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Thread: Most important single piece of gear for sheep?

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    Member pacific-23's Avatar
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    Default Most important single piece of gear for sheep?

    After looking at Stids pictures of all the greatest gear on the planet and realizing that my disposable income days are behind me; what single piece of gear would most people consider indispensable for sheep hunting? Optics, Boots, etc.

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    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    aside from a weapon, i'd go with rain gear.
    i can live in rain gear, sleep in it, haul water in it, use it as a game bag, sleeping bag, shelter..ect.
    if i had to go ice age on a sheep hunt and only have one item other than my weapon it would be rain gear. flat out...the rest are just luxury.
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    Member pacific-23's Avatar
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    I live in SE I don't leave the house without rain gear... I think my mom told me when I was 3 or 4 "you get wet you die"

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    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    You live in Sitka, come on over to my house sometime and we can talk sheep hunting. I've got a garage full of stuff. I'll leave it at that. Your welcome to even look through my new Swaro spotter and compare it to my older Swift low end spotter.

    Look up Chris Foster in the phone book and call before enroute. I'm home today if you would like to swing by.

    I think you'll find a healthy argument between Spotter, Boots, and Pack all of which are indespensable. Next would be shelter and bag, also important.

    Look and what you have and consider what you can make do with already. Just like those great hunters bagging rams with Levi's. They made a choice not to buy expensive technical pants and likely have a nicer piece of gear somewhere else. It's really an evolution and I've enjoyed hunting with others and cherry picking their great gear ideas. So a hearty thanks to all my great hunting pards! You've all been super helpful over the years.
    I'm cursing Alaska Lanche for introducing the thought of a 6x6 into my head. Grin!

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    Member pacific-23's Avatar
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    Thanks Bighorse I'll have to take you up on that. Won't be today-sick kid. I know how gear goes I have my yard piled with tubs of line, pots, buoys etc. Shop full of rain gear, mustangs, pelican cases - in short, all the coastal junk. Just wondered about the other part of the state I guess. Probably very much the same but different.

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    For me it would have to be properly fitting boots, without them one would never make it to where the sheep are . Carrying ones own weight with torn up feet is agonizing enough, add 100lbs to that and the experience would be H E L L .

    Quality clothing and a little smarts can get one through the rain fairly comfortably, IMO and experience.

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    I run top end rain gear and boots and solid mid range optics. My Pentax spotter and Minox binos do fine and I can't justify the huge price jump to Swarovski at this time. This gear has been my minimum since I was a SSgt on active duty. I have upgraded a bunch of stuff as cash allowed but this was the base stuff I splurged on first. My sheep partner this season looked like a cabelas truck crashed into a surplus store this year and he killed a sheep while I did not so super premium gear does not = success. He did have high end boots and neither of us had foot problems despite covering 50 miles on boot leather. If you have quality rain gear then boots are next. I would look at Pentax and Vortex for budget glass. The PF65 EDII is a fine spotter and the Vortex Viper binos are solid glass for the money. A getter done attitude will be the most valuable thing you can take.

  8. #8

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    The best spotting scope you can reasonably afford. Saves a lot of walking and takes a lot of guess work and worry out of the field judging aspect.
    "96% of all Internet Quotes are suspect and the remaining 4% are fiction."
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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Boots. The survival gear such as quality rain gear, tent, and sleeping bag are non-negotiables when heading into the backcountry whether your quarry is sheep, caribou, or pictures of squirrels, so I'll skip those. For the other things that can be upgraded based on priority, though, boots are at the top of the list. I've taken plenty of animals with low to mid-range optics, but if my feet are done in due to poor fitting or poor quality boots, then the hunt is over. For my foot it doesn't get any better than the Lowa Tibet GTX, but there are other quality boots out there as well.

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    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
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    Pacific-23,
    The most important piece of "gear" that I can regurlarly access and that has directly accounted for the 27 rams I have watched tip over is year-round use of a fitness center facility and the hillside trails above Anchorage. While excellent and tested gear is necessary, a physically conditioned body and the mental toughness to keep going when times are rough and tough is the most important "gear" for me on my personal hunts and on my professional hunts.
    Boots-optics-rain gear, along with any weapon, are of course important. But because I have never experienced an easy ram hunt, I'll stick with a physically and mentally conditioned body and brain as my most important piece of "gear"

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    Member Birdstrike's Avatar
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    #1 would be toilet paper followed closely by baby wipes. Those two items would go in my pack first.

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    Aside from the very good advice of physical and mental conditioning that ATA brought up...I gotta agree with Brian- if I'm going to spend stupid money on a single item, it's gonna be on boots. Almost everything else I can get a reasonable enough version of for less cash. It may not be ideal, or ultra lightweight but it will likely work. I've talked to a lot of sheep hunters who rated boots as priority gear whether they hunted in the latest ultralight stuff or old school Levi's and Hellys.

    Lowas are hard to beat...one of the very few things I've bought that I'd replace at full retail without blinking.
    "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

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    Member pacific-23's Avatar
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    Having never done it, my initial thought was boots and pack, everything else is worthless if you can't get it (and you) there or back. Already have good Victory T*FL binos, spotter would be nice no doubt. But, I think my next trip to america I'm going shoe shopping

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    Besides the obvious.... one piece of gear that disapeared after day one on my last hunt and was a HUGE pain in the butt to live without....... a spoon. I never realized how such a simple little dodad can make life so much easier! Try eatting a moutain house without one!

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    Member pacific-23's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by furds00 View Post
    Besides the obvious.... one piece of gear that disapeared after day one on my last hunt and was a HUGE pain in the butt to live without....... a spoon. I never realized how such a simple little dodad can make life so much easier! Try eatting a moutain house without one!
    Ha! been there it is a little frustrating ...

  16. #16
    Member Akgramps's Avatar
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    ATA, You nailed it.............!

    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskaTrueAdventure View Post
    Pacific-23,
    The most important piece of "gear" that I can regurlarly access and that has directly accounted for the 27 rams I have watched tip over is year-round use of a fitness center facility and the hillside trails above Anchorage. While excellent and tested gear is necessary, a physically conditioned body and the mental toughness to keep going when times are rough and tough is the most important "gear" for me on my personal hunts and on my professional hunts.
    Boots-optics-rain gear, along with any weapon, are of course important. But because I have never experienced an easy ram hunt, I'll stick with a physically and mentally conditioned body and brain as my most important piece of "gear"
    “Nothing worth doing is easy”
    TR

  17. #17
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by furds00 View Post
    Besides the obvious.... one piece of gear that disappeared after day one on my last hunt and was a HUGE pain in the butt to live without....... a spoon. I never realized how such a simple little dodad can make life so much easier! Try eating a mountain house without one!
    Add more water and call it Mountain House Soup. You can drink soup. Also if you have already opened one packet of MH, you can form a spoon with the foil packet easily enough. You can also carve a stick until it is flat enough to scoop with. Where there is a will there is way. Tundra moss for toilet paper if you have too. Devils Club leaves work once. :-)

    I have to say boots too. Lots of options for rain gear and shelter. But if you can't move..... your done.

    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
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    Member c04hoosier's Avatar
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    My sheep partner this season looked like a cabelas truck crashed into a surplus store
    That was me. I would have to say that there is no single piece of gear that is indispensable. There are a bunch of things that you just have to bring. Some of it can just be "good enough" until you can afford to upgrade. My first upgrades were boots, trekking poles, and Jetboil. Then next came the lighter sleeping bag and lighter rifle. As you can tell from LuJon's description of me above, I still don't have half the fancy gear that a lot of these guys do. Half of my stuff is military issue, which is usually pretty decent if not that lightweight. But that is where the "physically and mentally conditioned body and brain" as described by ATA comes into play. In other words, if it comes down to buying new gear or paying to get out into the field, TAKE WHAT YOU HAVE AND GET OUT THERE.

  19. #19
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by c04hoosier View Post
    Then next came the lighter sleeping bag and lighter rifle.
    That "lighter rifle" is more than a little SWEET!

  20. #20
    Member c04hoosier's Avatar
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    Your new rig ain't too bad either.

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