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Thread: Lake Clark cabin owners - advise needed

  1. #1
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    Wink Lake Clark cabin owners - advise needed

    I am curious as to remote cabins in the Lake Clark area. There are several questions that I have concerning properties that border the lake, and the hardships of getting to the sites, supplying provisions for the sites, and the advantages/disadvantages of living on Lake Clark.

    1. When building the cabins, are all building materials helicoptered in, or are the landing strips at Keyes Point and Point Alsworth utilized.

    2. During winter months, is there a provider for getting fuel such as gasoline, diesel, and propane if needed, and is there any on lake provider for these fuels during the summer months.

    3. I see pretty good sized boats on Lake Clark (32 footers). How the heck did they get in to Lake Clark.

    4. I was looking at some property on the Copper River, and found out that you could not hike in any areas around the property because it was all owned by the native association, and they don't allow anyone on their property. Is it the same for all around Lake Clark. I would hate to think that I was restricted to my own property without being able to hike and explore the beauty of the surrounding areas.

    5. Is all of Lake Clark in the national park, and what is the difference between Lake Clark National Park and Lake Clark National Park & Reserve. Is hunting prohibited around the entire area of Lake Clark?

    I would appreciate any info that you can give, it will help in future plans......thanks

  2. #2
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    http://www.nps.gov/lacl/planyourvisi...&PageID=120717

    I'll chime in on #5 and let locals fill in on the others. The primary difference between a national park and preserve is that sport hunting is allowed in national preserves. In Lake Clark National Park, subsistence hunting is allowed for qualified federal subsistence hunters.

    The link is to the park/preserve brochure, and shows (very roughly) what's park and what's preserve. It does not provide boundaries that you'd want to depend upon as a hunter, nor does is give you private land boundaries at a scale that will keep you in good graces of neighbors. But it gives you a general idea of what's what.

    If others don't post local knowledge, you might give the park/preserve office in Port Alsworth a call, 781-2218. They can likely answer some of your questions or steer you to local business owners and/or Native entities that will help you.

  3. #3
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    1- Getting building materials in. People have stuff flown in two Port Alsworth and then boat them to their site or have the material pulled over land from Williamsport to Iliamna then boated up to the road to Lake Clark. A few years ago to get some new snow machines in to Port Alsworth a group snowmachined in from Big Lake all the way thru the pass with a few air drops of fuel.

    2 - The Farm in Port Alsworth sells fuel. Propane I don't think so. Their is regular air service into PA so you may want to talk to the people at Lake Clark Air at Merrill field or call the Farm at PA.

    3 - They get up the Kvichack and then taken on the road to Lake Clark. Or the Williamsport route. Allot of commercial fisherman take the Williamsport route to get to Bristol Bay rather than going all the way down and around the Alaska Peninsula. I have heard of one guy in Illiamna who bought a new skiff and four wheeler in Anchorage. Boated over to Williams Port from Nikiski with the wheeler in his boat. Then he unloaded the wheeler in Williams Port and drug his boat over the land and put in, in Lake Iliamna.

    4 - As with the rest of Alaska it is your responsibility to know who owns the land before stepping foot on it. There is Native land, there is Park land and other public/private lands.

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    Thanks loads for the advise. Sounds like quite a trip to get a good sized boat into Lake Clark. I happened to check out the link that toofewweekends sent with the nps map, and it sure seems that the property that I am interested in is bordered by native land. Need to check it out a little closer because I really don't want to get boxed in. Thanks for your help, and if you think of anything else, please submit a reply........

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    I clipped the following out of the Nondalton Long-Range Environmental Plan. Not detailed, but gives you an idea of the surrounding landowners. Armed with this info, I'd go here next: http://dnr.alaska.gov/Landrecords/

    Land owners in the region are the National Park Service (NPS), Kijik Native Corporation, the Lakeand Peninsula Borough, the State of Alaska and the City of Nondalton. The immediate Nondaltonarea is a collection of municipal and other private lands mostly Native allotments (see Land StatusMap, page 7).
    Lands surrounding Nondalton and to some extent land within the Nondalton city limits areprimarily Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (ANCSA) 14(c) lands controlled by the KijikCorporation. Also as a result of ANCSA, Bristol Bay Native Corporation (BBNC) owns thesubsurface rights to area lands. The State of Alaska also controls land in the area, including
    subsurface rights.

    There are a collection of private land parcels used as fish camps, on both sides of Six Mile Lake, at
    the mouth of the Newhalen River. Additional ownership in the area includes a state-owned right ofway (ROW) along a road that travels out of Nondalton towards the Newhalen River. This roadends near the Nondalton landfill and the ROW continues to, and across, the river, connecting to aroad that leads to the community of Iliamna. The land surrounding Nondalton as well as most landsurrounding Six Mile Lake is owned by Kijik Native Corporation (see Land Status Map, pg. 7). This
    includes the land surrounding Tazimina River (
    Nughilgutna).

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