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Thread: Tomic plugs for kings?

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    Member Boreal's Avatar
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    Default Tomic plugs for kings?

    Have any of you used Tomic plugs for kings or cohos around SC AK? I've seen lots of reports about their utility in OR/WA and BC or SEAK, but little info about how they fish in PWS, Resurrection Bay, etc. They're also not easy to find in tackle shops around ANC. I'm heading to Seattle, conveniently around the time of the boat show and thinking about picking up a few to try out. Thinking about winter kings in Homer, kings and silvers in Res Bay, and silvers in PWS.

    Thanks!
    Last edited by Michael Strahan; 01-24-2012 at 13:18. Reason: added link

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    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
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    I've used Tomic plugs for silvers in Res Bay as well as PWS. Just like any other plug/spoon/spinner/etc...some days they did well, some days not so much. Certainly not a bad idea to have a handful in the tacklebox.

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    I've used them a fair bit for kings, and when they're right for the circumstances, they're really right. In the shallows I like them pretty small, but the deeper I go the bigger I like them. I had some of my best king fishing ever last spring when the herring were moving up shallow and the kings were right behind them. Trolled them a couple of feet under the surface about 100' behind the boat in 10' of water and the kings were coming up under them to hit them. You got a surface boil on every strike, and a couple of fish came completely out of the water on the take. Kinda hard to keep the pointy end of the boat where you want it going with all that happening behind you!

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    Last year i gave a few Mongoose colored J-Plugs to my buddy. I made him promist to give them a try. He did so reluctantly. He cleaned house with them. He now loves them. A tomic is very much like a J-Plug.

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    I have caught chinook, coho, and halibut on them trolling in Hoonah and thereabouts, and scores of lake trout on them over here. I use them rigged with the bar removed and 15 - 20 pound mono threaded through the plug to a single siwash hook on a swivel. If the leader breaks, the plug floats to the top and is easily recovered.

    Check the mono often for wear at the plug, and after every fish landed. Cut off about six inches if any sign of wear.

    Great lure for lakers in the Spring, trolled with no weight, 50-70 yd behind the boat as close as you can stay to shore. That's Ted's timely tip for today!

    Ted

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Yukoner Ted View Post
    I have caught chinook, coho, and halibut on them trolling in Hoonah and thereabouts, and scores of lake trout on them over here. I use them rigged with the bar removed and 15 - 20 pound mono threaded through the plug to a single siwash hook on a swivel.
    Good idea. I've had marginally hooked fish toss plugs when they got on the surface, and that might well cut down on it. A guy could pretty easily set the hook back further with bead chain or some such, and in the process connect with some of the misses. Don't know about anyone else, but I get more misses than I think I ought to with standard rigging.

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    Member tlingitwarrior's Avatar
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    I know that back to back winners of the Golden North Salmon Derby (Juneau) were caught on these type of rigs. This was 7 or so years ago. I've used smaller ones out in PWS for Silvers and had great success. As other posters, I rig my own way.
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    Good idea. I've had marginally hooked fish toss plugs when they got on the surface, and that might well cut down on it. A guy could pretty easily set the hook back further with bead chain or some such, and in the process connect with some of the misses. Don't know about anyone else, but I get more misses than I think I ought to with standard rigging.
    No question the rigging holds fish better. I rarely have a fish get off, and with the plug slid way up the leader it is easier to remove the hook.

    I also turn the point of the hook in towards the shank a bit with a pair of needle-nose pliers. Quite amazing how much the number of hookups is increased.

    Ted

  9. #9

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    Good to know, and thanks all around.

    I really like to set my hooks back even with the tail of plugs, almost like a hook trailing behind a spoon. We get a lot of what we call "nippers" here. They'll just peck the tail of whatever, and if you hook them they're barely in the lip. I almost never use downriggers or rod holders with bait because of it. The trick is to drop the rod tip straight back the moment you get nipped, even throw the boat out of gear on bad days, then wait for the fish to come back and hit the "wounded" herring that stopped in the water. We use 12' rods with bait, only because we can't find any 14 footers. Sliding sinkers are prime for this stuff.

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    It's a rare day when you'd find me trolling out of Seward without a 5" tomic on the deep rod. I've not had much success on the larger 6" and 7" models, but I haven't swam them as much. If you are out of Res. Bay trolling lures or hoochies for silvers and you don't have a 5" plug swimming down 70'-120', you're crazy, IMO.

    I rig them with the pin pulled (see website), with two small beads between the plug and the barrel swivel.

    I like mustad stainless claw-pointed siwash hooks - don't know the number offhand. I bend a slight offset in the hook with pliers (offset meaning point is in different plane than shank). If a fish clamps flat on the hook, this way the point will grab lip. Think big on the hooks, except if running the 4" plugs, as they can get a bit bogged down by a big hook.

    Big silvers like the 5" plug, too. Last year I hung a lost and confused hooknosed buck red on a 6" tomic, fishing in ocean swell.

    I don't think colors matter so much. I shy away from really stark patterns, and instead favor whites and greens with muted scale patterns. A little chartreuse doesn't hurt either, and sometimes a LOT of chartreuse doesn't hurt. No zebra stripes or big spots for me. Exception for those guys down off WA and BC imitating pilchards - a row of spots on the side helps there.

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    Member Boreal's Avatar
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    Thanks all! I'll pick up a few and see how things turn out this spring and summer.

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    http://www.overstockbait.com/Luhr_Je...r_5004-004.htm Yellow Belly, Mongoose, Dead Head and Silver/Greenback are deadly and they are on sale for 1/2 off!

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    I know some guys down here in SE who swear by 5" plugs in the winter/spring. They run long leaders on the bottom spreads. I'm such an 11" flash/hooch slut that I've never given plugs their due water time.

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    Boreal - My favorite sport-fishing plug is the Tomic #232 as a cross-over presentation when there are either juvenile pollack, p-cod, or herring around during early King season. I also like both the #602 and the one with the gold herring scale insert (I can't remember the number). Some I have pulled-out their tow bar, others I tie-on directly to the wire loop on the front with the knot seized tightly to the dorsal side of that loop. The latter rig-up makes the plug dive a little deeper and sheer off to the side once in awhile. The best results are with the plug off the rigger at least 50 feet behind the boat so it has a larger area of darting erratic action. There are lots of ways to tune these plugs so check out the Tomic website for their explanation.

    I have had good luck with plain white 5" Tomics for Coho. I would think they would work well in PWS and Res. A single stripe down the sides with a chartreuse Magic Marker seemed to work well when similar hoochy colors were working. Like another person mentioned, you have to watch the wear and tear on the line if you pull the tow bar out of the plug body and run your mono through the body of the plug. It takes a beating from the plug shimmying on the line right above the swivel. Good luck.

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    Member Boreal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kgpcr View Post
    http://www.overstockbait.com/Luhr_Je...r_5004-004.htm Yellow Belly, Mongoose, Dead Head and Silver/Greenback are deadly and they are on sale for 1/2 off!
    When you fish the J Plugs, do you use the trebles, or do you switch them out?

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    We just fished them as they came with the trebles. they worked great out of the package.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Boreal View Post
    When you fish the J Plugs, do you use the trebles, or do you switch them out?
    I usually take them out. One reason, and not only reason, is that they are a huge pain in the ass to get out of the landing net.
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    They are a pain to get out of the net! Tinglit how well do the single hooks work? I have never tried them but i have often thought of it. I know on all my spoons i have single hooks and they work great

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    Generally speaking, single siwash hooks will land more fish than trebles... trebles may hook more fish but a shallow set in the lips can be detrimental during the fight; a single siwash rigged appropriate to lure size will ensure a solid hook placement all the way to the boat. Also, trebles can be a PITA to remove from the net vs. a single hook... thus less time your gear is in the water fishing.

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    I always switch out trebles for singles. The problem with treble hooks is, if the fish only gets one of the hooks, the other two hooks act as a fulcrum to pry the one hook out.
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