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Thread: Fuel for tent stoves

  1. #1
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    Default Fuel for tent stoves

    Son and I are headed back to Kodiak this November for a 10 day deer hunt as long as the winter kill off is low. Our camp consists of a Arctic Oven Artica with a 4 dog titanium wood stove. Stove is capable of burning anything without it melting the bottom.

    We normally use those fake fireplace logs for a quick warm up and they work good but they go pretty fast and burn hot. The alders where we hunt don't burn worth a crap.

    Am looking for suggestions on something to fly in with us that we can use to keep a long slow burning fire going in the evening hours and was considering charcoal briquettes. Reasonably light and inexpensive.

    Thoughts? Other fuel suggestions for this stove?

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    snowwolfe
    I use the 4 dogs stove too. The bannerman. Also use fireplace logs, but cut them into 3 pieces so i can control log consumption.
    I cut them almost all the way thru but leave them intact for better handling. When I use them I just knock them together to break off what I want to add to the stove...

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    I would be really careful about charcoal briquettes. Unlike firewood and most other fuels, they give off carbon monoxide when burning. This stuff kills people every year trying to keep warm in enclosed areas. Several more folks died last week in WA state trying to keep their homes warm after the recent storm took the power out. It's fine to use them outdoors, but I would not use them in a tent.

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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Carbon monoxide is also a product of burning wood. Those folks died because they took an unvented charcoal grill into their house and allowed it to burn.

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    Snowwolfe, this past October/November my partner and I also stayed in an AO on Kodiak. We used a Mr. Buddy Heater with a 20lb propane cylinder. We rented the heater from Kodiak camps and the propane cylinder. We definitely our share of tent time so next time I would plan on additional propane cylinder as we ran out after about 9 days. We had some of the smaller green propane bottles to finish the trip off. We made sure to keep the vents open and we had no problems.


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    Thanks, but have a wood stove and looking for alternative fuel suggestions for it.

    Used a wood stove many times in our AO's s am aware of how to vent the tent. Just trying to find some ideas to keep the fire low and slow while we sleep. Really helps with the clothes drying.

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    I don't think you're going to get an all night burn with briquettes.

    You're probably best off with some seasoned birch firewood. With a bed of coals in the stove putting say a 6-8" dia seasoned log in the box and damping it down should give an all night burn.
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    I don't see how you can get an all night burn without an airtight stove that you can pack full of wood and damp down. And perhaps even needs to be cast iron to atleast hold some heat. I thought these little lightweight stoves were meant for continuous stoking. For years a buddy of mine and I used his wall tent and wood stove. A cast iron Cylinder Stove. He's had two different sizes. The smaller one packed full would barely hold a burn/heat all night in sept. He's since bought a larger one for winter use.
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    Briquettes will burn for about 2 hours, your fire will be cold and dead by morning. But.... Briquettes also burn nice and hot so you might be able to use them to get the crappy wet willows, alders or drift wood to burn or at least smolder until morning. I like to have multiple options available as back up. If space isn't that big of a concern take some of the fake fire logs and a big bag of briquettes then supplement with whats available when you get there. The down side to briquettes is they can be a PITA to get started when damp. So you either need to bring a bottle of lighter fluid (which will stink up your tent and may not be allowed on the plane) or some other means of starting them.
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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    Look for some hard coal it will hold all night. Also a diesel fuel drip set-up and a couple of gallons of fuel will help hold heat all night.
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    I have a wood stove for my arctic oven but I don't like remaking the fire in the morning cold. I put a generic grille replacement tube burner in it and just burn propane. If I run out of propane I can pull out the burner tube and burn wood. With propane I can turn it down low and let it burn all night. Then just turn it up in the morning for comfort. The burner tube, hose, and valve fit inside the stove with the stack for travel.

    The Mr Heater units are nice but they're not vented. I sometimes carry one for a backup but I don't like breathing the products of combustion.

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    Another option for propane is the Nuway stove.

    http://www.nuwaystove.com/

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    I have a big Mr Heater that I use as a "little extra heat" in my shop but I have always heard not to use it inside a tent because of the moisture it gives off which causes condensation on the inside of the tent. Anyone run into this problem or is this not an issue? The vented Nuway seems like the answer if there is a moisture problem.
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    A few years ago I snowmobiled from Barrow to the Brooks Range. We precut a bunch of oak pallets and boxed them up to be burned until we reached the river where we had willow to burn. We stayed in an AO an I was surprised with how long the oak burned and heated the tent. Don't know if this is an option for you, but something to consider if you're being dropped off in a larger plane.

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