Do it if you need it. Don't bother if you don't.

  7. #7
    Member mod elan's Avatar
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    Metallic looking oil is normal wear but CHUNKS are not! Pull the cover and inspect.

  8. #8
    Member FrankieJames7's Avatar
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    heated garages are for weak people and weak sleds, but while your on the topic you can gear it differently if you want...gearing can be helpful

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    Ahh, heated garages.... work on the sled on a lift with roll-away nearby, the stereo rocking, and a fresh cocktail next to me. You can keep the knuckle busting in sub zero temps all for yourself, Stud. I've had my fill. Only when necessary. :-)

  10. #10
    Member Trail Boss's Avatar
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    Thumbs up My Vote!!!!

    As much work as the Willow Trail Comm. has on sleds. It's in a headed garages. And if not if, it's when! And with 6 machines around, it's something, never nothing!
    And maybe a cold brew or two!
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  11. #11
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Pictures at 11, well actually whenever I get around to posting them.

    Findings: the reverse gears were rubbing on eachother and eating into eachother, but probably salvagable. There is a hub with a spring that goes on the main gear and it was completely loose, which is probably why the reverse gears were chawing on eachother.

    On the primary reduction gears, the 21t gear at the top looks fine, the 44tooth on the bottom looks like somebody tried to beat each tooth off with a hammer :O So, I figure I'll replace the 21t, 44t and chain. Clean up the burrs on the reverse gears and replace the bearings and seals.

    The jackshaft bearing seems to be welded in place and I can't get a puller on it. I'm having trouble getting the disk brake slid all the way off the jack shaft so that I can get the jackshaft out of the sled to pull the gear.

    I looked at the hyfax, and they are pretty thin so might as well replace them. Also the track is fairly worn in some spots, but I did pick up a used paddle track so will be putting it on.

    Not sure when I'll have it back together and get to ride it, maybe next weekeng more than likely the following weekend. I did find my box of fuel grade tygon so I'll replace the fuel line from the tank to the fuel pump and to the carbs. I might rebuild the fuel pump while i'm at it.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  12. #12
    Member Dupont Spinner's Avatar
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    Still have that sled lift available for use, so you do not work on it bent over.

  13. #13
    Member FrankieJames7's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Pid View Post
    Ahh, heated garages.... work on the sled on a lift with roll-away nearby, the stereo rocking, and a fresh cocktail next to me. You can keep the knuckle busting in sub zero temps all for yourself, Stud. I've had my fill. Only when necessary. :-)
    yes...i will

  14. #14
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    I finally posted up some of the carnage pictures

    Major source of the metal filings in the chaincase



    Recess on the back chaincase cover that the middle shaft nestles in that was hit hard enough to bust off the top of it, oblong the hole and crack the threaded section



    Front rear shock with broken spring and no end caps for spring



    My personal favorite, the aluminum pivot for the front part of the suspension that was worn so oblong that it wore through the threads. Me thinks somebody ignored that zerk :O

    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  15. #15
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Looking like a dead pig



    As I'm still waiting on parts, about the only progress I'm made is to put on new gas rated tygon with ss safety wire.

    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  16. #16
    Member mod elan's Avatar
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    Ouch Well it's a good thing you caught it now rather than in the middle of nowhere!

  17. #17
    Member cjustinm's Avatar
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    looks totally ridable you can do what everyone does up here. carry a vhf or sat phone and ride it till it blows up then call for a tow. seems to be the preferred mode of matience up here. you got to love it when your 100 miles from santa and a guys pulls up b.s.'s with you for a while. gets off his machine takes the side panel off his machine, wraps a piece of rope he probably just found around the primary clutch gives her a yank and off he goes. If it's not incredibly broke why fix it......

  18. #18
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    I think I figured out what happened. One of the previous owners removed the drive shaft to replace the bearing. That explains why there was only 1 of the 3 nuts on the flange that holds the bearing in place. When they put the shaft back into the chaincase, they knocked the oil seal out of position, which explains the lack of oil. When they reassembled the gears on the drive shaft, they put the oil splash collar on backwards, which both keeps oil from getting to the bearing, and also makes the collar grind against the snap ring. And when they put the bolt back that keeps the gears in place, they didn't use locktite which is why the bolt was loose. I think I was pretty close to a completely grenaded chaincase. It should all go back together with the new back plate and replacement gear. I just need to give everything a good solvent soak to get out any lingering metal particles. As soon as I get the replacement shock for the suspension and new bearings for the upper idlers I should be able to get the sled back together.

    On the upside I traded a friend for a tundra and managed to get in a short ride yesterday on Eagle River.





    Amazing how capable those little sleds are. I'd thought the one lunger would be anemic, but there weren't that many spots were the trail was smooth enough to run WOT, and given the 40 odd y/o suspension design, I wouldn't want to go any faster. I only got kinda stuck twice, but was able to get off and drag the sled out of the holes and climb out of them. I just need to add a windshield as you get a fair bit of snow spray when going through deep powder.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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