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Thread: Radioactive Fish???

  1. #1

    Default Radioactive Fish???

    So after all the big tidal wave in Japan and flushing all the heavy water into the Pacific does anybody have any insight into how this did affect the fish, or did not?

    Does anybody else think that sea level Nuclear Power Stations are an incredibly strupid thing? How can people be so stupid?

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    Member Milo's Avatar
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    History shows again and again
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    i dont know about the fish, but the square miles of floating trash should be here in 2014.

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    The floating trash is already here. Been washing ashore for over a month now. I'm planning on heading out to Montague in the spring to see if I can score a new car and some flatscreens.

    As for the fish, I've found huge energy savings. I took the lightbulb out of the freezer as all the glowing salmon is much easier to sort through. And it all tastes the same. (there ain't any radioactive fish in Alaska... more BS enviro-hype that has proven false)

    I find no problem with sea-level nuclear power stations. Putting one right on the beach in the ring of fire may not be the best plan, but I don't think anyone will be doing that again. Just move 'em inland a bit and construct them to withstand 150% of the worst thing you can think of.

    All in all, this event has showed us yet again how all the hand-wringing "we're all gonna die" hype that went on in the weeks following the quake has all been much ado about nothing. The radiation has returned to nature (where it came from in the beginning) and Mother Earth has once again clensed that which us feeble humans thought was permanently damaged. The Japanese will have to deal with the aftermath for awhile, but it's not going to have any direct impact on AK.
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  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by JOAT View Post
    The floating trash is already here. Been washing ashore for over a month now. I'm planning on heading out to Montague in the spring to see if I can score a new car and some flatscreens.

    As for the fish, I've found huge energy savings. I took the lightbulb out of the freezer as all the glowing salmon is much easier to sort through. And it all tastes the same. (there ain't any radioactive fish in Alaska... more BS enviro-hype that has proven false)

    I find no problem with sea-level nuclear power stations. Putting one right on the beach in the ring of fire may not be the best plan, but I don't think anyone will be doing that again. Just move 'em inland a bit and construct them to withstand 150% of the worst thing you can think of.

    All in all, this event has showed us yet again how all the hand-wringing "we're all gonna die" hype that went on in the weeks following the quake has all been much ado about nothing. The radiation has returned to nature (where it came from in the beginning) and Mother Earth has once again clensed that which us feeble humans thought was permanently damaged. The Japanese will have to deal with the aftermath for awhile, but it's not going to have any direct impact on AK.

    Well said, lots of hype over nothing. Your right too, the crap is already here. They already found a number of the large oyster farm bouys in Kodiak.

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    i heard a little snippit on the news that spoke of the large conglomerate mass that is something like 2/3 of way to the pac. northwest. it was supposed hit there first and the head to the gulf of ak. some time in late 2013 or early 2014. garbage definitely sucks either way. i always bring back a load of trash that i have cleaned off the beach. this year i will watch out for... GODZILLA!

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    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Yes, the volume of stuff that was washed off of Japan is huge. Though the leading edge is already here, there will be Japanese junk washing ashore from Kodiak to California for many years to come.

    It's going to be a mess to deal with for sure. The commerical fisheries are going to have to deal with lots of flotsam in their nets. We'll be dealing with lots of sick and dead critters from sea mammals to fish to birds that get tangled up in the junk or eat stuff that will kill them through GI obstruction and toxin. It won't be pretty.

    Another thing I worry about is bodies and body parts. If we start receiving human remains, our beaches could turn into a "crime scene" of sorts as those parts should be collected up for identification and return to their families in Japan if possible. It could be a real mess to deal with.
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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    i agree, it will be a sad day if we find people. i was born in juneau and have been cleaning up garbage that has washed ashore all my life, as my sons will probably be able to say the same thing. i saw i guy dump out a jar of material on a desk that he scooped off the beach in hawii on the big island, it was granulated plastic from a floating island off shore few hundred miles. the beach for miles was multi-color.

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    Frankly I'm a lot more worried about cyanide, arsenic, and lots of other "goodies."

    Ever wonder how they're going to ship out all that rich ore from Pebble?

    All questions about Bristol Bay salmon aside, they're not going to run freighters in and out of the bay.

    I did some checking, and no Pebble official wants to talk about it in public, but current plants are to grind the ore, slurry it with water, and pump it in a new pipeline across the Peninsula to the Shelikof. I forget the name of the place, but there's already a road there, so no issues about access route for the pipeline.

    Here's the big deal. All that water from the pipeline has to be removed from the ore before it's put on ships.

    And that water is going into the Shelikof Strait and Cook Inlet. After soaking ore rich in nice stuff for fish.

    Talk about a wool pulling job, keeping the discussion about Bristol Bay. It's a waaaaaaay bigger issue than that. And bigger than any radiation from Japan.

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    Really? You want to drift the Japanese Flotsam thread to another pointless Pebble debate? Pebble is all hogwash, smoke and mirrors. It hasn't been permitted yet. A design and process plan hasn't been submitted. And it's got years of red tape to get through before any work could even start. The trash from Japan is washing ashore right now. Radiation isn't a concern; that was all left in Japan. It's just thousands of tons of trash.
    Winter is Coming...

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    Pebble is closing in on us just as surely as the stuff from Japan. I thought the thread was about water contamination, not trash.

    I'm not worried about radiation either. But heavy metals and poisons in fish throughout Cook Inlet and Shelikof is real.

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    Honestly I dont think there is any worry of finding bodys. Its tragic that so many people died but anything flesh and blood that wasnt protected will be long gone back to the sea. I think micro organisms and sealife over thousands of miles and months of time have more than enough time to let nature take its course. One thing might be possible is bodys sealed in capsized ships or boats that are still missing or half submerged but that would be remote. I see the bigger danger being half submerged shipping containers or other dangers to navigation. Ive seen alot of containers that have just enough air in them to keep them low in the water and there are supposed to be 10s of thousands missing. Not to mention 55gal drums, logs, lumber etc.
    I still hope I can find that load of (slightly used) Air Jordans that will let me retire rich without too many riots at the outlet stores where I will sell them

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unplugged View Post
    I see the bigger danger being half submerged shipping containers or other dangers to navigation.
    And the amount of debris contributed by this event is pretty small on the grand scale. On the order of 10,000 shipping containers are lost at sea annually, as a result of everyday shipping practices...
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    It may be, but it really is alot of junk considering it is all concentrated in the North Pacific.

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    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    There's a big difference between a bunch of lost shipping containers and this mass of debris that includes entire houses, boats, and tons of debris...




    It has been reported that the ocean surface area covered by this garbage patch is 3 times the size of Texas; which means it's a tad larger than the surface area of the entire state of Alaska.

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    what are the odds of a guy with a boat getting a contract to pick up and haul away trash?

  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by JOAT View Post
    There's a big difference between a bunch of lost shipping containers and this mass of debris that includes entire houses, boats, and tons of debris...




    It has been reported that the ocean surface area covered by this garbage patch is 3 times the size of Texas; which means it's a tad larger than the surface area of the entire state of Alaska.

    The thing I wonder is how concentrated all this stuff will be by the time it gets here. It won't be as concentrated as what's shown in the picture I don't imagine. And for someplace like PWS, are boats going to have to dodge lots of stuff like they would after a big storm washes branches and things into the water, or will it be much worse than that? Or will it evene be noticeable?

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    Joat, is that picture for real (?),

    as in, an actual offshore photo of that mass, and it's reported size, by the Navy?

    and if so, they must be tracking it's migration to some extent, as a huge hazard to navigation

    possibly it is way out in the mid-Pacific, not really an issue for near shore navigators ??
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

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    Quote Originally Posted by kodiakrain View Post
    Joat, is that picture for real (?),

    as in, an actual offshore photo of that mass, and it's reported size, by the Navy?

    and if so, they must be tracking it's migration to some extent, as a huge hazard to navigation

    possibly it is way out in the mid-Pacific, not really an issue for near shore navigators ??
    Althought is isn't as concentrated as the photo, it has been reported by a number of ships traveling the open ocean to be at least twice the size of Texas, and probably bigger. One ship said it took 7 days to work their way through. They saw all sorts of things floating that they did not expect, including televisions. There is definitely goint to be some navigational impacts as more of it shows up along the coastlines. I think a lot of PWS will be somewhat protected from the debris as much will likely end up out along the outter coaslines and not make it into the sound, but some probably will. Other, more exposed ports will likely have more to watch for. Kodiak and S.E. Alaska for sure will have more to deal with.

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