Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: Remote un-named lakes have fish in 'em?

  1. #1
    Member Crab_n_fish's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Houston, Alaska
    Posts
    269

    Default Remote un-named lakes have fish in 'em?

    I've used the search engine here but did not find an answer to my query --
    and that is: When I am looking at aerial remote/back-country locations of Alaska,
    I often notice lots of smaller 5-30 acre sized ponds/lakes. Has anyone ever
    spent any amount of time fishing one location after another to see if there
    is any fish at each and every small lake; and, if so, what did you find?

    I'm curious as these little inland bodies of freshwater have probably been
    around for a few thousand (or more) years, and birds may have carried
    fertilized fish eggs all over Alaska in that period of time.

    Have any professional studies been done to determine if most lakes have
    a fish population? If not then why?

    What percentage would you say have a self-sustaining population? Do you
    know of any web site that can verify it if you do not know?

    I'd appreciate some answers! Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,763

    Default

    if it has a stream in an out there could be fish there but if not ?? the next question could a float plane land as that is the way most of the likes got a start there is a book out tilling of all the lakes that was stocked by the old time brush pilots I have talked to a few old timers , that is how it was accomlished on the lakes that did not have a stream also don't forget winter kill on small lakes

  3. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sid View Post
    if it has a stream in an out there could be fish there but if not ?? the next question could a float plane land as that is the way most of the likes got a start there is a book out tilling of all the lakes that was stocked by the old time brush pilots I have talked to a few old timers , that is how it was accomlished on the lakes that did not have a stream also don't forget winter kill on small lakes
    Actually the most successful stocking projects from ariel/planes was accomplished by dropping the fish from a couple hundred feet. I don't know of any that actually landed to drop their loads, but I am sure some must have. The low level drops resulted in a lot of dead fish, due to the tumbling and sliding effect. The smolt survived the dead drop better. Lots of small un-named lakes received stockers. Pt. Mac has dozens, no streams in or out.
    "96% of all Internet Quotes are suspect and the remaining 4% are fiction."
    ~~Abraham Lincoln~~

  4. #4

    Default

    It all depends on the lake and its history. Some are shallow enough that they freeze solid in winter. Some don't. Then there's spawning.

    Close to 20 summers ago a friend up north and I took off in his float plane to fly fish unnamed lakes looking for new hotspots. We flew in waders and had float tubes half inflated behind us. We'd land on a lake after assuring it was safe, use a pump plugged into the plane's cigarette lighter to harden up the tubes, and give it a try.

    Days were long in summer, and we managed to check 22 lakes. About two thirds had fish of one sort or another, a few with spectacular fishing and some very large fish. I won't say more about where we were or what we caught because we like to keep it that way. There's still no name for any of the lakes on any map, and I hope it stays that way long enough for my grandkids to enjoy them.

  5. #5
    Member Crab_n_fish's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Houston, Alaska
    Posts
    269

    Default

    Someone recently shared this "remote" property link and I was curious, as it reminded me of the past when I had the same
    thoughts rumbling through my head: http://www.remoteproperties.com/yentna/belugalk.html (Middle picture is my favorite!)

    I forgot all about winter-kill for shallow bodies of water! ...Summer of 2010 I was working in Healy, Alaska, and Otto Lake was very shallow with no noticeable depths over six feet -- and you'd be lucky to find such depths when paddling the small lake. There is fish in it and I'm sure a "winter kill" would probably happen quite often during those frigid Interior winters.

    I guess ADFG must stock it every year? I don't know....I also forgot about Rainbow trout needing feeder streams/rivers leading to/from lakes to reproduce. Edit: (http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm...ail&LakeID=440 ...Yep, clicking on the stocking link shows it is stocked quite often. Maximum depth of 7' ).

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    big lake ak
    Posts
    342

    Default

    i watched a segment on one of those canada fishing shows that spoke of raising rainbows, stating that once the fish reach maturity, not being able to spawn (due to environment) was so stressful that they dont live more that 2-3 yrs. the farms have put in a gravel lined artificial stream beds to help relieve stress. they sterilize females for land locked lake release.something about diploid/triploid fish. i have snorkeled a few lakes and found springs and inputs that might provide sufficient environment. this forum has many more professor level members that may speak to this, more than my anecdotal experience.

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Outta Big Lake
    Posts
    1,633

    Default

    I have fished a few of the ponds around big lake that are spread through out the woods, they are mostly small, 1 acre to 5 surrounded by swamp for 100-500 yards on each side. Pretty common, I have caught a few fish out of some, very few, but then again, I only had standard fishing tackle one time, and at that lake, it was all little minnows. there are suckers in the little ones sometimes. there were some that looked to be part of an old river system, that had small trout in them, about 4 inches long.
    Eccleasties 8:11 Because the sentence against an evil deed is not executed quickly, There for the hearts of the sons of men among them are given fully to do evil.

  8. #8
    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    1,481

    Default

    My cabin is just off of "No Name Lake" over in the Yentna drainage.. the lake used to be full of dollies, reds, etc., until the flood of 85 and then the d@mn'd pike took over the lake.. mostly just hammer handles now, but every once in awhile someone pulls a 40" out...

  9. #9
    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    1,481

    Default

    Back in 1965 I was sent out to Naval Communications Station, Adak, AK... There are a couple reasonably large lakes on Adak, but there are about 6 zillion pot holes full of water.. and at least 4 zillion of those pot holes have Dolly Varden in them.. I don't think it ever gets cold enough for those shallow pot holes to freeze solid, or the fish to winter kill... how the Dollies got into all of those little pot holes I have no idea... I recall on a "lunch break" I and a friend walked out to one of these pot holes not too far from where we worked.. I made 18 casts.. I hooked 17 dollies... No they weren't record sized fish.... but they were real Fish.....!!

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Gakona Ak
    Posts
    1,493

    Default

    Check out Grizzle lake and Sheep lake in Wrangel St Ellis Nat Park. My daughter is a fish researcher and did studies on each finding huge lakers and really big Burbot.

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    big lake ak
    Posts
    342

    Default

    any idea how they got there? planted or stream that no longer exists?

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Gakona Ak
    Posts
    1,493

    Default

    Its a mystery!

  13. #13
    Member sayak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Central peninsula, between the K-rivers
    Posts
    5,788

    Default

    On the Kenai Peninsula we have lakes which were once hooked to the rivers such as Browns Lake was to the Kenai, and Coal Creek Lake was to Kasilof. The earthquake of '64 changed the local topography by raising it up, lakes became cut off from streams, and gradually, lakes are vegging in. The lakes I mentioned no longer have fish in them. Nor does the Jean Lake drainage connect anymore, though they were once connected by a stream and apparently had fish in each all the way up to Dog Team Lake. There may be some residual lakes with left-over populations... much like the Swanson River area lakes have residual populations of char. Most people don't want to haul an auger way back to a lake which may contain nothing but the ubiquitous stickleback (and how in hel, do they and leeches get in every lake anyway?).

  14. #14
    Premium Member denalihunter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    67 mi E of Cantwell, 68 mi W of Paxson
    Posts
    1,555

    Default

    I kicked this around too. We have a lot of completely land locked, no named lakes around us, but they are full of fish. I have heard one theory that birds will pick them up and drop them and that's how they get to em. Figure over several thousand years, that's bound to happen at least once or twice. Probably would only take once if the lake was deep enough to not freeze solid. I have a friend who just says "God put them there". I guess that might be the answer too. I'm leaning more toward the bird theory.
    Experience Real Alaska! www.alpinecreeklodge.com

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    big lake ak
    Posts
    342

    Default

    it never ceases to amaze me when i run into an old timer who confesses to putting a few hear and there. there have been so many populations of people in remote areas over the years, i would not be surprised if the answer is simple human intervention. i have a buddy that had some land just off the yetna and su. yensus creek always had reds for years. little less each year till no more. we walked up the creek and found a beaver dam at the lake. a little closer look hey beavers dont use sand bags. someone had built a dam 8' high with the outlet at the base through 3"pvc pipes no way those reds can get over. now there's nothing but pike.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •