Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: .45 taper crimp

  1. #1
    Member pinehavensredrocket's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    wisconsin
    Posts
    759

    Default .45 taper crimp

    loading short gun cartridges is a pretty straight forward proposition, and with my .44's & .45 colt's a roll crimp is needed. this is contrary of course to the .45acp that requires a taper crimp for proper headspacing. this then is my problem. generally, after sizing, my cases are deprimed and belled. using the minimum amount seems to make more reliable ammunition AND holds the bullet better. this practice however, sometimes shaves lead.

    using a single stage press, is there a method that works best or is it accepted to have some case failures ?? any ideas?
    happy trails.
    jh

  2. #2
    Member akgun&ammo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    North Pole
    Posts
    980

    Default

    Pine, I like a little more info...
    What brand of dies are you using?
    Is the bell insert actually doing it's job and expanding the case for the projectile, as well as putting a lite bell on the case??
    What diameter is your bullet? 451? 454?
    Have you trimmed all the cases to the same length?


    I read between the lines of your post- and think maybe your expander plug is not going quite deep enough.
    I got some 45 ACP brass that I have used since the 80's and only throw way those that show damage.
    I mostly use a cast 200 gr that drops from my mold at .453, and use a comercial lube called Blue Rooster.
    No lead shaving or lube sloughing off during loading.

    Chris

  3. #3
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    4,431

    Default

    I load a lot with a single stage press and that is almost all cast bullets. I bell the case enough to seat a bullet straight up by hand in the charged case. I do this in a loading tray after all are charged and checked. This allows me to start the bullet straight. Tipping bullets is a primary cause of shaving lead. Also when I hand seat these bullets I push them in tight and they will stay even when inverted or dropped. Then set the case with all components in the shell holder and lower the press handle. I always crimp in a separate operation with a taper crimp die. Another tip is to clean the seater die by removing the stem and getting all lead out of the die and off the seater plug before starting each loading session.

    I still load lots of 45 ACP and it is almost all cast lead. Shaving lead and leaving a small shard of lead at the mouth of the case will accumulate in the chamber. This will result in a failure to chamber after a short number of rounds and will also lead to excess leading of the bore. It is to be avoided, as I'm sure you are aware. I hope this helps with your problem.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  4. #4
    Member pinehavensredrocket's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    wisconsin
    Posts
    759

    Default

    thanks for your reply's guys........it would appear the problem is of my own making. if the case mouth is belled ( more ) it will accept the bullet w/o shaving. i was trying too hard to preserve the case mouth and limit overworking the brass. either extreme is defeating..
    happy trails.
    jh

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Eureka MT
    Posts
    3,048

    Default

    Although a bit of extra work, heavy deburring of the inside of the neck along with a light bell works well for me. To me, the loss of a few cases from splitting of the neck is a non issue as 45acp cases are too easy to get.

  6. #6
    Member JoeJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    ND
    Posts
    207

    Default

    Murphy pretty much nailed it, whether you use a single stage or a progressive.

    I have both and mainly use the progressive for the 45ACP but if you donít have enough bell and the cast bullet is just off-center you will shave just a tad bit of lead that will be slightly noticeable at the case mouth Ė this will accumulate in front of the chamber and after 25 to 50 rounds your 1911 will experience trouble returning to battery and most think itís because of the OAL being too great, when itís a lead problem.

    A work around to this problem if shooting someone elseís reloads is to fire a jacketed bullet for every 20 rounds of cast, as by doing so, you will normally be able to keep shooting cast without return to battery problems.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •